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Rev. George William Lav, 
Fifth Rector of St. Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER. 

Vol. XIII. June-July, 1908. No. 1 

The Commencement of 1908. 



Closing Events of the 66th Year of St. Mary's, May 24-28, '08. 



Aside from the fact that it was the first Commencement under a 
new administration and the first in which the Auditorium was used for 
the final exercises, the closing events of the 66th year of St. Mary's 
were unmarked by special interest. 

The weather conditions of the week were ideal, the usual number 
of Commencement visitors were on hand, making the week always a 
very interesting one, and the program was carried out smoothly and 
well, but the small size of the Class, the newness of the surroundings 
of the Auditorium, and the absence of the Bishops all contributed to 
lessen the ardor of the occasion. Except that it is well to have the tide 
ebb and flow and to have an ebb-year come between the celebration that 
attended last year's Commencement and the enthusiastic close promised 
by next year's Class, we should be disappointed. 

Bishop Cheshire, President of the Trustees, was in Europe, where 
he has gone to attend the Pan- Anglican, incidentally visiting the "Jeud- 
wines" on the way; Bishop Guerry and Bishop Horner were unable 
to be present on account of other engagements, and while Bishop 
Strange added much to the occasion by his presence during a part of 
the week he too was unable to preside over the concluding service and 
had to speak his final words in the Auditorium. 

The presence of Mr. DuBose, who laid down his Bectorship here only 
to resume his Trusteeship from the District of Asheville, was a feature 
of special interest, and it was a great pleasure to notice his unfailing 
interest in all the details of student life even now when the arduous 
duties of his missionary work claim him so completely. 
2 

Samt Mary's School Library 



2 The St. Mart's Muse. 



We said good-bye to the scenes of 1907-08 with a feeling of genuine 
regret, mingled with a thankfulness for the opportunities and good 
times that have been ours during its course. May the new session, 
1908-09, bring even better things. 

Sunday Morning— The Baccalaureate Sermon. 

An early celebration of the Holy Communion by the Rector ushered 
in Commencement Sunday. The day was fair and at the eleven o'clock 
service the Chapel was well filled when the Rev. Harris Mallinekrodt, 
of St. Peter's Church, Charlotte, as the opening event of the week, 
preached the Annual Sermon. It was an earnest sermon, couched in 
plain and simple words, carrying a direct and valuable lesson to those 
who heard it. The sermon evidently came from the heart and the mes- 
sage was an appeal to young womanhood to make the best of life for 
life and for those with whom they come in touch. 

To quote from the News and Observer: 

On Sunday morning the chapel at St. Mary's was filled with the students of the 
school and with visitors. The opening exercises were conducted by Rev. G. W. Lay, 
the Eeetor, and the baccalaureate sermon was by Eev. Harris Mallinekrodt, of 
Charlotte. 

For his text the preacher took the twelfth verse of the One Hundred and Forty- 
fourth Psalm, which reads "That our daughters may be as corner-stones, polished 
after the similitude of a palace." 

Mr. Mallinekrodt spoke of the pleasure he felt in addressing the young women 
of St. Mary's, that this school and that at Salem had exerted for long years an 
influence for good on the State. He declared St. Mary's to be a monument to 
culture and refinement, and that the influence of its graduates should go to aid in 
the betterment of all with whom they come in contact. 

Continuing the preacher said in part: 

"The church and the school stand for polish, refinement and culture and the 
world is progressing toward that end. It was not so long ago that the world looked 
down on art. It was because of a woman's interest in Benjamin West, a lad who 
started poor, that he became one of the most famous artists in the world. He 
was given to the world in that way by a woman who recognized his talent. 

"The text gives us some useful lessons and some blessed lessons. 'Our daughters 
have become as corner-stones.' They must stand for strength and power. The 
three great monuments of the world have been erected to woman's power. The 
Sphinx is thought to be a picture of the first great new woman of Egypt. The 
Taj Mahal of the Mohammedans, that wonderful structure, with its exquisite pro- 
portions and beautiful gildings was erected as the tomb of the wife of a heathen 
king, who said he would make it the greatest in the world. The temple of Diana 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



of the Ephesians is the third great monument to a woman's power. She became 
the one god selected from Greek mythology to last into the Christian dynasty. 

"The dark ages might be attributed to the fact that woman was not given her 
place save in the age of chivalry, when men believed in woman. Then in that dark 
age men began to raise up the Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus, for her power 
and goodness until she attained the place given her in the Roman Catholic church. 

"This country might have been discovered long after it was if it had not been 
for a woman. Its discovery was due to the power of a woman. It was because 
a woman believed and yielded to truth and enterprise. So woman, in the person 
of Isabella, Queen of Spain, became the corner-stone of civilization as well as of 
the church. She became a polished corner-stone. We believe in culture. The 
corner-stone must be polished. A woman must know how to perform her social 
duties. But she must be useful as well as refined. She must show people how to 
live right. A woman who is not useful is not a true woman. With her sympathy 
and tenderness she becomes a comforter. She becomes a blessing and strength to 
souls in sorrow and distress, because she takes her heart with her." 

Addressing the young women directly Mr. Mallinckrodt said: "Some of you are 
going out to distress and sorrow, some to work hard and some to reign in society. 
If you have talents, never be discouraged. Believe that a woman can do some- 
thing with her power in this world. Learn what perseverance means and do your 
part. 

"We can't get along without religion, and women especially are expected to love 
God and religion. Education must be conducted along religious lines to be suc- 
cessful. 

"Woman must depend on her heart for guidance. Put your heart into your work 
and it will be a blessing, and a success to you. A blessed future, a grand name 
and a more blessed eternity hereafter will await you." 

Monday Afternoon — The Art Exhibit. 

Our Commencement weeks are rather too "long drawn out" but no 
one seems to be able to suggest a better program for them. While the 
different colleges of Raleigh all close so near the same time that it is 
impracticable to arrange closing programs so that they shall not in part 
conflict, the Commencement Day proper has been kept on different 
days — the Baptist University closing on Tuesday, A. and M. College 
on Wednesday, St. Mary's on Thursday, and the Ealeigh High 
School on Friday. All the Baccalaureate sermons are preached on 
Sunday and there is more time between Commencement Sunday and 
Commencement Day than the exercises require. In consequence this 
year we reverted to the plan in use in Dr. Bratton's administration and 
"endured" examinations on Monday and Tuesday mornings. 

On Monday afternoon at 4 :30 the Art Studio was thrown open for the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



regular reception to show the exhibit of the Art Department which is 
always one of the most attractive and effective features of the week. 
The department had a good year in both numbers and accomplishments 
and while there were no advanced pupils the exhibit was well up to 
the standard. Miss Fenner gets the results year after year and de- 
serves all the hearty praise that is bestowed upon her. Last year she 
had to leave for Europe after seeing the exhibit put into shape, but 
this year she was able to stay through the week and enjoy the enjoy- 
ment of the visitors. 

To again quote: 

The Art Exhibit. 

One of the most interesting features of the Commencement at St. Mary's is the 
annual exhibit of the Art Department displayed in the Art Building. The exhibit 
is large and is this year unusually attractive. 

The work of first year students includes solids, charcoal shading and original 
designs and is very good. Some of the most original applied designs are a wall- 
paper design by Miss Eloise Robinson, a hanging lamp in wrought iron jeweled 
by Miss Helen Blair Daniel, and a design for cretonne of Miss Sophie Watters. 

The water colors are clear and well done. Some heads by Miss Eloise Robinson, 
and landscapes by Misses Mary Norman, Pattie Lou Moore and Eleanor Wilson 
stand out prominently. The oil paintings by Miss Inez Frazer, who takes a partial 
certificate, having done two years work in oil, deserve special mention; a bunch of 
bananas, some cotton, and a basket with corn and apples being noticeable. She 
has also two well done sketches from nature. Miss Eleanor Wilson has a good 
study of books, as have Misses Newbold and Annie Root. Misses Marguerite Hal- 
bin, Nell Lewis and Annie Root did some excellent cast drawing. 

The whole exhibit shows excellent, earnest work on the part of the students and 
deserves hearty commendation. Miss Fenner, who has charge of the Department, 
sails for Eurojje June 11 and during the summer will study the well-known art 
galleries. 

Monday Evening — Expression Recital. 

On Monday night at 8 :30 the annual recital of the Elocution De- 
partment was given under the direction of Miss Cribbs, who has cnarge 
of that department. Miss Cribbs last year presented "A Midsummer 
Night's Dream" with marked success but this year gave a miscellane- 
ous program instead of a single play. The new drop curtain has added 
much to the effectiveness of the Auditorium for dramatic presentation 
but the stage has not- yet been equipped with scenery. Thanks to Mr. 
Heartt, of the Opera House, however, satisfactory scenery was in place 
and the programme was very effectively given, the effects in the "Para- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



dise and the Peri," the crowning number of the program being very 
attractive. 

The readings of Frances Loomis and Bessie Smedes Erwin were es- 
pecially good, while Carmalt Grimes bore off the laurels in her recita- 
tion and her rendering of the reading of ''Paradise and the Peri." 

The program was as follows: 

PART I. 

Piano Selected 

Ruth Newbold 

Spanish Student Longfellow 

Annie Lyman Grimsley 

Aunt Elnora's Hero Phelpps 

Frances Loomis 
It Was Not a Success 

Bessie Smedes Erwin 

(a) Barcarolle Godard 

(b) Polish Dance Scharwenka 

Frankie Self 
Trick vs. Trick John Seymour Wood 

Carmalt. Grimes 
A Woman in a Shoe- Shop Marjorie Benton Cooke 

Josephine Gilmer 

PART II 
Carmalt Grimes, Reader 

Paradise and Peri Thomas Moore 

Peri — Lena Everett 

assisted by 

Eloise Robinson Helen Daniel 

Inez Frazer Nancy Lay 

Annie Lyman Grimsley 

Tuesday Afternoon — Class Day Exercises. 
The Class Day exercises of 1908 were held in the Grove under most 
favorable auspices at 2 :30 on Tuesday instead of in the morning as 
heretofore. The dais, very prettily decorated with daisies and other 
wild flowers, was placed in the near grove at the west of the Circle 
while the tree adopted by the Class is the one nearest the Main Build- 
ing edge of the same side. Few in numbers but bristling with dignity, 
escorting a daisy chain almost as big as themselves, the five members 
of the Class marched solemnly at half past two from East Pock to the 
platform and the exercises proceeded under the direction of Miss Isa- 
bel Hanna, President of the Class. 



G The St. Mary's Muse. 



After the hearty singing of "Alma Mater/' the Class History, enum- 
erating the "ups-and-downs since Freshman days" was read by Miss 
Marguerite LeCron, and the Class Prophecy, being the tale of a dainty 
little fairy to Miss Elizabeth Waddill, by the compiler. Then Miss 
Waddill read the Class Song of which she is the author : 

Looking from Freshman Valley 

To Far-Off Senior Mount, 
The way seemed long and hard and steep — 

The steps we could not count. 
But climbing slowly, "step by step," 
We've gained the height at last, 
And now upon the utmost top 

We laugh at troubles past. 

And like the little black-eyed Sue, 

Our own dear little flower, 
We'll hold our heads up bravely, 

Through sunshine or through shower. 

The Class Bequests, including "N English," Senior Hall," "The 
Muse," and other necessities to Senior life, were made by Miss Mar- 
guerite Thompson, and then Miss Bertha Holnian delivered the charge 
to the Junior Class which was responded to by Miss Sallie Haywood 
Battle, President of the Class of 1909. 

Then followed the unique feature of the Class Day, the "Trial of 
the Enemies of the Class of 1908" which was presided over by Miss 
Hanna. The five "cases" evoked much interest, though it is probable 
that the prosecution was always a little more hearty than the defense. 
The third case, LeCron vs. Waddill, involving the rights and wrongs 
of the "Big Brass Bell," gives an idea of the idea : 

LeCron, plaintiff: In the first place, we hold the bell inconsistent — 
it rings entirely too early for breakfast and certainly too late for lunch. 
In the wee small hours of the morning it breaks our sweet slumbers, 
and at night, in the midst of our good times, with its usual meddlesome 
way it summons us to our little white beds most punctually and your 
Honor knows that we would very much prefer to sleep long in the 
morning and stay up late at night. Nervous shocks are bad for the 
sysetm and this same scoundrel of a bell seems to take a peculiar de- 
light in clanging forth when we least expect it. Therefore we plead 
that the big brass bell be suppressed. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



WaddUlj defendant : In the first place, the plaintiff seems to forget 
that the Big Brass Bell does not govern itself but is governed by the 
Clock. We grant that the clock is a malicious individual, but ought 
we to visit its sins on the bell ? How would we know when it is time 
for breakfast if it were not for the big bell ? The bell is one of those 
disagreeable individuals that are always telling you your duty in a tact- 
less way, but people can not help their dispositions, and the big bell 
ought not to be too harshly censured. 

At the conclusion of the trial the members of the Class proceeded 
to the tree which had been chosen and there formally adopted it into 
the Class, using the legal form which was responded to by Mr. Lay. 
And after there had been bestowed upon it the treasures of the Class, 
the exercises concluded with the singing for the first time of the new 
school song, "Auld Lang Syne : St. Mary's" written by Sadie Thomas, 
and sung to the tune of the first quatrain of Auld Lang Syne. 

St. Mary's! oh, how sweet to us 

That old beloved name sounds; 
Dear memories come trooping back 

Of chapel, buildings, grounds. 

The girls we used to love so well, 

And others that we knew — 
The parlor, school- room, staircase, hall, 

That were so dear to you. 

The teachers whom Ave owe so much, 

So dear to mem'ry still; 
The thoughts of them come back to us, 

Our grateful hearts to fill. 

The lessons that we tried to learn, 

The games we used to play — 
Ah! would those happy days return 

Continually to stay. 

We hear the old familiar hymns, 

The organ's solemn peal, 
And all the Chapel services 

To-day seem just as real. 

For matter not how long the time, 

How far we have to roam; 
For aye we'll think with deepest love 

Of our St. Mary's home. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Tuesday Afternoon — Meeting of the Alumnae. 

The annual meeting of the School Alumnae Association was held in 
the Studio Tuesday afternoon at 4:30. There were more than sixty 
present, among them the graduates and certificate pupils of 1908. 

The addresses of Mr. Lay on "The Days That Are," by Mrs. Iredell 
on "The Alumnse and Its Purpose," and of Mrs. W. E. Shipp on "The 
Days That Were" were all thoroughly enjoyed, and the meeting was a 
very enthusiastic one. 

The election of officers resulted in the choice of Mrs. Iredell as Presi- 
dent ; Mrs. Chas. Root, Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Mrs. R. S. Tucker, 
all of Raleigh, and Mrs. K. deR. Meares, of Wilmington, Vice-Presi- 
dents ; Miss M. A. Dowd, Treasurer ; Miss Kate McKimmon, Secre- 
tary, and Mrs. K. P. Battle, Jr., Assistant Secretary. Mrs. Root suc- 
ceeds Mrs. M. P. Leak, resigned. 

In business session it was decided that all funds paid in after this 
time — not otherwise designated — should go toward the completion of 
the Scholarship Fund. The President will communicate with members 
of the Alumnse about the "All Saints" window. 

At the close of the business meeting an informal reception was held, 
thoroughly enjoyed by all present. 

Tuesday Evening — Commencement Reception. 

Tuesday evening in the parlor the annual reception given by the Rec- 
tor in honor of the Seniors was held from 8 :00 to 9 :30. The parlor 
was very prettily decorated with daisies, poppies and bamboo. In the 
receiving line were the Rector and Mrs. Lay, Mrs. Iredell, Miss Rus- 
sell, the acting Lady Principal, and the members of the Senior class. 

Many visitors enjoyed the reception and after it was over they passed 
to the Art Building to view the Art Exhibit. 

Wednesday Morning — Annual Address. 

The address on Wednesday morning was by Hon. Richard H. Battle, 
LL. D., of Raleigh, a member of the Board of Trustees, and one of the 
oldest and most enthusiastic friends of St. Mary's. 

In spite of the fact that it was Commencement Day at the A. and 
M. College, there was a goodly attendance from the city and of the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 9 

visitors, in addition to the students and faculty, and the address — "Rem- 
iniscences of St, Mary's" — was thoroughly enjoyed. 

It is a regret that through failure to secure the notes before Mr. 
Battle left for Europe no part of the address can be printed as it was 

given. 

Wednesday Afternoon — Annual Meeting of the Trustees. 

Wednesday afternoon is given up to the annual meeting of the Trus- 
tees who gather at 4 :30 in the Library. In the absence of Bishop 
Cheshire, the President, Bishop Strange presided, and there were pres- 
ent Rev. Dr. Robert B. Drane, of Edenton, Rev. T. P. Noe, of Wil- 
mington, Mr. Frank Wood, of Edenton, and Mr. George C. Roy all, of 
Goldsboro, Trustees for the Diocese of East Carolina ; Mr. P. T. Hayne, 
of Greenville, representing South Carolina ; Rev. McXeely DuBose, of 
Morganton, and Mr. Frank A. Clinard, of Hickory, of the District of 
Asheville ; Rev. Dr. E. J. Murdoch, of Salisbury ; Rev. Julian E. Ingle, 
of Henderson, Mr. W. A,. Erwin, of West Durham, Dr. R, H. Lewis, 
Col. Chas. E. Johnson, and Dr. Richard H. Battle, of Raleigh, of the 
Diocese of jSTorth Carolina; and Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr., of Raleigh, 
Secretary and Treasurer of the Board. 

Bishop Cheshire and Mr. Cooper, of Henderson, were abroad ; Rev. 
W. P. Witsell, of Columbia, another regular attendant, was preparing 
to go abroad. The only change in the Trustees since the last meeting 
are Rev. McKeely DuBose, who was a Trustee for several years before 
becoming Rector of the School and went back on the Board as successor 
to the late Rev. T. C. Wetmore, of Arden, and Mr. T. J. Bacot, of 
Charleston, S. C, appointed by the recent Council in succession to 
Mr. H. P. Duvall, who declined reelection. Mr. Bacot was unable to 
attend this meeting. 

The Rector's report' was heard and routine business transacted but 
no action was taken in the matter of the new Dormitory Building. 
Wednesday Evening— Annual Concert. 

The annual pupils' recital of the Music Department was given 
Wednesday night at 8 :30. While there were no pupils of the De- 
partment who had reached certificate grade, there were more advanced 
pupils than last year and the concert was very successful. As the 
second part of the program the Cantata, "A Garden of Elowers," which 
3 



10 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



had been successfully given in April, was repeated by request. 

This concert was a fitting conclusion to the two years work of Mr. and 

Mrs. Vincent at St, Mary's. 

The program was as follows : 

PART I. 
Joy of the Morning ...... 

Frances Bryan Broadfoot. 



Se Saran Rose 

Polonaise C sharp, minor 

The Romaika 

Mazurk No. 4 

Valse — Spring . 

Valse Brilliante 

Voci di Primavera 



Mildred Borden 
Elizabeth Smith 
Jennie Belle Turner 
Beatrice Sumter 
Josephine Gilmer 
Alexina Hardy 



Harriett Ware 

Arditi 

Chopin 

Edna Rosalind Park 

Godard 

Leo Stern 

Loewe 

Johann Strauss 

Beethoven 



Martha Francis 
Concerto Op. 15 (first movement with cadenza) 
Margaret Williams 

(a) Quartette and solo — Serenade 

(b) Quartette — Alpine Rose . 

Misses Gilmer, Francis, Borden, Grimsley, Turner 

PART II. 
Cantata— THE GARDEN OF FLOWERS— Denza 
Chorus — The Morn 
Duet — The Lark and the Nightingale 

Misses Gilmer and Grimsley 
Trio— White Butterfly 

Misses Hunter, Halbin, Grimsley 
Solo — Lovely Rosebuds 

Miss Broadfoot 
Chorus — Summer Breezes 
Chorus and Solo — The Bees 

Miss Borden, Soloist 
Solo — O Happy Streamlet 

Miss Gilmer 
Quartet — Goodnight 

Misses Francis, Grimsley, Borden, Turner 
Chorus — Garden of Flowers 



Neidlinger 
Gerritt Smith 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 

Thursday Morning — The Commencement Proper. 

On Thursday morning came the final exercises, the climax of the 
week. In contrast to the pouring rain of the Commencement Day of 
1907 the weather was ideal and there was nothing to mar the morning. 

At half past ten the guests gathered in the Auditorium for the class 
exercises and the commencement announcements. The Rector, the 
Trustees and the graduating class were seated on the stage, while the 
Faculty and rest of the student body were grouped in the front seats. 
Except for the strangeness of the place and the not altogether agreeable 
innovation of having no music during this part of the exercises, all was 
well. The flowers, the dresses, the girls were all quite ready, and the 
little speeches went with a will. The Salutatory was spoken by Miss 
Marguerite Thompson, the Class Essay — "The Present Need of Past 
Ideals" — was read by Miss Waddill, and the Valedictory was said by 
Miss Holman. 

The Honor Roll was announced, and the displomas, certificates and 
distinctions were presented by the Rector. The ISTiles medal was pre- 
sented by Mr. DuBose, and the parting words were said by Bishop 
Strange. Then with the close of the exercises in the Auditorium the 
audience passed to the Chapel while the different groups making up 
the Commencement procession were formed in their several places. 
Escorted by their respective marshals the student body marched from 
the school room down the east steps of the main building and started 
the procession around the front of West Rock to the Chapel entrance. 
After them came the graduating class and the Faculty who had formed 
in the parlor, and behind them the Trustees and Clergy who had formed 
in the Library. At the Chapel door, as usual, the line halted and 
opened and the clergy, preceded by the choir singing the processional, 
"Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand," passed in first, the rest of the 
procession following in reverse order. 

The Neivs and Observer comments: 

It was "Diploma Day" at St. Mary's School yesterday, the final graduation exer- 
cises closing the many interesting events of the sixty-sixth commencement of this 
noted school. 

The graduating exercises were held in the auditorium of the school, the diplomas, 
certificates and distinctions being announced here, the religious exercises taking 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



place in the chapel. This year there were five graduates in the college course and 
two in the business school. An event of the exercises was the short address of 
Bishop Robert Strange, of Wilmington, who happily gave expression to some beau- 
tiful thoughts concerning "The Joy of Service." 

Another most interesting event was the awarding of "The Niles Medal for Gen- 
eral Excellence" instituted by Rev. Charles M. Niles, D. D., of Columbia, S. C, in 
1906. It is annually awarded to that pupil who has made the best record in schol- 
arship and deportment during the session. This year the medal was won by Miss 
Minnie Tamplet Hazard, of Georgetown, S. C, a descendant of Commodore Oliver 
Hazard Perry, whose "Don't give up the ship" on Lake Erie is part of the nation's 
great history. Last year the medal Avas won by Miss Paula Hazard, a sister of 
the young woman who won it this year. The presentation was made by Rev^. 
McNeely DuBose, of Morganton, former Rector of St. Mary's, now a member of 
the Board of Trustees, who, in doing so, paid high compliment to Miss Hazard, 
saying that to be the best scholar in St. Mary's meant a great deal, and especially 
so as another requirement is that the recipient have a model deportment record. 
He paid a graceful tribute to the modesty and general fine conduct of Miss Hazard, 
as well as to her scholarship. 

Salutatory, Essay and Valedictory. 

The salutatory was made by Miss Marguerite Vertner Thompson, of Baltimore, 
and the valedictory by Miss Bertha Belo Holman, of Raleigh, whose remarks to 
Trustees, Rector, Faculty, students and class-mates were in excellent taste. The 
class essay was read by Miss Elizabeth Turner Waddill, of Cheraw, S. C, her 
subject, "Present Need of Past Ideals," being presented with ability, and listened 
to with interest. 

Presentation of Diplomas. 

Then came the presentation of diplomas, certificates and distinctions by the Rec- 
tor, Rev. George W. Lay, and at the close of this presentation Bishop Robert 
Strange, of Wilmington, spoke briefly concerning "The Joy of Service." It had 
been expected that he would make the address to the graduates in the Chapel, but 
having arranged to leave shortly after twelve o'clock for Wilmington, he made a 
brief address. 

Address by Bishop Strange. 

Bishop Strange held as one of the greatest parts of the joy of service, the doing 
of things worth while, that people existed not alone for their own gratification and 
to have things done for them, but that they would find that the greatest happiness 
and joy came from doing things for others, that merely being a receiver of gifts 
grew tiresome. 

Commencement is a season when students who graduate leave school work to 
commence on a new life, the taking up of real duties. He urged upon the graduates 
not to wait for things to happen, but to do what they could just now. Especially 
did he dwell upon the necessity of holding up a high standard of womanhood, that 
the respect of all men might be secured. His plea was for high-minded women, and 
he declared that these would find the joy of service grow with the years, so that 
there would be nothing comparable with it. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 

The Religious Exercises. 

The processional from the school building to the Chapel was a most beautiful 
sight, each of the many pupils being attired in white, in the procession being the 
trustees and faculty also. '"Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand" was sung on 
passing into the Chapel, where religious services were held, and then the student 
body passed out, singing the recessional hymn, "Jerusalem, High Tower." With 
this ended the commencement exercises of St. Mary's for 1908. 

This was the full program : 

GRADUATING EXERCISES. 

In the Auditorium. 

Salutatory .... Marguerite Vertner Thompson. 

Class Essay Elizabeth Turner Waddill. 

Valedictory ...... Bertha Belo Holman. 

Presentation of Diplomas, Certificates and Distinctions. 

In the Chapel. 
Processional Hymn — Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand, No. 396. 
Scripture Lesson. 
Benedictus. 
Creed. 
Prayers. 
Prayers. 

Hymn — God, Our Help in Ages Past, No. 418. 
Address to the Graduates. 

Rev. Robt. D. Vane, D.D. 
Prayers and Benediction. 
Recessional Hymn — Jerusalem High Tower. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Commencement gtoarog, 1908 



Uiplomag 

Che College Class of 1908 

Bertha Belo Holman Raleigh, N. C. 

Isabel Atwell Hanna Baltimore, Md. 

Marguerite LeCron Baltimore, Md. 

Marguerite Vertner Thompson Baltimore, Md. 

Elizabeth Turner Waddill Cheraw, 8. C. 

ZEhe business ££>chool 

Ellen K. Duvall Cheraw, 8. C. 

Matilda B. Haughton W'ishington, N. C. 

Certificates 

Certificates in the Cnglish Course 

Katharine Henderson Asheville, A 1 . P. 

Sarah Prince Thomas Charlotte, N . (J. 

Eleanor Bandolph Wilson Princeton, A\ J. 

business £i>chool 

Mary B. Peterson Stenography and Typewriting. 

Isabel Pescud Stenography and Typewriting. 

Eliza McGehee Stenography and Typewriting. 

Caroline A. Parker Bookkeeping. 

Irene A. Smith Bookkeeping. 

Lyman Grimsley Typewriting. 

Mary L. Gibbs Typewriting. 

Special partial Certificates in the Jflusic department 

IN PIANO. 

Alexina Hardy. Beatrice Sumter. 

Elizabeth Smith. Margaret Williams. 

IN VOICE. 

Mildred Borden. Martha Francis. 

Frances Bryan Broadfoot. Josephine Gilmer. 

Jennie Belle Turner. 

££>peeial partial Certificate in the girt department 

IN OIL PAINTING. 

Inez Frazer. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



&fje Honor &oll of 1908 

The Honor Roll, the highest public award of merit for the 
pupil of St. Mary's, is based on five requirements. (See page 
22.) 

Minnie Tamplet Hazard, '10 Georgetoion, 8.G. 

Paula Elizabeth Hazard, '10 Georgetoion, 8. G. 

Julia Louise Mclntyre, '09 Mullins, 8. G. 

Georgia Stanton Hales, '09 Wilson, A. G. 

Eva Rogerson, '09 Edenton, A. G. 

Rebecca Hill Shields, '10 Scotland Neck, A. G. 

Ila Adele Rountree, '10 Wilmington, A. G. 

Rebecca Benehan Wood, '12 Edenton, A. G. 

Mary Campbell Shuford, '10 Hickory, A. G. 

Bertha Belo Holman, '08 Raleigh, A. G. 

Caroline Ashe Parker, '10 Monroe, A. G. 

Annie Ethel Wynne, '09 Raleigh, A. G. 

Mary Mitchell Chamberlain, '11 West Raleigh, A. G. 

Frankie Lenore Self, '09 Hickory, A. G. 

Alice Leigh Hines, '10 Einston, A. C. 

Wsst Jltlesi ilebal 

The third award of the ~Niles Medal for General Excellence 
(see page 23) was made in 1908 to 

Minnie Tamplet Hazard, '10, of Georgetoicn, 8. G., 

whose average in scholarship was 97.32 and whose average in 
deportment was flawless. 

Bistingutsifjeb tn H>cf)olar£f)tp, 1908 

"To be distinguished in scholarship a pupil must have main- 
tained at least a minimum course in the academic department; 
must have been 'Excellent' in deportment; and have an aver- 
age of 95 per cent or more in her studies." 

Pr. Ct. 

1. Minnie T. Hazard, '10 97.32 

2. Paula E. Hazard, '10 90.56 

3. Julia L. Mclntyre, '09 96.49 

4. Georgia S. Hales, '09 95.73 



16 The St. Mart's Muse. 



iPrimarp department honors 

&oII of $>onor 
Katharine May Hughes. 
Alice Giersch. 

Jfor -progress in tfce gptubies of tfje department 

Isabel Mayo Cameron. 
Martha Elizabeth Hughes. 

H>ut)=iPreparator!> department Honors 

3^olI of J^onor 

Edna Earl Mann. 
Florence Douglass Stone. 
Frances Strong. 

t£t)e iWuge $rt?eg 

The Muse prizes, presented by the Managers of the Muse 
to the three students who by their contributions have done 
most to help the annual and monthly Muse during the current 
year, were awarded in 1908 to 

Mary Campbell Shuford, 
Ida Jean Rogerson, 
Sarah Prince Thomas. 

These prizes consist of copies of the annual Muse. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



The Class Essay. 



Elizabeth Tueneb Waddill. 



The Present Need of Past Ideals. 

In these days of increasing prosperity and mad rush for wealth, we 
are apt to look upon the simple ideals of our forefathers as old-fash- 
ioned and impracticable for us now, but is there not great need for us 
to think of these ideals and cherish them as our dearest possessions? 
Every nation or individual, to gain true greatness, must conform to cer- 
tain ideals, ideals which are raised higher and higher as the individual 
or the nation accomplishes one thing after another. Our first ideals 
were given to us by those same old-fashioned forefathers. Coming to 
this country with the love of liberty strongly rooted in them, they 
fought and struggled to win for us this great home land of ours. Their 
heroic endurance of suffering and hardship gave rise to the pure ideals 
which, like the delicate little ferns and flowers imbedded in the amber, 
have been fixed in our characters for centuries, and which make us the 
men and women we now are. Theirs was a struggle for mere existence, 
while ours is the enjoyment of the blessings of liberty and self-govern- 
ment. 

In the midst of our peace and prosperity, however, have we not 
allowed the many interests of modern life to crowd out the influence 
of the noble standards of the past ? Some of these standards, I grant, 
have been made impossible by the altered conditions under which we 
now live. 

The increase in the population, and the building of railways and 
great cities have done away with the social life of the olden days and 
there is no way by which we can restore the sweet old customs of hospi- 
tality, so widespread in former days. We think of the big plantations 
with their roomy, comfortable houses set back from the road, and ap- 
proached, perhaps, by a long shady avenue of beautiful trees, and 
imagine ourselves driving up one of these avenues. As we reach the 
steps we can see the host hurrying down to greet us cordially, followed 
by his gentle, gracious wife, while numbers of little negroes look at us 
4 



18 The St. Mart's Muse. 



with interested, smiling faces. The picture is an attractive one, and 
we can not help regretting that its outlines are growing fainter and 
fainter as the years pass by, but we must not hope to keep it with us, 
now, when our circumstances and environments have been so changed. 

Yet there are other ideals which are slipping from us, and which we 
can, nay should, hold, if we will. The desire for gain is universal, 
and the honest business ideals of former times are being torn down by 
those who are willing and glad to buy articles guaranteed to be "just 
as good, but cheaper in price." We hear complaints made against the 
manufacturers and dealers for making and selling inferior goods, but, 
if we look at the matter seriously, does not the greater fault lie with 
the buyers of the goods ? The dealers would not be tempted to keep 
any but the best articles in stock if they were not sure of a ready sale 
for the others, but, recognizing the peoples' weaknesses, they search 
for new things which will take the place of the old and reliable ones 
and win popularity by their low price. We want something for noth- 
ing, or, as one of our prominent literary men has expressed it, "We 
want the pretence of a thing rather than the thing itself; we want to 
get something that looks as if it cost twice as much as it really did." 
As an example of this, think of the immense amount of imitation jewel- 
ry which is sold every year. We may say that every one knows its 
true nature, but, as we are careful to buy the kind which looks most 
real, and do not proclaim to the world its lack of genuineness, the de- 
cej)tive element — the pretence — is still there. 

Even the education of our time tends to foster the longing for gain, 
and the true education, which is the development of the character in 
every direction, is being replaced by the training which enables a man 
to make money. "It's too bad that boy has had so few educational ad- 
vantages, he won't be able to command a good position, at all," they 
say, evidently considering that the boy's earning capacity is the chief 
aim in his education. Then, too, another purpose of modern educa- 
tion seems to be to teach the child to do smart, instead of kind, things. 
It is book learning, rather than a gentle, old-fashioned courtesy which 
is taught in the schools, and, in many of them, the child's respectful 
"yes, ma'am" and "no ma'am" is being changed, at the teacher's re- 
quest, to the short "yes" and "no." 



The St. Maky's Muse. 19 

We hear so often that the children of this decade, in their standards 
of politeness, fall far below those of former generations, but we can 
not blame them when we observe the manners of some of the grown 
people. The people of our Southland have always been noted for their 
quiet, considerate manners, but, in going to other parts of the country, 
we notice a difference. In the trolley cars., it is the elderly gentle- 
man who gives up his seat to a lady, while the younger man, more 
often, absorbed in his newspaper, allows her to hang on a strap, swaying 
with every motion of the car., If the men of the present generation 
seem to have lost their deferential politeness, however, we must not 
forget that the ideals of the women, too, have fallen. They, in their 
desire to be considered the equals of men, appear to have laid aside 
their gentle, gracious ways for a loud assertion of their ability, and, 
sometimes, they even forget themselves so far as to fail to acknowledge 
a favor shown them. 

It is on the women that the future of our country depends, for theirs 
is the task of instilling in the minds of the children the noblest princi- 
ples of life. To them, too, belongs the duty of teaching these little ones 
the reverence for God and the church, which we seem in danger of los- 
ing. Do we treasure religion, and the things connected with it, as our 
forefathers did, when they, in order to be able to worship God in the 
way which seemed best to them, crossed the ocean, with all its dangers, 
and, through labor and toil, laid the foundation of our great republic, 
in which every religion is tolerated ? To them religion was life, and 
they were content to sit for hours, in bare, unlovely buildings, and on 
hard, uncomfortable seats, if only they might have the word of God 
explained. The minister was a great man in those days, and the peo- 
ple's affection for him was mingled with a feeling of reverence for his 
position as the chosen servant of God. Since then, we have adorned 
our churches with rich stained-glass windows, and we sit comfortably 
in seats whose slope is suited to our backs, but do we live our religion 
as they did in the former days, or has it degenerated into a mere pre- 
tence like so many other things ? The pessimist declares that people 
go to church now only because they are afraid their failure to do so 
will cost them their positions in society, or because they think that 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



their going will help them in a business way. This is a harsh state- 
ment, and one which we are unwilling to acknowledge, yet, when we 
look at the matter squarely, we realize that the hope of gain controls 
to some degree actions whose value should not be monetary nor social 
but spiritual, whose end is indeed gain but a gain which "the world's 
coarse thumb and finger fails to plumb," though it makes up the n\an's 
main account. 

The same spirit has infected the forming of friendships, and, too 
often, the most important consideration is not what a man is, but what 
he can do for us. The display of wealth and power is sufficient to make 
us bend the knee to its possessor, though, perhaps, in our heart of 
hearts, we may feel that his influence is used in ways which are far 
from beneficial. In politics, too, a man votes for the candidate who, 
he thinks, will be likely to favor the schemes which he, himself, is 
interested in. 

Every little service must be rewarded, and, very often, if the reward 
does not seem to be forthcoming, the service is tendered grudgingly. 
It has become a recognized custom to give small sums to servants for 
slight attentions, and, although efforts are being made, in some places 
to abolish this custom, it has gained such a hold upon our nation that 
it is very hard to rid ourselves of it. Indeed, it is a well-known fact 
that the railroads purposely give their porters smaller salaries because 
they know that the palms of these individuals will be well filled from 
the purses of the travelers. Is it any wonder, then, that Eudyard Kip- 
ling, in giving us his idea of Heaven, imagines it a place where the 
fortunate ones, after resting for a time, shall paint beautiful pictures, 

but where 

None but the Master shall praise them, 

And none but the Master shall blame, 
And no one shall work for money, 

And no one shall work for fame; 
But each for the joy of doing. 

And each, in his separate star, 
Shall draw the thing as he sees it, 

For the God of things as they are. 

Let us, then, think of these matters earnestly and seriously. 

We have in our development risen above our poverty and weakness, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 

and have become strong and prosperous, yet we must not let the star 
memories of the past ideals slip by us, but rather keep them with us 
that their light may shine in our hearts and cause the strong, the true, 
the noble instincts to rule our lives. 



The 1908 Valedictory. 



Bertha Belo Holman. 



As the representative of the Class of 1908, I have perhaps the hard- 
est of all tasks to perform, that of saying farewell. At this moment 
of parting everything seems to have become doubly dear. And although 
we are saying good-bye to our school days this morning, somehow we 
can not realize what it means, and perhaps will not until we have left 
St. Mary's, some of us forever, others to return after many years have 
passed away. As we separate to-day and each of us take our different 
paths, we carry with us a binding link of the past, the ideals of St. 
Mary's. These ideals, as it has been said, might well cause us as daugh- 
ters of St. Mary's to take for our motto, "Noblesse Oblige." that we 
may by these words be inspired to the higher and holier things of life, 
as the French were before us, while we are ever watching and praying 
for our Alma Mater. 

Still St. Mary's, the G-rove, the Chapel and the dear friends, who 
have become such a part of our lives, will always be among our sweetest 
memories. And now, in the name of the Class of 1908, I will not say 
"farewell," but "au revoir" and "may God be with you till me meet 
again." 



Pre-Commencement News. 



Pupils' Recitals, May 18 and 21. 

On the evenings of May 18 and 21, advanced students of the music 
department, pupils of Mr. and Mrs. Vincent, gave two pupils' recitals 
in the Auditorium with good effect. 

Except that Miss Gilmer's illness prevented her from taking her 



22 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



part, nothing marred the recitals in which each of the pupils acquitted 
herself with much credit and received well-deserved congratulations. 
Miss Martha Francis won especial praise by taking Miss Gilmer's num- 
bers as well as her own in the second recital, when called on in the 
emergency. 

The first recital was given by Misses Mildred Borden, Frances Bryan 
Broadfoot, and Jennie Belle Turner, pupils in Voice of Mrs. Vincent ; 
and Misses Alexina Hardy and Beatrice Sumter, pupils in Piano of 
Mr. Vincent. The second recital on the 21st by Misses Martha Fran- 
cis and Josephine Gilmer, pupils in Voice of Mrs. Vincent ; and Misses 
Elizabeth Smith and Margaret Williams, pupils in Piano of Mr. Vin- 
cent. 

The regular programs were as follows : 



I. 



Gluck 



Rubinstein 
Leoncavallo 

Sarakowski 



Aria "Divinites du Styx" from "Alceste" 
Mildred Borden 

(a) The Dream ...... 

(b) The Song of Musette from "La Boheme" 

Jennie Belle Turner 
Spanish Dance ...... 

Alexina Hardy 

(a) "Dost Thou Know that Sweet Land" from "Mignon Thomas 

(b) "A vesta portez vos offrandes" from "Polyeucte" . Gounod 

Frances Broadfoot 

Beethoven Sonata (first movement) Op. 10, No. 2 . Beethoven 

Beatrice Sumter 

Secchi 

Edith Dick 

Mildred Borden 



(a) Love Me or Not 

(b) Spring is Here . 



Mazurk d minor . 
Waltz Song — Morning 



Alexina Hardy 
Frances Broadfoot 



(a) Etude 

(b) Fantasie ...... 

Beatrice Sumter 
Aria "Omio Fernando" from "La Favorita" 
Jennie Belle Turner 
Trio (a) If My Songs had Airy Pinions. 

(b) Villanelle 



Godard 

Benoist 

Moscheles 
Gade 

Donizetti 

Reynolds Hahn 
Wekerlin 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



23 



II. 




(a) Schmetterling ....... 


Grieg 


(b) Marche Grotesque ...... 


Sinding 


Margaret Williams 




(a) My sweet repose ..... 


Schubert 


(b) Love me well ...... 


Bemberg 


(c) Ballata — "Volta la terrea alle stelle" from 




"Un Ballo un Maschera" .... 


Verdi 


Martha Francis 




Barcarole, a minor ...... 


Ehrlich 


Elizabeth Smith 




(a) Autumn ...... Mary 


Turner Salter 


(b) The Lamp of Love .... Mary 


Turner Salter 


(c) Ete 


Chaminade 


Josephine Gilmer 




Air de Ballet, Op. 30 


Chaminade 


Margaret Williams 




Aria "Bel raggio lushinghier" from "Semir amide" 


Rossini 


Martha Francis 




Liebestraum No. 3 . 


Liszt 


Elizabeth Smith 




Aria "Plus grand dans son obscurite" from 




"Queen of Sheba" ..... 


Gounod 


Josephine Gilmer 




Tarantelle for two pianos ..... 


Loewe 


Margaret Williams, Elizabeth Smith 





May 16th : The Dramatic Club in " A Wager." 

From the " Raleigh Evening Times ". 
Play at St. Mary's Hit of the Season. 

It is seldom that an amateur performance mates snch a hit as the 
play at St. Mary's did Saturday night. 

The Dramatic Club, assisted by Miss Cribbs, presented a present- 
day comedy, "A Wager." 

Too much can not be said in praise of the acting of the young ladies. 
Each one played her part in a whole-hearted manner that left nothing 
to be desired. The whole play was marked by its naturalness. It was 
well staged, scenery from the Academy of Music being used. Much 
merriment was furnished by Miss Adele Davidson, who played the part 
of the butler. The domestic affairs of Beatrice Woodbury, represented 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



by Miss Marguerite Thompson and James Woodbury, Miss Eloise Rob- 
inson furnished with amusement. Miss Elizabeth Smith as "Miss 
Sallie Allen" made an ideal aunt who was always ready to smooth over 
difficulties. Mjlss Esther (Rembert as "Margareit Hines^' and Miss 
Carmalt Grimes as "Charles Manning" were charming lovers. Miss 
Helen Daniel as "Thomas Woodbury" made the hit of the evening in 
her wooing of her sweetheart "Miss Budd," played by Miss Marjorie 
Brown. Miss Daniel made an ideal man and won not only the heart 
of her sweetheart, Miss Budd, but the heart of her audience as well. 

The beautiful auditorium was well filled with a delighted audience, 
who showed their pleasure and approval by hearty applause and fre- 
quent laughter. Many were heard to express the wish that they might 
see the performance again. 



Notes of the Faculty — The Old and the New. 



It has become something of a custom at St. Mary's to make no for- 
mal announcements of changes in the Faculty until after the Com- 
mencement is over, and as a result only a small part of the students and 
friends especially interested are more than partially informed of the 
changes before they scatter to their homes for the vacation. And 
though their special friends are aware of the plans of the old teachers 
the newcomers are not known in person until September. Since the 
revival of The Muse it has, however, been able to "tell the news" semi- 
officially in its June number and in the name of the students and of St. 
Mary's generally to extend greeting to those who are to take up their 
work here in September, and this news and greeting it is always a 
pleasure to give. 

Successive Rectors tell us that they look forward to the day when a 
Faculty shall continue on year after year with only the changes inci- 
dent to growth and development on the part of both School and teachers, 
but the day has not yet come and now each year witnesses the coming 
of a Faculty about one-fourth new. But while this year is no excep- 
tion to the number of changes the incoming teachers are only partly 
strangers, for in Misses Hull. Pixley and Jones, old friends are re- 



The St. Maky's Muse. 25 

turning to very familiar scenes and work, with, their energies only 
whetted to greater achievement by advanced study and teaching while 
away. 

Naturally the greatest interest and importance attaches to the change 
in Lady Principals and Directors of Music but the feeling is very dif- 
ferent from what it would be were the new Lady Principal and Director 
to be other than they are. for few indeed are the St. Maryans past or 
present who have not known and do not know and love Miss Thomas 
and Missi Dowd, appreciate and admire their work here, and rejoice 
at their well-deserved promotion. The withdrawal of Mrs. Sheib from 
the work is naturally deplored by her many friends who wish that she 
could continue with, the School and the tangible results of her energetic 
planning for the school a year ago will be in evidence many a year. 

There will be only slight changes for the next session in the Academic 
Faculty. Miss Thomas, while Lady Principal, will continue to direct 
the English, Mr. Stone the History and German, and Mr. Cruikshank 
the Latin and Science. Miss Jones will take Miss Smith's place in 
charge of the Mathematics and Miss Kellogg will replace Miss LaLoge 
in charge of the French. Miss Russell will have part of the English 
and History, and Miss Horsley will assist chiefly in Latin and English. 

In the Music Faculty, Miss Dowd assumes the Directorship, and 
Miss Scheper continues her teaching in Piano. Miss Hull and Miss 
Pixley come back invigorated by their year of study in Europe to their 
old places in Violin and Piano respectively, taking the places of Miss 
Peck and Miss Vedder. Miss Luney, the additional Piano teacher, 
will also play the organ in Chapel and teach that subject, and Miss 
Gtould takes up the Voice and Chorus work in Mrs. Vincent's place. 

There are no changes in the Art, Elocution or Business Departments 
and the only change among the officers is the retirement of Miss Bat- 
dorff and Mrs. Turner and the coming of Mrs. Leake as Housekeeper. 

The full list of the Faculty is published in the last pages of this 
Mtjse, but a little "personal news" of each may be interesting. 

The Rector and Mrs. Lay are not entirely decided on their summer 
plans. They will be at the Rectory during June and July, except for 
the frequent more or less brief trips which Mr. Lay has to make in con- 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



nection with his duties. The week after Commencement he made a 
three-day trip to Greenville and Greenwood, South Carolina, where 
he preached and met the people ; on Sunday, June 6th. he was in Ashe- 
ville where he preached the final sermon at the Commencement of the 
Asheville School for Boys, of which his friend, Mr. Chas. A. Mitchell, 
once a master at St. Paul's school, is principal; the week of the 15th 
with Mrs. Lay he attended the annual Council of the District of Ashe- 
ville at Morganton; and a little later he will make a trip North. In 
August the family may spend some weeks at the seashore or in the 
mountains, or they may be at St. Mary's. 

Miss Thomas remained for several days after the close of the session 
at the school, and then visited "Nell Wilson" at her home in Prince- 
ton, ]ST. J., f(or a few days before sailing for Europe. She was at 
Princeton for a part of the Commencement and had a splendid time. 
The members of Miss Fenner's foreign party met in New York on the 
10th and sailed the next day on the Oscar II, of the Scandinavian- 
American Line for Copenhagen where they are due to arrive about the 
21st. The party will reach New York on the return trip September 
6th and Miss Thomas will visit her relatives in Columbia and Green- 
ville, S. C. before taking up her duties at the School. 

Mr. Stone, Mrs, Stone and Florence will spend June at their home 
on Boylan Ave., and will then go as usual to Greensboro for the rest 
of the vacation to be with Mrs. Judge Dick, Mrs. Stone's mother. Mr. 
Stone always indulges in a variety of occupations during the summer 
and, needless to say, he will this summer "keep busy." 

Mr. Cruikshank remained at the School in connection with his duties 
as Secretary and Business Manager until the 20th when he went on a 
six weeks "wander." He expects to be back at St. Mary's about the 
first of August to take up again the work of preparation for the new 
session. 

Miss Russell expects to spend the summer at her home in Natchi- 
toches, La., and thereabouts, and Miss Cribbs with her family at Tus- 
caloosa, Ala. Miss Russell saw Frances Bottum and Wilmer Stone 
safely to New Orleans on the home trip. Miss Cribbs went home by 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 

way of Hendersonville, K C, where she greatly enjoyed a few days' 
visit. 

Miss Horsley, after visiting her sister in Lynchburg, Va., will spend 
most of her summer at the home of her brother-in-law in West Va. 

Miss McKimmon usually divides her summers between her sister, 
Mrs. W. L. Hawley, in Fayetteville, and her brother, Mr. Chas. Mc- 
Kimmon, in Raleigh, but the sudden death of her sister-in-law, Mrs. 
Jas. McKimmon, June 13th, called her from Fayetteville to Raleigh 
and she will at least for the present remain with her four nephews 
and nieces. 

Miss Dowd will spend most of the summer at her home in West Ral- 
eigh. As usual, her friend, Miss Saida Hanckel, of Charleston, S. C. 
will be with her during July and other friends from time to time. 
Mrs. Dowd, her mother, has been quite unwell since school closed but 
her health is now happily improved. 

Miss Scheper left no inkling of her intentions but quietly "subsided" 
to a peaceful summer at her home in Beaufort, S. C. 

Miss Fenner, as told elsewhere, is this summer chaperoning one of 
the Babcock parties touring Europe. She went from school to her home 
in Baltimore for a few days with her aunts, Misses Gerber, and then 
joined her party in New York. She will get back early in September. 

Miss Lee and Miss Sutton spent June at St. Mary's. Miss Lee and 
her mother have bought the house of Mr. Clarence Johnson, just oppo- 
site Mr. Stone's on B'oylan Ave., and they will move there July 1st. 
Her brother, Mr. Ed. Lee, who has been so ill all the winter has suf- 
ficiently recovered to be walking about and he, with his wife and son, 
have come to Raleigh from Greensboro and will live with Mrs. and 
Miss Lee for the present. Miss Sutton will be at St. Mary's nearly 
all summer. 

Miss Walton goes always as soon as school closes to her home in 
Morganton to be with her sisters and brother. She enjoys the rest and 
quiet thoroughly and was not tempted by an invitation to take charge 
of an Asheville Hospital for two months to give it up, and she deserves 
thoroughly the rest she gets. 

And now we turn to those who, while strangers to some, are well- 



28 The St. Maky's Muse. 



known to the "long-residents" at St. Mary's. So it is only for the 
sake of the recent comers that any sketch df them is of interest here. 

Miss Charlotte Hull, who will resume her work as teacher of Violin 
and director of the Orchestra is a graduate of the Chicago Musical Col- 
lege. Her home was near Chicago and she was educated there. She 
came to St. Mary's in 1902 and promptly established a reputation as an 
excellent teacher and a rare performer. She established and built up 
the Orchestra and made it a feature of the musical life of Raleigh. 
She spent the summer of 1906 abroad in study, and resigned her posi- 
tion here in May, 1907, to spend a year in study with the world-famed 
Sevcik, of Prague, Austria. She sailed with Miss Pixley in June, 
1907, and is expected back to America the latter part of this month. 
Her mother has been with her during the year abroad and will be with 
her in Raleigh. They will live in the city. Her return to the musical 
life of St. Mary's and the city is awaited with very pleasant anticipa- 
tion both in and out of the School. 

Miss Chelian Pixley, who resumes her work in Piano, after a year's 
absence, came to St. Mary's from her home in South Carolina in 1902 
to be with her aunt, Miss Emergene Schutt, then a teacher here and 
now of the Winthrop College faculty, and to teach in piano. She is a 
brilliant performer and a very successful teacher. While teaching here 
she studied in the summer at the Virgil Piano School, New York, and 
abroad, and has been the past year with Baumeister in Berlin. She 
will return with Miss Hull and spend the summer with her parents at 
Winnsboro, S. C. 

Miss Margaret Jones, who takes charge again of the Mathematics, 
has spent most of her teaching life at St. Mary's. She came here 
with her sister, Miss Mary Pride, when they were quite young, and 
they graduated together in '96. Then after a year in Alabama Miss 
Margaret came back as instructor, and taught here with marked success 
for several years. She then continued her studies for a year at Chapel 
Hill, and again resumed her work at St. Mary's. In 1906 she resigned 
the work to take up her studies again at Teachers' College, Columbia 
University, ISTew York. She continued there regularly for a year, 
went for a short time to Flushing Seminary as teacher of Mathematics 



The St. Mary's Muse. 29 

and since then has been living in New York, tutoring and substituting 
in Mathematics in the New York City High Schools. 

To tell a little about the newcomers : 

Miss Bertha M. Luney, of Coxsackie, N. Y., is the daughter of the 
Rev. Thos. H. Luney, an English clergyman, who has been for years 
the Rector of the Church at Coxsackie. She was educated at the 
Misses Tibbit's school in Hoosac and at the Misses Viator's school at 
Pomfret, Conn. She studied piano in these schools and afterward 
went to Syracuse University where she had piano under Prof. Hyatt 
and violin with Prof. Becker. Miss Luney had studied with Hyatt 
before he went to Syracuse and has kept up her studies with him up to 
the present. He is a Leipsig graduate and is now music master at 
St. Agnes's, Albany. Miss Luney studied violin also with Prof. Foote, 
of Troy, and with Becher, of Syracuse, who is a pupil of Loachim. In 
organ her teacher was Dr. Tipton, of the Albany Cathedral, who was a 
pupil of Startler. She has been playing in church for about twenty 
years and has been training choirs of both boys and girls during the last 
ten years. At St. Mary's she will play the organ in Chapel and assist 
in the training of choir and choruses, and will teach piano and organ. 

Miss Sara Gould, of East Orange, 1ST. J., is a New Jersey woman 
who has spent most of her life in the neighborhood of New York. Miss 
Gould after graduating from the East Orange High School in 1897 
Continued her musical training with various teachers in New York City 
and has been studying and teaching there practically ever since. Her 
voice is a mezzo-soprano. Her chief vocal work was done with Miss 
Florence Stevens, who afterward went to Paris and was a right-hand 
man with Jean de Reszke. She has done a great deal of studying in 
sight-singing and methods of quick reading. During her three years' 
course in sight-singing she led her teacher's chorus at Carnegie Hall, 
composed of women's voices, and she had five years experience in a 
women's chorus under Mr. Arthur Woodruff, one of the ablest con- 
ductors in this country. Miss Gould will have charge of the Voice 
and Chorus work here. 

Miss Georgiana Kellogg, who will have charge of the French next 
session, lives at present in New York City, but grew up in Helena, 



30 The St. Mart's Muse. 



Montana. She graduated from Smith College in 1904 and then went 
to Europe where she studied Trench and German for two years. Upon 
her return during the session 1906-07 she taught in Noble Institute, 
Anniston, Ala., and during the past year she has been tutoring and 
giving private lessons in New Jersey. 

Mrs. Katharine Leake, the new housekeeper, is a Kentuckian, whose 
work and home for the past year or two have been in Atlanta. She has 
had many years experience chiefly in the Higbie School, Kentucky, 
St, Mary's Hall, Bishop Garrett's St. Mary's at Dallas, Texas, and the 
Grady Hospital, Atlanta. She will take up her duties at St. Mary's 
August 15th. 

These brief sketches will serve as a partial introduction to individuals 
whom we hope to know well later on. And we would not forget those 
others whom we do know and admire who are now going from St. 
Mary's to work elsewhere. We regret that we are not in a position to 
tell their friends more of their plans in which they have the good wishes 
of us all. 

Mrs. Sheib writes from Asheville that she is feeling well and strong 
again and full of vigor for the life ahead of her. Her plans are not yet 
definitely settled. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent expect to spend the summer enjoying their 
summer home at Maranacook, Maine. 

Miss Peck and Miss Vedder are also summering at home, and Mile. 
La Loge will spend most of the vacation with her sister in New York. 

Mrs. Turner with Miss Jennie Belle left St, Mary's the Monday 
after school closed for a visit to her daughter in Atlanta; from there 
they went on to their home in Tuscaloosa where they will be with the 
other members of their family until the first of August when Mrs. 
Turner goes to Monteagle, Tenn., to take up her duties as housekeeper 
at Fairmount. 

Miss Batdorff remained at St. Mary's until the 18th, getting things 
straight, and then went for a brief vacation to her relatives in Pennsyl- 
vania before taking up her new work. 

And so we leave them all — old friends and new — and wish each of 
them a very pleasant, restful vacation. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 31 



St. Maryans Abroad. 



There seems to be an unusual exodus to Europe from this part of the 
country this summer and an unusual number of the travelers are con- 
nected more or less intimately with St. Mary's. While the first Pan- 
Anglican Conference is the especial attraction to Churchmen, many 
of the ladies are simply on their usual summer travel. The Pan- 
Anglican met in London the week of June 15th. 

Among others in attendance at the Pan-Anglican are Bishop and 
Mrs. Cheshire, Rev. Dr. and Mrs. E. B. Drane, of Edenton, Rev. and 
Mrs. A. B. Hunter, of St. Augustine's School, Rev. W. P. Witsell, of 
Columbia, S. C, Mr. and Mrs. D. Y. Cooper and the Misses Cooper, of 
Henderson, and Hon. R, H. Battle, of Raleigh. 

Miss Kate Shipp is abroad with a party which includes Misses 
Louise Wright, Fannie Hines Johnson, Emmie Drewry, Mary Shipp, 
and May and Annie Montague, of Raleigh, all ex-St. Mary's girls. 
The party sailed on June 2d from Philadelphia by the "Moltke" of the 
Hamburg-American Line for Gibraltar and Naples. 

Miss Fenner's party sailed from New York on June 11th by the 
"Oscar II," of the Scandinavian Line. In the party are Miss Fenner 
and Miss Thomas, of the St. Mary's Faculty, Miss Emily Garrison, '07, 
of Camden, S. G, Miss Kate Broadfoot, of Fayetteville, and Miss 
Bessie Woodard, of Raleigh, all "St. Mary's girls" while others in the 
party are Miss Pattie Carroll, of Raleigh, and Miss Laura Moore, of 
Gastonia. They land at Copenhagen and go to Norway to visit the 
Land of the Midnight Sun before taking up their tour of the continent. 

Mrs. M. T. Leak, of Durham, and her niece, Miss Annie Root, of 
Raleigh, and Miss Arabella Nash, of Tarboro, are also abroad. 



School Notes. 



Mr. Hodgson was prevented by sickness from making his usual 
Commencement trip to the school. He was much missed and his 
friends will be glad to know that he is now "himself again." He has 
had quite a wrestle with rheumatism the past year. 



32 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The photograph of Miss McVea, Class of 1884, later Lady Principal, 
which has just been added to the collection of framed photographs of 
the ladies who have from time to time presided over St. Mary's, which 
hangs in the Teachers' Reception Room, is much appreciated. The 
photograph shows Miss McVea in her academic dress, wearing her 
Master's hood. 

The girls would be much surprised now were they to come to St. 
Mary's to find the east and west ends of the Grove, with the exception 
of the paths and the tennis-courts, ploughed ground. Mr. lay is very 
anxious to help the trees and grass and will try to enrich the soil by 
fertilizer and a crop or two of cowpeas. By fall the green will be 
entirely restored to the campus. 

Mrs. Henry Lay, Bishop 1 Lay's widow and the Rector's mother, who 
has been such a welcome visitor to St. Mary's during the spring will re- 
main through June and then goes to Berkeley Springs, West Va., for 
the summer to be with her third son, Mr. Beirne Lay, who is a Master 
at St. Paul's School. 

The retirement of Dr. Winston from the presidency of the A. and 
M. College takes from active leadership in the educational field its 
most prominent figure in the schools of Raleigh. Following the going 
last year of Mr. DuBose, of President Jas. Dinwiddie, of Peace Insti- 
tute, and of Superintendent Moses, of the City Schools, President 
Winston's retirement marks the fourth change in administration in the 
city's educational institutions in a year. 

Frances Bottum writes entertainingly of her long trip home to far- 
off El Paso, Texas. "It was such a beautiful trip ; one rides through 
daisy fields one day and wakes up the next in ponds full of water-lilies 
and swamps full of willowy palms, with pools purple with water hya- 
cinths ; and goes to sleep again in rice fields. Then comes a long day's 
travel across the prairies, then there are canons and mountains that 
were once volcanoes. I have never seen so many wild flowers in my 
life ; they are just banked along the railroad in masses all the way from 
North Carolina to Texas." Miss Bottum's parents moved last fall from 
Greenville, S. C, to Texas, and this is her first trip to her new home. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 33 



At the recent Commencement of the Raleigh High School the St. 
Mary's Scholarship was awarded to Miss Virginia Pickel, the eldest 
daughter of Dr. J. M. Pickel, of the State Bureau of Chemistry, and 
granddaughter of Colonel Holladay, first president of the A. and M. 
College. Miss Pickel has won first honors throughout her high school 
course and will doubtless reflect credit on her school and herself in her 
work at St. Mary's. Prof. Hugh Morson, has worked for three years 
to make the Raleigh High School as good as any in the country and 
would not graduate a class until he had reached the standard he had 
set. This is the first graduating class and we look now for Raleigh 
High School graduates to enter St. Mary's and be able to graduate 
unconditioned in two years, a thing none of the graduates of any of the 
high schools have as yet been able to accomplish. 

A reminder of Miss Checkley and her successful work as Principal 
of Bishop Knight's Cathedral School for Girls, in Havana, Cuba, is a 
reception card received by her friends in May : 

"La Directora y las Maestras de "The Cathedral School for Girls" 
tienen el honor de invitar aVd. para temar un refresco en esta Escuela 
el 19 de Mayo, a las cinco de la tarde bosta las siete." 

Vedado, Mayo 16 de 1909. 

Lillian Farmer, '07, reports a very satisfactory year's experience in 
teaching at McClellansville, S. C. She says: "I have found this 
place perfectly charming in every way. The teachers are quite 'the 
thing, and I have simply had a 'dandy time.' The work I have found 
very pleasant. Of course it is trying at times but the patrons are so 
sympathetic, and the children are all well-raised and refined so that 
I have escaped the worries that many teachers have." On her way to 
her home in Florence, ,Miss Farmer passed through Georgetown and 
saw Paula and Minnie Hazard there ; an interesting coincidence that 
the three "Xiles Medal" winners should thus accidentally be thrown 
together and in their native South Carolina. 

Julia Mclntyre reached home safely only to waken next day in the 
cluthes of her old foe, poison ivy. Her mother sent her straightway 
to her uncle, who has a summer home, for a rest-up. We all hope that 



34 The St. Maby's Mttse. 



she will be all right again and be able to enjoy the rest of the vacation 
with her "home-folks." 

While it was such a pleasure at this Commencement to have Elizabeth 
Waddill back and able to graduate with her Class, the absence of Sadie- 
belle McGrwigan, who was a member of the class through the Sopho- 
more year, and though forced to be away through her Junior year, had 
hoped to come back and graduate, was a source of genuine regret. Miss 
McGwigan spent last year at the Woman's College in Richmond to be 
in her physician's care and her health would not permit of her return so 
she had to spend this year too in Richmond. She writes: "The invi- 
tation to Commencement makes me homesick for St. Mary's, and the 
class of '08. It all seems strange now to think that two years ago I 
was looking forward with so much pleasure to this time when I should 
be a Senior at St. Mary's. I am sorry that my dreams could not 
come true, still taking everything into consideration I suppose it is well 
that I came to Richmond. I see from the Muse that Elizabeth Wad- 
dill will graduate. I am so glad she could keep up her Avork and re- 
turn. Even if not a member of the class, I would like so much to be 
there for the exercises but our Commencement comes almost at the 
same time. The Class has my best wishes." 

The annual Mttse aroused the usual burst of interest and a few rash 
persons even think it "better than last year's." The Class of '07, how- 
ever, set a high standard that requires both money and material to at- 
tain to and there was no effort made this year to excel the standard. 
As Miss Serena Bailey writes: "It is pretty and interesting." The 
pictures are unusually good and the book makes a very pretty souvenir 
of the year. A more critical view is that of another wellwisher whose 
opinion it would be well for future editors to consider though the views 
were not intended for publication. She writes: "I have studied the 
Muse from end to end and think it is a fine edition. The cover is very 
nice, indeed, and the paper likewise; no advertisements is overpower- 
ingly grand. But I hope with all those "old-time" teachers at St. 
Mary's next year, that some of the eating-clubs will be cut out, or at 
least not brought so prominently forward as a feature of the school, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 35 

according to the Muse. I must be getting old, indeed, when I fail to 
be interested in such clubs, but it is so, and I always want S. M. S. to 
be just a little nicer than that." (This is candid and well-advised 
criticism, though it might be well to say for the benefit of those who do 
not know, that the important phrase is "according to the Muse" as the 
"eating-clubs'' are featured in the annual and not the school-life, so it 
is an in justice to St. M.'s to make it appear otherwise.) 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1908. 

Georgia Stanton Hales, Editor-in-Chief. 

Eva Rogerson, Annie C. Wood, Rebecca Hill Shields, Minnie Leary, 

Sallie Haywood Battle, Alice Leigh Hines. 

Ida Jean Rogerson and Mary C. Shuford, Business Managers. 



EDITORIAL. 



The Commencement of 1908. 



The June Muse is planned to reach its readers as early as possible 
after the close of the session. In telling of the Commencement season 
it aims to bring as well as it can the various scenes of the week to the 
eyes and ears of those daughters and friends of St. Mary's who have 
not been fortunate enough to be able to be present to see and hear in 
person, and to record the events of the week in such form that those who 
have been present may be able to refresh their memories of the happy 
occasions when memory of details tends to grow dim. 

We leave the account printed elsewhere to tell its own story. We 
rejoice that as many Alumnae were able to be present and would assure 
those who could not be with us that we were thinking of them and 
hoping they w 7 ere with us in sjnrit. 



The Muse Editors. 



With this June number begins the twelfth volume of the monthly 
Muse, and the fourth volume since its revival in 1904. The publica- 
tion has not grown in strength as it should, nor received all the support 
of which its supporters have considered it worthy, but it has made many 
friends, done some little toward furthering the interests of the school 



The St. Mary s Muse. 37 

and in keeping the alumna?, or such part of them as it can reach, in 
touch with the school life, and it still clings to the purpose for which 
it was revived. 

Instead of choosing a new Board of Editors this spring it was deemed 
best to continue over the old Board until October when the new yeai 
will be in swing and a better adjustment can be made. The only 
changes therefore to be announced at this time are the promotion of 
Misses Ida Eogerson and Shuford to be Business Managers, Miss Hen- 
derson having finished her course, and the appointment of Miss Frances 
Bottum as Art Editor. 

There will be three special points toward which special effort will be 
directed during the publication of the Muse of the next year: 

(1) In order to make the business side of the publication more as- 
sured to add to the list of subscribers at least 150 new subscriptions 
of the Alumna?. 

(2) To improve the general quality of the magazine by an earnest 
effort to have more and better contributions from the student-body. 

(3) To improve the Alumna? Department by more general contribu- 
tions, insured if possible by regular correspondents in the several 
Alumna? centers. 

Will every well-wisher of the Muse help a little this summer by talk- 
ing over these three points with their friends ? 

The Class of 1908. 

The Graduation Averages are not announced at the Commencements 
but are printed in the Muse for record and for general comparison. 
Final averages at St. Mary's are at present based on the record of the 
last two years, the Junior and Senior Years. 

The individual standing this year was : 

* Elizabeth Waddill 96 . 01 

1. Bertha Holman 90 . 50 

2. Marguerite Thompson . 86 . 03 

3. Isabel Hanna 82 . 00 

4. Marguerite LeCron 80.80 

* Miss Waddill was away from St. Mary's the first three-quarters of her Senior Year, and though she 
did equivalent work she was of course debarred from Class Honors. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ceuikshank - - - - Alumnse Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
VTrB"-PKw<5TT>w>rT>5 J Mrs - L M - Pittenger, Raleigh, 

VICE PRESIDENTS, i M] . g j, p Tucker] R a l e igh, 

(.Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



Looking Backward. 



1908—1898. 

An account of the Commencement exercises of 1798, the 56th Com- 
mencement, just ten years ago, brings to our notice at this time several 
points of special interest. Dr. Bennett Smedes was presiding over the 
exercises for the first time as Rector of the Church's school as he had 
long presided over the Church school, and was re-elected by the Trustees 
to what was to prove the last year of his Rectorship for he died the fol- 
lowing February. 

The Valedictorian of the year was Miss Kate McKimmon Hawley, 
of Fayetteville, who rejoiced "Miss Katie's" heart that year by her 
honors and which made that an especially happy season for her aunt, 
"Miss Katie," whose name she bears. As Mrs. M. R. Bacon, of 
Albany, Ga., she has been for several years in the "home of her own," 
where Miss Katie's affections center on "little Billie," but her thoughts 
still run back to Alma Mater. 

The Salutatorian was Miss Sarah Smedes Root, (Mrs. Watkins Ro- 
bards), grand-daughter of the Founder, a fact lending additional in- 
terest to the year. 

The address to the Graduates was by Rev. T. M. 1ST. George, of New 
Bern, who passed away this spring in the prime of his usefulness in 
his field at Marietta, Ga. He was later to serve St. Mary's faithfully 
as a Trustee, and to be still closer linked to its interests through the 
school-life of his daughter, Elmer, who finished her course here in 1905. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 39 



Probably most important of all this was the year marked by the visit 
of Dr. A. T. Porter and Dr. A. P. Frost, of Charleston, as representa- 
tives of the Diocese of South Carolina, who came to inspect the school, 
to secure information, study the plans, etc., and report to the South 
Carolina Council with a view to South Carolina adopting St. Mary's as 
its Diocesan School, which step all will remember after a favorable 
report from these gentlemen was taken by the South Carolina Council 
in 1899. 

But equally true of previous and subsequent Commencements is the 
paragraph from the newspaper report: "There were mothers present, 
many of them, who saw class honors and distinctions and diplomas 
descend upon their daughters, who stood upon the very spot upon which 
they had stood in years gone by and received like honors and distinc- 
tions. There w T ere even grandmothers who could recall some summer 
day long ago, when they too had stepped out from the class room and 
paused just long enough on this historic rostrum, to be crowned with 
class honors — ere they turned into the paths that led into mature 
womanhood, and through the sunshine and shadows of after years." 
(Which is a very pretty idea that we remember year by year, though 
some inaccuracies in this statement can readily be perceived.) 

In concluding the glimpse we naturally think of the Class whose 
Commencement this was: 

Olive L. Armstrong (Mrs. Geo. D. Crow) Wilmington, N. C. 

Frances Hawks Cameron (Mrs. Chas. Burnett) U. S. A. 

Josephine Belle Gulley Raleigh, N. C. 

Sally Harris 

Kate McK. Hawley (Mrs. M. R. Bacon) Albany, Ga. 

Jessamine May Higgs ( Mrs. Henry C. Walter ) Washington, D. C. 

Annie Shaw Tarboro, N. C. 

Margaret H. Smedes (Mrs. John I. Rose) Durham, N. C. 

Sarah Smedes Root (Mrs. Watkins Robards) Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary G. Smith (Mrs. M. H. Holmes) Union, S. C. 

Ethel Worrell Norfolk, Va." 

1908—1878. 

It is something of a coincidence that entirely independently there 
should have come to the Muse at this time the clipping giving the 
account of the Commencement of 1898 and the little year-book issued 
by Dr. Smedes as a catalogue giving the announcements for 1878-79 



40 The St.* Maky's Muse. 

and the awards of 1878. For many years these little books were issued 
by the Drs. Smedes, growing from a simple four-page leaflet into the 
Bulletin of today. Copies of practically none of them are preserved 
at the school and this little one of 1878, a pamphlet of twenty pages, 
pocket size, with a modest cover of light gray, has become available 
through the interest of Miss M. E. Tarrh, of Florence, an old St. 
Mary's girl who has been .constant in her helpful interest in the Muse 
and who found it among her papers. 

Dr. Smedes counted by half-years instead of years and so his an- 
nouncement that the "73rd Term begins September 12, 1878," meant 
that the 72d Term (3Gth Year) had just concluded. The session ran 
then from Sept. 12th to June 19th, with the one holiday at Christmas; 
about the same length as in the present. Bishop Atkinson and Bishop 
Lyman, both living then, were the "Visitors," "The Rev. Bennett 
a. I\i.," "Rector and Principal," and "Mrs. Kate deRosset 
Meares, Lady Principal." 

The "Corps of Teachers" included: 

Rev. Bennett Smedes Mathematics, Mental and Moral Philosophy and 

Natural Science. 

Mrs. Mary Iredell History, English, Grammar, Penmanship, etc. 

Miss E. J. Czarnomska German, Belles Lettres, and Elocution. 

Miss Kate McKimmon Assistant in English Studies. 

Miss G. D. Fowlkes Assistant in English Studies. 

Mile. LeGal French Department. 

Miss M. E. Hall Drawing and Painting. 

Mr. Will H. Sanborn In charge of Musical Department. 

Miss Stella V. Shaw Piano, Harp, and Guitar. 

Mrs. V. 0. Pugh Matron of the Sick. 

Mrs. A. E. Slater Dancing and Calisthenics. 

After stating the "Terms," which vary little from those of the pres- 
ent day and giving a very brief account of. the "Situation, Buildings, 
etc.," there follow the Course of Study, and announcements of the 
Departments of Music and Art. Then comes the "Rector's Circular" 
which we should like to quote in full in order that both the similarities 
and differences after these thirty years might be noted. Dr. Smedes 
had then been in charge a little more than a year. He writes: 

St. Mary's School was founded by the late Rev. Aldert Smedes, D.D., in 1842, 
and continued for thirty-five years under his fostering care, pursuing a career of 
prosperity and usefulness unexampled in the South. Upon his death in April, 1877, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 41 

the government of the school devolved upon his son, the Rev. Bennett Smedes, A.M., 
who for sixteen years was associated with him in the conduct of the School. 

It is his aim and intention so to conduct the School that it shall continue to main- 
tain the high reputation it has always enjoyed as a seat of intellectual culture, of 
religious training and instruction, and of all refining influences. To this end he 
will continue to employ all the means heretofore used, adding from time to time 
such new methods and appliances as may be demanded by the advancing standard of 
education. None but teachers of experience and acknowledged ability are employed 
in its various departments. They all reside in the institution, sit at the same board, 
partake of the ame domestic privileges and enjoyments, and contribute their best 
exertions toward promoting the cheerfulness and social improvement of the family. 

The Course of Instruction embraces the studies of young children as well as those 
of the most advanced pupils at school and college. The solid and fundamental 
branches are taught carefully and systematically by ladies whose names have been 
so long favorably known in connection with St. Mary's as to need no word of com- 
mendation here. During the past year special attention has been paid to Composi- 
tion, Literature and Elocution, with the most gratifying results. . . . 

Extravagance in dress is opposed to the principles of the School. . . . Light 
literature is positively prohibited. . . . The frequent reception of boxes of eat- 
ables is much to be deprecated. 

But while this School strives diligently to promote the health and happiness of 
its pupils, and their improvement in mind, manners and accomplishments, it is 
especially solicitous to promote their growth in grace and in the knowledge and love 
of our Lord Jesus Christ. To this end it applies assiduously all the sacred instru- 
mentalities of the Church of which it is a handmaid, deeming the training of its 
pupils in the nurture and admonition of the Lord to be the most acceptable service 
it can render to them, to their parents, and to God. 

The "Catalogue, 1877-78" contains 113 names, many of them still 
very familiar. Though "graduation" had not then been instituted, the 
first "class" graduating in 1879, we find the announcements ending 
with the "Eoll of Honor" and "Specially Commended" : 

1878. 

Roll of Honor. 

1st Distinction. 

Lucy Plummer Battle 98.9 

Ella G. Tew 98.6 

Annie Augusta Wood . . . 98.5 

Sophronia Horner . 98.4 

Janie Outlaw Allen 98.0 

Louise Porcher Allston . ., 98.0 

Mary Elizabeth Wood 98.0 



Samt Mary's School Library 



42 The St. Mary's Muse. 

and then the list of "2d Distinction" who had made the mortifying 
averages of less than 97 per cent, though they were happy in having 
more than 95 per cent. 



Peebles — Bo wen. 

Jackson, X. C.j June 9. — The Church of the Saviour, of this place, was the scene 
of the most brilliant wedding of the season, when Mr. Calvert G. Peebles and Miss 
Julia S. Bowen were united in the holy bonds of matrimony. The church was beau- 
tifully decorated with white roses, Southern smilax and ferns. 

At the appointed hour, 9 o'clock p. m., Miss Margaret Stedman, of Raleigh, N. C, 
rendered Schubert's Serenade. Mr. Edmund Hoyt Harding, of Washington, X. C, 
played the wedding march. To the first strains of the wedding march came the 
guests of honor, in their wedding dresses, carrying white service books: Mrs. Lewis 
W. Langhorn, of Salem, Va. ; Mrs. Kenneth G. Henry, of Choeowinity, X. C. ; Mrs. 
Sam. P. Boddie, of Louisburg, X. C.j Mrs. Garland Midyette and Mrs. G. Pollok 
Burgwyn, of Jackson, X. C. Then the ushers: Mr. H. K. Burgwyn, of Jackson, 
X. C; Mr. Russell Burton, of Portsmouth, Va. ; Mr. T. J. Peebles, of Jackson, N. C; 
Mr. T. X. Webb, of Hillsboro, X. C. ; Mr. G. Pollok Burgwyn, of Jackson, and 
Mr. James Calvert, of Xorfolk, Va. Then the bridesmaids, in white China silk, 
carrying pink sweet peas: Misses Burgwyn, Josephine and Bland Bowen, of Jackson, 
X. C; Miss Mary Phillips, of Battleboro, X. C. Then the maids of honor: Misses 
Harriet and Ellen Bowen, sisters of the bride, in sun-plaited pink silk, carrying 
La France roses, followed by Miss Laura Clark, of Scotland Xeck, X. C, in white 
batiste, carrying the white prayer-book from which the service was read. Then the 
bride entered with her father. She wore panne crepe with embroidered fillet lace 
trimmings and carried a shower boquet of bride's roses and lilies of the valley. 
They were met at the altar by the groom and his best man, Mr. George P. Urquhart, 
of Suffolk, Va. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Francis Joyner, Rector, 
assisted by the Rev. W. T. Picard, Deacon in charge. Master Fred. P. Barrow, of Port 
Xorfolk, Va., and Miss Julia Calvert, of Jackson, were ribbon bearers. 

Following the ceremony a most delightful reception was given at the home of the 
Hon. W. C. Bowen. Mr. and Mrs. Peebles left for an extended tour in the Xew 
England States and Canada. They will be at home to their friends after July 1st, 
at the historic home of Mr. Peebles, "Grape Hill." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 43 



tEfje Jfacultp anb <&llittv& of g>t. JWarp's! 

1908=1909. 



Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector. 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal. 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Secretary. 



CfjE gJcabemic Department. 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Bible, Ethics, and Greek. 

(A.B. , Yale, 1882; B.D. , General Theological Seminary, 1885. Mas- 
ter in St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., 1888-1907; Rector of St. 
Mary's, 1907—) 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS English and Literature. 

(A.M. , College for Women, S. C. , 1900; graduate student, Columbia 
University, N. Y., 1905. Instructor, Greenville College, S. C, 1904; 
instructor in St. Mary's, 1900-1904; 1905—) 

WILLIAM E. STONE History and German. 

(A.B. , Harvard, 1882. Principal, Edenton, N. C, Academy, 1900-02; 
master in Porter Academy, Charleston, 1902-03; instructor in St. 
Mary's, 1903—) 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Latin and Science. 

(A.B. , Washington College Md., 1897; A.M., 1898; graduate student 
Johns Hopkins University, 1900. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1903—) 

Miss SCHARLIE E. RUSSELL English and History. 

(Graduate State Normal School, Natchitoches, La. Instructor in St. 
Mary's, 1907 -) 

Miss MARGARET M. JONES Mathematics. 

(Graduate, St Mary's, 1896; student, University, N. C. , 1900; student, 
Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1906-07. Teacher, New 
York City High Schools, 1907-0S; instructor in St Marv's, 1897-1900; 
1900-1906; 1908—) 

Miss GEORGINA KELLOGG French. 

(A.B. , Smith, 1904 ; student in Europe, 1904-06. Instructor, Noble 
Institute, Ala., 1907; instructor in St. Mary's, 1908—) 

Miss YANITA CRIBBS Expression and Physical Culture. 

(Tuscaloosa College; University of Ala. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1905 — ) 

Miss MABEL A. HORSLEY Preparatory Work. 

(Graduate Powell's School, Richmond, Virginia. Assistant in St. 
Mary's, 1907—) 

Miss KATE McKIMMON Primary School. 

(Student and teacher at St. Mary's since 1861.) 



44 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Jfflustc department. 

Miss MARTHA A. DOWD, Director { 5??°' Th ?°i!7' • 

' \ History of Music. 

(Graduate of St. Mary's, 1884; pupil of Kuersteiner, Sophus Wiig, 
Albert Mack. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1886—; Director of Music, 1908—.) 

Miss CHELIAN A. PIXLEY Piano. 

(Pupil of E. C. Schutt, of Moskowski in Paris, 1906, and of Burmeister 
in Berlin, 1907-08. Certificate teacher, Virgil Clavier Method. 
Teacher in St. Mary's, 1902-07; 1908—.) 

Miss HERMINE P. SCHEPER Piano, Harmony. 

(Graduate New England Conservatory; private student, New York 
City. Teacher. Converse College S. C, Hamilton Institute, Wash- 
ington; Elizabeth College, N. C. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1907—.) 

Miss BERTHA MAY LUNEY Piano, Organ. 

( Pupil of Hyatt and Becker at Syracuse University ; Foote of Troy ; 
and Tipton, of the Albany Cathedral. Teacher in St. Mary's, 
1908—.) 

Miss CHARLOTTE K. HULL Violin. 

(Graduate Chicago Musical College; pupil in Paris of Viardot, 1906; 
pupil in Prague of Sevcik. 1907-08. Teacher of Violin, etc., and 
Director of Orchestra at St. Mary's, 1902-07; 1908—.) 

Miss SARA GOULD Voice. 

(Pupil of Arthur Woodruff, Stanley Peck, C. L. Safford and others; 
Grad. Carnegie School of Sight Singing; member of the Musical Art 
Society; teacher of the Italian, French and DeReszke methods. In- 
structor in the Misses Underbill's School. East Orange; Miss Burt's 
School, N. Y., etc. Teacher in St. Mary's, 1908—.) 



&rt department. 

Miss CLARA I. FENNER, Director f Drawing, Painting, 

1 Design, etc. 

(Graduate Maryland Institute, School of Art and Design; special 
student Pratt Institute, 1905; special student in Paris, 1907. Direc- 
tor of Art, St. Mary's, 1888-96; 1902—.) 



(Expression ^Department. 

Miss YANITA CRIBBS, Director Expression. 

(University of Alabama. Director of Expression, 1905 — .) 



business ©epartment. 

Miss LIZZIE H. LEE, Director,... \ Stenography, Typewriting, 

' | Bookkeeping. 
(Director of the Department, 1896—.) 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Assistant. 

(Instructor in St. Mary's, 1898—.) 



The St. Mary's Muse. 45 



®iiwv$, 1908=09. 



Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector. 

Miss ELEANOR W. THOMAS Lady Principal. 

Mrs. KATHARINE LEAKE Housekeeper. 

Miss LOLA E. WALTON Matron of the Infirmary. 

Dr. A. W. KNOX School Physician. 

Mrs. MARY IREDELL Visitor. 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Business Manager. 

Miss LIZZIE H. LEE Bookkeeper. 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Stenographer. 



Calendar for 19A8 

Session of 1908=09 

September 14, Monday . Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 
September 15-16 . . . Registration and Classification of 

City Pupils. 
September 16-17 . . . Registration and Classification of 

Boarding Pupils. 
September 17, Thursday Advent Term Opens at 10.30 A. M. 
November 1, Sunday . . All Saints ; Founders' Day ; Holy 

Day. 
November 19, Thursday . Second Quarter begins. 
November 26, Thursday . Thanksgiving Day ; holiday, spent 

at school. 
December 18, Friday . . Christmas holiday begins at 

3.15 p. m. 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



With this number the fifth year of the publication of the Muse 
under its present policy begins. The publishers would appreciate a 
remittance of subscriptions from those subscribers who have not yet 
sent the dollar. 

Bound copies of Volume XII of the Muse may be obtained from 
the publishers by any one wishing a copy as a souvenir of the year. 
Price: $1.50. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO, 



Dry Goods 

OP ALT, KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES ££» SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptiy. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 
BANKING. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
W. N. Jones. Vice-President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier 
J. B. Timberlake, Ass't Cashier. 

All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe. Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, 
Surplus, > 
Deposits, 

Assets, 



$ 100,000.00 

100,000.00 

1,175.000.00 

1,500,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 

superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of flue church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 



Sample copies of the Muse will be mailed 
to Alumnse at any time on request. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

" Let there be light " 
Raleigh Construction Company, 
Electric Contractors and Engineers. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 

Fancy Groceries, 

Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

Millinery. 

St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



I. C. STRONACH'S SONS CO. 



GROCER© 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



The School authorities will be glad to mail on request the current St. 
Mary's Bulletins, with full information about the school. 

Bulletin 9, General Information (Catalogue). 
Bulletin 11, Academic Courses and Announcements. 
Bulletin 3, Scholarships. 
Bulletin 7, Historical Sketch. 



. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROC ERS 

"WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 


1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 


For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 






Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 1ST. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 


T. W. BLAKE, 
Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 


WE WANT your patronage in everything in 


Repairing promptly done. 


the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVERTHORN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 


JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



St. Mary's Seal Stationery, 
St. Mary's Seal Pins, 
St. Mary's Pennants, 
St. Mary's Calendars, 
May be had by writing to The Muse. 



HINES BROS, LUMBER CO., 

KlNSTON, N. C, 

Manufacturers of 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QTJINN & CO. 

Leading Florists op North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 


Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 
Lumber. 


H. STEIN METZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds . 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 


ROBT. SIMPSON, Drn " B S82BBS5 etc. 






Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 


ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 


ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


121 Fayetteville Street. 


/g^BROUGKTQl^ 

ff/PRI^TLNG COM) 

vV am -^s.^!Xw ml r 


J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


W. B. MANN, 
11 E. Hargett St, Raleigh, N. C. 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 


HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 
"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 


H. T. HICKS CO. 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 


PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



Sixty-seventh Session of St. Mary's 

opens 

Thursday, September 17, 1908. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 


THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 


BARRETT & THOMPSON, 


Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 


Architects and Engineers, 
raleigh, n. c. 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 


PBNN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 
R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 


ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
John T. Pullen, Pres. Charles Root, Cash'r* 
Capital 815,000. Surplus 850,000. Deposits over 
$750,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 
COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited. 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


POWELL & POWELL, 
COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 



liviate-, Healthy and Salubriow. 



ary's School, 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



for girls and young women). 



SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 17, 1908. 



IHViDEl) ; INTO TWO IEEMS, I 



these 



)bgqrtxnentis 



1. THE COLLEGE. _ ■/_■;_ .;■ : ;V;.- 
r if-^0 MW&%' SCHOOL.,, 

£ THE BUSINESS SCHOOL./ 2 , 

'fTkEA'm sciiooL. 

5. 1HE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



Twenty-five Members of the Faculty. 



jrnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment: New. -twenty-eight 
,. P^tbSi^M^P^ /(no be and Steinwuy Grand Pianos 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slfght 

W&£ RECTOR: 






©ctober, 1908 




IRalefeb, *W. (C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



OPENING NUMBER. 



Vol. XIII. October, 1908. No. 2 



God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, this School 
with Thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with the light of the 
everlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; increase in us true 
religion; nourish us with all goodness; and of Thy great mercy keep us in the 
same, O blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the Son, together, we worship 
and glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 



The Opening of St. Mary's. 



The sixty-seventh session of St. Mary's School opened at 10.30 on 
Thursday morning, September seventeenth, with service in the chapel. 

The processional was the hymn so often sung at St. Mary's on days 
of especial mark, — "Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty." The 
morning service was read by the Rector, who also formally declared 
that the session of 1908 had begun. After the singing of another 
favorite hymn, "O Mother, Dear Jerusalem," — bringing on this first 
day of school longing thoughts of the homes so recently left — Bishop 
Cheshire made a short address, in which he gave warm welcome to 
pupils and to teachers, especially to those among the latter who were 
returning to the school after an absence of a year or more, and spoke 
of the aim of St. Mary's to look to its pupils' bodily welfare and mental 
and spiritual growth and development. The recessional was "The 
Church's One Foundation." 

While the Thursday service was the formal opening of school, for 
several days previous pupils and teachers had been gathering and a 
goodly amount of work had been done. The Faculty had met on Mon- 
day evening, and on the three following days, pupils were being regis- 
tered, examined and classed. The new pupils were guided to the Art 
Building, where the heads of the various departments held examina- 



58 The St. Mary's Muse. 



tions — examinations not nearly so formidable as the frightened girls 
expected, but nevertheless effective in determining that perhaps this 
timid girl knew more than she herself had believed, or that the more 
confident new-comer conld speak accurately not of the substance of the 
interior of her last text-book, but only of the color of its exterior. The 
"old girls," meanwhile, were finding that the first days at school had 
for them adequate excitement, for old friends were to be greeted, new 
acquaintances formed, and explorations of discovery to be made, for 
every long vacation, some improvement takes place at St. Mary's, and 
this year all were delighted with the installation of electric lights in all 
buildings, besides the making of new tennis courts behind the audito- 
rium, and the improvement in the flower beds in front of the Main 
Building, the beds now being bright with red sage and scarlet geraniums. 
By Friday, classes met and the regular routine of school life began, 
so that we felt that the stir of the opening was over and work had begun ' 
in earnest. T. 



A Relic of the War. 



MINNIE TAMPLET HAZARD. 



The dreary monotony of a December snow had exhausted almost all 
of the resources for amusement that the child Helen possessed, and, as 
always at such times, she sought the gentle aunt, who never turned a 
deaf ear to her baby complaints. And so it was that the little maiden 
lady, heedless, of the light tap on her door, was surprised from her 
revery before the open fire by the unexpected entrance of small Helen. 

"Auntie 'Lisbeth, I's so " But the complaint remained un- 
finished, for the child's eye had caught the gleam of something that 
was beautiful and golden against the black dress. The little lady was 
seeking to cover it hastily with some papers in her lap ; but she was 
not quick enough, for the child with innocent gayety caught it in her 
small hands. A lock of hair it was ; and the glow from the fire falling 
upon it showed it golden with just a tinge of auburn. Something 
there was that seemed to still the mirth of the little one; and, with a 



The St. Mary's Muse. 59 



kind of awe, she placed the ringlet in the delicate, blue-veined hand 
eagerly outstretched, begging in almost a whisper to know what and 
whose it was. At the seizure of her treasure the little lady had uttered 
a low cry ; but the change in the child's manner caused her to hesitate 
as she was about to place the curl in a yellow-stained envelope. She 
turned from the young eyes raised to hers to the snow-ladened boughs 
of the oaks waving in the wind without. Then she spoke in a low, 
musical voice. 

"Little Helen, I will tell you a story. Once there was a young sol- 
dier who loved a girl." 

"Auntie, was that girl pretty V interrupted the child, for she had 
noticed the absence of the adjective. 

There was a moment's pause when a faint flush spread over the 
sweet old face, before the answer came, "Yes, baby, she was pretty. 
We won't say just how she looked, but she had golden hair with curls 
in it. And when the soldier went off to fight, she gave him one — the 
one he thought the most beautiful, that used to fall across her brow at 
times." The little lady was talking almost dreamily, her eyes now 
fastened on the lock of hair caressed by. the fire's glow. "And," she 
went on, "he kissed her and went away. And he did not ever come 
back again, because a ball from a gun struck him, and he died. This 
is the curl he wore, and it is bloody on the end, for it was .near the 
wound." The little lady stopped speaking. 

"Auntie 'Lisbeth," murmured the child, "what was the pretty lady's 
name?". 

"They used to call her 'Betty,' little one. 

"And did she die when the soldier did V 

"Yes, the girl died." Again the little lady talked as to herself. 

Unhindered the child took the lock in her hands and caressed it; 
but just then came the sound of voices calling her. 

"The pretty, pretty hair," she murmured ; and went out, her child's 
eyes wide with the wonder and mystery of it all. 



60 The St. Mart's Muse. 



The Sign. 



VIRGINIA RANDOLPH ROLLING PICKEL. 



It was examination day at Bowles' Academy. In the schoolroom 
the boys and girls sat at desks, one behind the other, with ink and 
erasers and paper and blotters piled around. Doctor Bowles stood at 
the blackboard writing. It was the Latin examination. All who 
wished to progress from Sophomore to Junior class must take this ex- 
amination; must tell how Cassar built the bridge, or why the Helvetii 
migrated from their native Alps. The Latin sentences on the board 
grew rapidly under the Doctor's hand. How searching the questions 
were ! How easily the Doctor could find knowledge or the lack of it ! 
The silence was unbroken save for the scratch of pens, or the sharpen* 
ing of pencils, or the noise as the pupils went up to ask had their 
teacher written corium or cornu, or whether question number 2 fol- 
lowed question number 1, and so on. It was time for the passage of 
translation now. Doctor Bowles wrote the first lines of the Second 
Book of Ca?sar on the board. Suddenly one of the boys gave a sicken- 
ing, guilty start, and tried to shove a book under his desk. The Doctor 
towered indiginantly above him. 

a Go take your seat on the front bench," commanded he in an awful 
voice," and take no more part in this examination." 

It was cheating detected. The boy went up to the front bench and 
sat there idly, turning around to smile weakly in the faces of those 
schoolmates who were kindhearted enough not to spurn a fallen brother 
but to smile faintly in return. 

The work continued. The boys and girls were getting on to the 
last part of the examination ; the smudges on the papers became more 
frequent ; the fingers were stained with ink. It was the "frazzled-out" 
stage, when the children were getting hungry and their bodies felt 
cramped and their minds had lost their freshness. Recklessness was 
rife, whether it took the form of less careful answers or freer giving 
and taking of assistance. The bad influences of the hour were felt by 
all, but particularly by one of the girls. The temptation to take help 
hardly came to her, but, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 61 

"O, dear, I have slurred over that translation, and I haven't taken 
the pains to make this page neat, and I have let my mind dwell on a 
hundred things besides this examination." 

Feeling thoroughly dissatisfied with her performance, she pushed 
her papers aside, and raised her eyes to the face of Doctor Bowles' 
young assistant. She had a delicate chain around her neck, and on it 
hung a little cross of gold. The mind of the girl down in the middle 
of the room absorbed the suggestion. 

"Oh !" she said with a quick glow, "I will put a little cross at the 
head of my paper; and I will try to make my examination match it; 
and there shall be careful work." 

With a pencil she traced the outlines, and a new light broke over 
the examination. The spring world outside did not call so distract- 
ingly; and the work of correcting the translation did not seem so dis* 
tasteful, for there was fresh heart to put into it. The examination 
was completed ; the little cross was erased ; the paper was handed in ; 
and it passed the girl on to more difficult Latin and new lessons. The 
Doctor, indeed, found some blots which could not be entirely scratched 
out, and some mistakes; and he marked the paper at 81; but the re- 
cording angels found it almost clean, and marked it on the road to 
perfect. 



A Trip Up the Volcano Agua. 



MARY HANCOCK OWEN. 



The volcano Agua is situated in Guatemala, near the Pacific coast. 

One September about twenty-five of us decided to take a trip up to 
the crater of this volcano. Our party consisted of a Swiss, who spoke 
no English, and very little Spanish, which was our language in coup 
mon, five Frenchmen and several Englishmen and Americans. 

The first day of our trip we spent at the small Indian village of 
Sepaucueti, where white people are seldom seen. So we soon had a 
crowd of wondering Indians around us admiring our clothes and "pale 
faces." 



62 The St. Mary's Muse. 



That night we were treated with all honor : we were serenaded by an 
Indian band, and the guest room of the Chief's "palace" was put at 
our disposal, — I say guest room because we all spent the night in one 
room, a dirt floor for a bed and our shoes as pillows. 

By four the next morning we were all up and had completed our 
very sufficient toilet, so by five we had started our climb of 15,000 feet. 

We certainly were a queer looking party with our picturesque Indian 
water carriers and mule men : and we on our mules with striped Indian 
blankets pinned around our shoulders. 

It was ten before we reached the summit, for though the actual 
distance is not so great, the road is rough and there are many places 
where a mule and rider can not pass. 

The view from the summit was magnificent. You could see for 
miles and miles little towns which seemed as mere specks in the dis- 
tance. All around below us circled the clouds, which looked like the 
foam of the ocean. The air at such a great height was so very rare 
that we could hardly breath. We would have to sit down every few 
steps to get up strength to go further. It was hard even for the mules 
to breathe. 

About one o'clock we had our lunch in the crater on an enormous 
rock. It is needless to say we enjoyed every mouthful after our hard 
morning's climb. After lunch we took a nap, each one sleeping be- 
tween two rocks, for fear of rolling down the mountain. 

We started our descent about half-past two. One of the party, a 
botanist who was trying to get a rare flower, which only grows there 
lost his balance and fell many feet before he was rescued, though not 
before he had been slightly hurt. With the exception of this accident 
we reached Sepaucueti safely, where the whole Indian tribe was out 
to meet us, rejoicing at our return. 

We were indeed ready for our dirt beds that night, after our tire- 
some and perilous but thoroughly enjoyable and memorable trip. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 63 



SCriOOL NEWS. 



Alice Leigh Hines, Rebe Hill Shields, Editors. 



On Saturday evening, September 19, the Muse Club held a sale of 
pictures from last year's Annual, kodak pictures, St. Mary's post- 
cards, monthly Muses, and several copies of the 1908 Annual. The 
parlor looked very attractive with statistic pictures and Muses pinned 
on the walls, and pretty post-cards and sheets from the Annual lying 
on the tables. The amount taken in will be used for the Annua] 
Muse of 1909. The Senior class have begun early this year working 
for the benefit of their Annual, and we wish them the greatest success 
in their undertaking. 

Society Meetings. 

The first meeting of the Sigma Lambda and Epsilon Alpha Pi Liter- 
ary Societies were held Wednesday night, September 23. 

The Epsilon Alpha Pi elected their new officers : President, Sallie 
Haywood Battle ; Vice-President, Ida Jean Rogerson ; Corresponding 
Secretary, Annie Wood; Secretary, Eva Rogerson; Treasurer, Julia 
Mclntyre; Critic, Minnie Hazard; Historian, Paula Hazard; Tellers. 
Nell Lewis and Laura Meares. Both Societies nominated the new 
members and discussed the work for the coming year. 

Norman H a cKett. 

Quite a number of the girls went to see Norman Hackett in '"The 
Classmates" on Monday night, September 23. Mr. Hackett lectured 
up here in the schoolroom informally about Shakespeare. One point 
that he emphasized was that people should study Shakespeare himself 
in his works and not read contemporary writers to learn of him. 

Athletics. 

Athletics have started out this year with more vim and enthusiasm 
than usual. Already we have had basketball meetings and started off 
with basketball teams. On last Friday afternoon quite a crowd could 
be seen .over near the basketball courts watching the game. 

Two new tennis courts have been made back of the auditorium. 
Then, too, some of the girls said something about baseball, and Mr 
Lay seemed to like the idea very much and said that he would see what 
could be done about it. 



64 The St. Mary's Muse. 



School Notes. 



— Gladys Clark and Virginia Prettyman are fortunate in having 
their mothers still with them. Mrs. Clark and Mrs. Prettyman are 
boarding in the city, but are frequent visitors at St. Mary's. 

— Janie Jones was made very happy by an unexpected visit from her 
father last week. Judge Jones, having several cases on hand, spent 
some time in Raleigh. 

— Senator Overman was at St. Mary's one night last week to see his 
daughter, Katherine. 

— The Reverend Mr. Luney, father of one of our piano teachers. 
Miss Luney, has been in Raleigh for some time. He has assisted Mr. 
Lay in the Sunday afternoon services and will, we hope, be with us 
often. 

— Mr. Perry, Isabel Perry's brother, was at St. Mary's to see his 
sister last week. 

— Lucy Dortch has had her sister, Ellen Dortch, with her for several 
days. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN. 



Up the hall comes the Editor, 

Her face is wan and pale — 
She's entirely too sweet to get mad at her, 

So 'round the corner I sail. 

I was too slow, for she spied me, 
Her face was hopeful and bright. 

"Oh, a poem for the Muse!" she did chide me. 
Xow what on earth shall I write? 

Soon as I promised I ran away, 
I thought I'd be free for a while; 

But I met the Manager, about to say, 
"Subscribe for the Muse," with a smile. 

"It 's only a dollar, it'll help you a lot." 
Her offer seemed simple and fine. 

But "it 's only a dollar" I haven't got — 
When she argued, I couldn't decline. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 65 



'T would take a hard-hearted creature 

To snub a girl of the Muse; 
So when they come to entreat you, 

Just smile and never refuse. M. Kipps. 



Overheard on Senior Y\a\\. 

"For the love of Casey! I never saw such a room — where on earth 
are all these things going, Cue ?" 

"Well, for goodness sake, don't stand there staring with your mouth 
open — crawl under the bureau and get the hammer — Dummy ! take 
your foot out of that wash bowl ! Now look what you've done." 

"Well, what under the sun is the wash bowl doing in the middle of 
the floor any way ?" 

"Oh! for pity's sake, stop fussing, go borrow a tack or something; 
there isn't an earthly thing we need in this room, unless it's under the 
bureau, and nobody will fish it out." 

"Oh ! / could get under the bureau all right, but how on earth did 
the hammock ever hold you this summer — poor thing, I feel for it !" 

"Please let's stop fussing. We'll never get a thing done." 

"Well, who started it, I'd like to know ?" 

"There you go again ! Look out ! don't sit on that chair, my hat's 
underneath all those clothes. And how on earth did my bottle of 
Hudnut's get in the trash basket ? Where is my trunk going, please 
tell me — under the table or on top of the wardrobe?" 

"Oh ! I don't know — eat it ! You worry me green." 

"You horrid creature ! I hate you !" 

"Praise Casey! We can't do another thing without a stepladder; 
please go see if you can't find one." 

"My land, didn't I go ask for a whiskbroom — and didn't I get looked 
at like I was a — a — a — an ossified potato? You don't catch me over 
there again. Well, you are the liimt; what on earth are you doing 
pulling all those things out of your trunk when this room is already 
full up to the brim ?" 

"Oh, I forgot to wrap Jack up! I know he's cracked I I know 
he's cracked ! — He IS cracked ! ! !" 



66 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"You talk like a clown ! Who is Jack, any way % For the land's 
sake, get up off the floor and hush. I'm sure / can't help it if he is 
cracked. Where must I put this pennant ?" 

"Where' d you get that pennant, anyway? I never saw it before!" 

"Suitor, child ; suitor !" 

"There goes- Peggy! Run call her quick! I know she's going 
down town, and she just must get me some things. Peggy, darlin' 
don't try to back out of the room. I only want you to get just two 
or three little things for me. It wouldn't take you a second. I'll 
write 'em down for you : 

One curtain pole. 

One woolly rat. 

One waste paper basket. 

Hammer and tacks. 

Candy (10c store). 

Peanut butter and crackers. 

Alarm clock. 

That's all. They won't be much trouble, will they \ Only seven 
things ?" 

"Sakes alive, what do you take me for — a delivery wagon ? I've a 
thousand things to get for myself, thank you. No, sir ! I'm gone. 
Good-bye!" 

"I do think she might have done that little favor for me. I always 
knew she was the most unaccommodating person that ever was. 'And 
just to think — she has never even paid me that stamp she owes me! 
Edith, what on earth are you doing under the bed ? I told you the 
scissors were over here behind the box-couch ! That reminds me — 
we've got to clean that old thing out." 

"Say, child, don't let's clean up any more; we'll be too tired to lis- 
ten to the serenade to-night — fish out a hat pin and let's cut the cake, 
I do hope those boys will come over like they promised. It doesn't 
look like this room will ever get straight — but here's hoping." 

M. C. Shufokd, 
Ida J. Rogerson. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = a = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1908-'09. 

Mary Campbell Shuford, Editor in Chief. 

Ida Jean Rogerson, Business Manager. 
Rebe Hill Shields, "I xr=™ ww „,„ Minnie Hazard, ) th.-^^ ™: t „„ 

Alice Leigh Hines, j News Edltors - Lena Everett, j Ll terary Editors. 

Paula Hazard, Associate Editor. Annie C. Wood, Associate Editor. 

Laura Meares, Exchange Editor. 
Frances Bottom, Assistant Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL. 



With this issue the St. Mary's Monthly Muse has started ou the 
fifth year of its existence. The Muse has never aspired to the position 
of a literary publication, but so far it has realized its aim of being a 
good school paper. Whether it can be kept up to this standard de- 
pends a great deal upon the girls of St. Mary's. If they will support 
the magazine by their subscriptions and also help it by submitting 
stories and poems for its consideration, the present Board of Editor? 
hope to make the Muse of this year both a good and interesting school 
publication. 



Among the "old familiar faces" that we so gladly greet again there 
are many new ones to learn this year, and it is to these "new girls" 
that the Muse especially wishes to extend a warm welcome. We hope 
that they will be lenient with our faults and appreciative of our good 
points, and that they will take as much interest in the Muse as the 
Muse takes in them. 



Also to the Alumnae we wish to say that we look to them for help 
as well as to the present students, and hope they will continue to send 



68 The St. Mary's Muse. 



us any items of news about old St. Mary's girls that we would like 
to know. 



We are glad to note the great improvement that the electric lights 
have added to the school. This way of illuminating the building not 
only gives better and brighter lights, but also is a much easier and 
more efficient method than the old gas jets. 



Athletics. 



It is with sincere regret that we have to admit the dearth of athletics 
last year, and we sincerely hope that the girls of 1908-09 will greatly 
improve upon the poor example set them by the girls of last year. We 
appreciate the good start that has already been made, and we feel that 
the new arrangement of allowing only Juniors and Seniors to gc 
down town during the week will aid us greatly in our work. But of 
course nothing can be done unless every girl, individually, takes a 
personal interest in the various sports. We must arouse our enthu- 
siasm and school spirit. We wish to thank Miss Jones for her kind 
efforts in the advancement of basketball; but since she can do nothing 
alone, we ask each girl, personally, to take an intense interest in 
athletics. 



The Girls. 



Many new faces appear in our midst just as a number of old ones 
are missing; and, since we no longer have the daily roll call, it is not 
easy to acquaint one's self with the names of all the girls. At first 
all strange faces look much alike and, too, little significance is attached 
to the numerous names we hear ; but, after a time, all this will change 
and every name will represent to each of us a distinct personality^ 
We are saddened by the many familiar faces that are wanting; but 
having a number of new girls with us, we hope that no one will fail to 
enlarge the circle of her friends. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 69 



And so, thinking that it will be helpful to readers of the Muse here 
and elsewhere, we give the following list of the St. Mary's girls of 
the year : 

Bessie Wilson Arthur Union, S. C. 

Elizabeth Barnwell Stateburg, S. C. 

Elizabeth Dancy Battle Tarboro, N. C. 

Sallie Haywood Battle Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Anna Coates Benedict Athens, Ga. 

Harriet White Benedict Athens, Ga. 

Julia Borden ' Goldsboro, N. C. 

Mildred Borden Goldsboro, N. C. 

Frances Ranney Bottum El Paso, Texas. 

Mary Parker Bourne Tarboro, N. C. 

Hilda Broadwood Point Clear, Ala. 

Marjorie Brown Atlanta, Ga. 

Cora Vines Bryan Aurora, X. C. 

Mary Delamar Burbank Wilmington, N. C. 

Hallie Jordan Garrison Camden, S. C. 

Constance Cavell Lake City, Fla. 

Gladys Adine Clark Tampa, Fla. 

Elva Crowell Xewton, X. C. 

Augusta Pendleton Divine Rocky Mount, 1ST. C. 

Ella Dorroh Greenville, S. C. 

Lucy Bayard Dortch Goldsboro, X. C. 

Janie Porcher DuBose Columbia, S. C. 

Estelle Egerton Hendersonville, X. C. 

Dorothy Eldredge Camden, S. C. 

Lovina Theodora Eldredge Camden, S. C. 

Rebecca Ellett Spray, N. 0. 

Bessie Smedes Erwin West Durham, X. C. 

Margaret Locke Erwin West Durham, X. C. 

Marjorie Evans Marion, S. C. 

Lena Payne Everett Rockingham, X. C. 

Susie M. Everett Rockingham, X. C. 

Sarah Glen Fairley Rockingham, X. C. 

Katharine Clifton Fairley Rockingham, N. C. 

Martha Gregory Ferebee Oxford, N. C. 

Mary Seton Gales Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Mariel Gary Henderson, X. C. 

Xina Farrow Gibbs Oriental, X. C. 

Mary Rawls Gilliam Tarboro, X. C. 

Mary Pender Gladstone Hamilton, X. C. 

Laura Washington Griffith Charlotte, X.C. 

Georgia Stanton Hales Wilson, X. C. 



70 The St. Maky's Muse. 



Lorna Stanton Hales Wilson, X. C. 

Marie Hardin Gastonia, X. C. 

Wilhelmina Harlow Wilmington, N. C. 

Ella Mildred Harman Atlanta, Ga. 

Lucy G. Harrison Enfield, X. C. 

Agnes Tinsley Harrison Atlanta. Ga.. 

Fannie Lamb Haughton Washington, N. C. 

Margaret C. Haughton Charlotte, N. C. 

Catharine London Hawkins Jacksonville, Fla. 

Minnie Tamplet Hazard Georgetown, S. C. 

Paula Elizabeth Hazard Georgetown, S. C. 

Elizabeth Byrd Henderson Asheville, N. C. 

Xellie Hendricks Marshall, N. C. 

Gladys Hill Baltimore, Md. 

Alice Leigh Hines Kinston, X. C. 

Clara Louise Hines Kinston, X. C. 

May Louise Hoke Jensen, Fla. 

Sarah Vernon Holloway Enfield, X. C. 

Elizabeth Nash Holt Fayetteville, X. C. 

Lucille Eccles Johns West Raleigh, X. C. 

Caroline Clarke Jones Charlotte, X. C. 

Janie Jones Asheville, N. C. 

Lila Cutlar Justice Greensboro, X. C. 

Mary Kipps Blacksburg, Va. 

Minnie Leary Elizabeth City, X. C. 

Xell Battle Lewis Pvaleigh, X. C. 

Cornelia Francis Loomis Muskegon, Mich. 

Mary Ruth Madre Windsor, X. C. 

Emily Marriott Battleboro, X. C. 

Elizabeth Marriott Battleboro, X. C. 

Laura Meares Asheville, X. C. 

Exum Meares Asheville, X. C. 

Meta Mewborn Kinston, X. C. 

Maude Monroe Rockingham, X. C. 

Louise Morphew Marion, X. C. 

Eliza Ward Morton Wilmington, X. C. 

Mary Morgan Myers Charlotte, X. C. 

Julia Louise Mclntyre Mullins, S. C. 

Ruth MacXaughton Morganton, X. C. 

Margaret Xelson Jacksonville, Fla. 

Irene Xash Xickerson Athens, Ga. 

Alice Xoble Wilmington, X. C. 

Passie May Ottley Atlanta, Ga. 

Katharine Baird Overman Salisbury, X. C. 

Mary Hancock Owen Guatemala, C. A. 

Kathryn DeRosset Parker Plainfield, X. J. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 71 



Janie Louise Patrick Chocowinity, N. C. 

Nellie Holmes Pearson Salisbury, N. C. 

Margaret Cordon Pennington Tarboro, N. C. 

Isabel Perry Henderson, N. C. 

Marie Alice Perry Atlanta, Ga. 

Lilias Lee Pratt Bartow, Fla. 

Virginia Selden Prettyman Marion, S. C. 

Helen Blair Rawlings Wilson, N. C. 

Esther Goudine Rembert Eernbert, S. C. 

Virginia C. Reynolds Sumter, S. C. 

Helen Virgilia Robinson Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Joanna Elizabeth Rogers Jacksonville, Fla. 

Eva Rogerson Edenton, N. C. 

Ida Jean Rogerson Edenton, N. C. 

Nora Belle Rosser Atlanta, Ga. 

Ila Adele Rountree Wilmington, N. C. 

Henrietta S. Russell New Iberia, La. 

Frankie Lenore Self Hickory, N. C. 

Rebecca Hill Shields Scotland Neck, X. C. 

Mary Campbell Shuford Hickory, N. C. 

Janie Ruffin Sims Maxwelton, Va. 

Penelope Slade Columbus, Ga. 

Helen G. Slocomb Fayetteville, N. C. 

Esther White Springs Charlotte, N. C. 

Martha Byrd Spruill Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Helen W T ilmer Stone New Orleans, La. 

Amelia Sturgeon Cary, N. C. 

Lena Taylor Townesville, N. C. 

Lily Edmonston Taylor Wilmington, N. C. 

Marie Jacquelin Thomas Charlotte, N. C. 

Virginia Alice Vanderford Salisbury, N. C. 

Mary Vann Wilmington, N. C. 

Jessice Vann Wilmington, N. C. 

Louise M. Vincent Athens, Ga. 

Emma Rochelle Williams Jacksonville, Fla. 

Annie Caroline Wood Edenton, N. C. 

Rebecca Benehan Wood Edenton, N. C. 

Jessie Woodall Raleigh, N. C. 

Lucia Gibbon Yates Camden, S. C. 

Lillian C. Yates Camden, S. C. 



72 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



And the following local pupils, 

Mattie Bailey 

Cora Bryan 

Mary Mitchell Chamberlain 

Lizzie Cherry 

Julia Fisher Coke 

Irma Deaton 

Elizabeth Folk 

Alice Giersch 

Mary Habel 

Mary Hadley 

Mildred Hall 

Corneille Harris 

Nannie Bhoda Hay 

Elizabeth Hughes 

Katharine Hughes 

Ina Jones 

Elizabeth Lay 

Ellen Lay 

Lucy Lay 



excluding "specials" : 

Nancy Lay 
Nannie Lee 
Edith Mann 
Edna Mann 
Eleanor Mann 
Lucy Mann 
Margaret Mann 
Anne McKimmon 
Ella Mial 
Lula Parker 
Virginia Pickel 
Henrietta Schwartz 
Florence Stone 
Frances Strong 
Elizabeth Thompson 
Josephine Tonnoffski 
Amelia Whitaker 
Josephine Williford 



ALUMNAE MATTERS, 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ckuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

{Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Mrs. 1. M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 
Mrs. P. P. Tucker, Raleigh, 
Mrs.Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL. 



The opening of a new session of St. Mary's urges us on to renewed 
effort to expand the usefulness of the Muse and to promote the in- 
terests of the Alumnae. While the results of last year were far short 
of what those interested would have had them, they marked a distinct 
advance on the work of the preceding year and give encouragement for 
the present and future. 

The Alumnae Chapters. 

The meetings of Founders' Day, 1907, were far more successful than 
there was reason to hope they would be considering the lack of time for 
arranging for them, and while the lack of reports from the Alumnse 
Chapters called into new or renewed existence last All Saints' would 
indicate that few of them have been able to keep up to even the modest 
program they outlined for themselves they have doubtless not forgotten. 
The long delay in the publication of the Alumnae Muse was discourag- 
ing to interest ; the lack of communication from the School is more or 
less dampening to enthusiasm. Of course, the live Alumna? Chapter 
must depend largely on itself for its program and work and no amount 
of enthusiasm in the School will go very far toward providing for a 
dearth of it in the Alumnse town, but we realize that the School must 
be more constantly and persistently before our eyes and in our thoughts 
than it can be elsewhere and that we owe it to those elsewhere to try 
to lend them of the fruits of our greater opportunity. We have not 
done what we could in reminding those who forgot or who were turned 



74 The St. Mary's Muse. 



aside by the more engrossing demands of the moment, but the hearts 
of the Alumnae at St. Mary's have been with their sisters constantly, 
and the Muse will try to do its part better during the season ahead of 
us. Let us be up and thinking of this Founders' Day and the meetings, 
and of the work we can do between those meetings and Alumnae Day 
next May. This is the work season and every Chapter can accomplish 
something worth while for itself and for St. Mary's during the six 
months that are ahead. 

The Muse. 
One of the encouraging signs in the publication of the Muse — and 
the encouragements are not over numerous — is the increased interest 
manifested year by year by the Alumnae who have acquainted them- 
selves with it. Few in number, there is scarcely one who showed her 
interest in St. Mary's by supporting the Muse when it was begun again 
who has not continued her interest and stated that the coming of the 
little publication has been a real pleasure to her. The letters and other 
evidences of interest increase season by season and afford marked en- 
couragement. But it is never unalloyed. As we have so often said, 
how much better and more interesting to the Alumnae the paper could 
and would be if there were only more who were interested in having 
it interesting. There should be a thousand Alumnse receiving the 
Muse month by month, and what a small part of that thousand have 
ever shown any wish to receive it ! Some time this fall it is planned 
to once again make an active campaign to interest the Alumnae in 
greater numbers in the paper. May we hope for the active aid of every 
friend in bringing about a larger circulation. It is absolutely necessary 
to have it if the Muse is to aid in the development of the School. 



Fall Weddings. 



From the announcements — and rumors — with which we are fre- 
quently greeted it seems that this is to be an autumn even unusually 
full of the weddings of St. Mary's girls. And some of these brides- 
to-be were with us only yesterday and so the events are closely con- 
nected even with the present student-body. We like to publish an ade- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 75 

quate announcement of each Alumnae marriage ; where the notices are 
not at hand we have to confine ourselves to the cards — but there is no 
lack of interest on the part of the Muse when the account has to be 
omitted. 

In the summer occurred the marriages of Bessie Poe Law, '05, for- 
merly of Raleigh, to Mr. Paul Davis, of Wilson's Mills ; and of Laura 
Baker (1906), of Brunswick, Ga., to Mr. Don Richardson, of Char- 
lotte. 

Rev. Dr. Niles, whose marriage was celebrated September 22, was 
for several years Rector of Trinity Church, Columbia. While there 
he visited St. Mary's at the Commencement of 1905 and delivered the 
Annual Sermon, and later he gave the "Niles Medal for General Ex- 
cellence" which has been awarded at the last three Commencements. 
Dr. Xiles is now located in Philadelphia, but his interest in St. Mary's 
continues, and we hope we may again have the pleasure of a visit from 
him that the St. Mary's girls of the present may make his acquaint- 
ance. The Muse extends congratulations to Dr. and Mrs. jSTiles. 

Margaret DuBose, '05, of Morganton, who became Mrs. Avery Octo- 
ber 7; Annie Wells (1905-07), of Columbia, now Mrs. Ehrlich, and 
Amy Fitz-Simons (1903-04), of Adams' Run, S. C, now Mrs. Walker, 
are all too well known to St. Mary's girls of late years to need intro- 
duction. Margaret DuBose had for five years an important part in 
everything that concerned student life, and her writings for the Muse 
were one of its features during her school days. For herself and for 
her connection with the former Rector — she is Mr. DuBose's elder 
daughter — her marriage has special interest to St. Mary's. 

The Muse extends best wishes to each of the brides and their fortu- 
nate bridegrooms. 

St. Mary's girls formed a prominent part in both the Avery-DuBose 
and Ehrlich-Wells bridal parties. 



76 The St. Mary's Muse. 



NILES-DOYLE. 

Mrs. George Washington Doyle 

announces the marriage of her daughter 

Mary Frances 

to 

the Reverend Charles Martin ISTiles, D.D. 

on Tuesday the twenty-second of September 

nineteen hundred and eight 

Church of the Saviour 

Philadelphia 



AVERY-DUBOSE. 

Reverend and Mrs. MclSTeely DuBose 

invite you to be present 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Margaret Rosalie 

to 

Mr. Isaac Thomas Avery 

on Wednesday afternoon the seventh of October 

nineteen hundred and eight 

at half after four o'clock 

Grace Church 

Morganton, jSForth Carolina 

From the Charlotte Observer: 

Morganton, October 7. — This evening at Grace Episcopal church was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Isaac Thomas Avery and Miss Margaret Rosalie Dubose at 
8:30 o'clock. The church was decorated in stately palms and the altar was adorned 
with pink dahlias and roses, the whole being brilliantly illuminated. More than 
five hundred witnessed the ceremony. Prior to the ceremony the organist, Mr. Hardy 
Turner, rendered selections from Nein. The wedding party was announced by 
the bridal chorus from Lohengrin. The flower girls, Misses Rainsford Dubose and 
Lillian Avery, preceded the ushers, Messrs. McNeely Dubose and Walton Avery, 
a son of the groom, who were followed by the bridesmaids, Misses Virginia Griffith 
Miller and Susie Carter, of Asheville. Then came the groomsmen, Messrs. Melton 
Ervin and James Wilson, followed by bridesmaids, Misses Bessie Arthur, of Union, 
S. C, and Eleanor Wilson. Afterward came groomsmen, Messrs. Walton Phifer 
and W. H. Yount, of Hickory. The maid of honor, Miss Daisy King, of Sewanee,. 



The St. Mary's Muse, 77 

Tenn., preceded the bride, avIio was accompanied by her mother, to the chancel 
steps, where they were met by Rev. McNeely Dubose, father of the bride, and the 
groom and his best man, Dr. Edward Phifer, where the betrothal service was said, 
the bride being given away by her mother. The bridal party took their places in 
the chancel and the full Episcopal ceremony was impressively said. During the 
service Mr. Turner played the "Flower Song." Other organ renditions were Men- 
delssohn's "Wedding March," to which the party left the church, the groomsmen 
accompanying the bridesmaids, the ushers together and Mrs. Dubose with the 
flower girls. The bride was attired in a creation of liberty satin, made princess en 
train trimmed with filet lace embroidered in pearls, which was an heirloom, being 
used on her grandmother's and mother's wedding gown. Her long tulle veil was 
caught with a coronet of orange blossoms. She carried a presentation bouquet of 
pink roses and asparagus. The maids were gowned in white net over white taffeta 
and carried shower bouquets of roses and asparagus fern. Pearl ornaments were 
worn at the corsage. Her mother wore a gown of gray silk abundantly trimmed 
with cream applique. The maid of honor wore a gown of white net made princess, 
elaborately trimmed in Valenciennes lace and pin tucks. Immediately after the 
service a reception was held at the rectory. 

Mr. and Mrs. Avery left at midnight and were escorted by a host of friends 
to the station. They will be at home in Morganton after November 1st. 



EHRLICH-WELLS. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert E. Wells 

request the honor of yonr presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Annie Cordelle 

to 

Mr. John Gladden Ehrlich 

on the evening of Thursday the fifteenth of October 

at half after eight o'clock 

the Church of the Good Shepherd 

Columbia, South Carolina 

From the Columbia State: 

The bridesmaids, an unusually lovely group of young girls, including the 

closest of the bride's associates of her childhood and school days, were Misses 
Blandina Springs of Charlotte, Miss Lyman Grimsley of Greensboro, Miss Emily 
Clarkson, Miss Mildred Wells of Cheraw, Miss Ethel Willis and Miss Harriet Keitt 
McQueen. They all wore lovely lingerie gowns in directoire style with directoire 
sashes of Nile green and carried great white chrysanthemums tied with green. They' 
walked two and two, each couple attended by two groomsmen, the entire party of 12 
grouping themselves in the chancel against the background of waving ferns and 



78 * The St. Mary's Muse. 



burning candles. Immediately preceding the bride was her pretty young sister, 
Miss Mary Wells, at home from Hollins for the occasion. Her costume was all 
white, the lingerie gown of the same style as those of the bridesmaids, her dainty 
slippers and gloves all white and her flowers were tied with snowy gauze ribbons. 

The bride, noted always for her delicate flower-like beauty, was exquisite 

in her bridal gown, a creation of white satin fashioned in one of the most graceful 
adaptations of the new directoire style. The soft shimmering fabric fell in heavy 
draperies in the front and extended in a long train in the back and the bodice 
portion was a wonderful combination of the satin with quantities of Venetian point 
lace. Graceful little pendant ornaments of pearl and silver were caught here and 
there about the bodice and the dainty little elbow sleeves and the girdle drawn 
high in the back gleamed with a touch of silver web. Crowning her wealth of rich 
auburn hair was a coronet of fresh orange blossoms, which held in place the filmy 
wedding veil and completing the bridal costume was an exquisite bouquet of bride 
roses with a shower of lilies of the valley falling to the hem of the gown. The 
bride entered with her father, Mr. Herbert Wells, and was met at the chancel 
steps by the groom, who entered from the vestry room attended by his brother, Mr. 
Frank Ehrlich. There the betrothal vows were made, the Rev. Alex. Mitchell, of 
Greenville, rector of the Church of the Good Shepherd during the bride's child- 
hood and a close friend of the family, investing this part of the ceremony with 
impressive solemnity. For the marriage vows the young couple, attended by the 
maid of honor and the best man, proceeded to the altar, where the rector, the 
Eev. W. Postell Witsell, officiated. 

The bride and groom count among their presents the furnishing from garret 

to cellar in handsome mahogany of the attractive home Mr. Ehrlich has bought 
in the rear of the Wells residence. Hangings and rugs there are, too, in keeping 
with the style of each room. This delightful home awaits their return from their 
bridal trip and they will go immediately to housekeeping in about two weeks. 



WALKER-FITZ SIMONS. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Gaillard Fitz Simons 

request the honor of 

your presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Amy Perry 

to 

Mr. James Pickens Walker 

on the evening of the twentieth of October 

nineteen hundred and eight 

at nine o'clock 

At home 

Adams Run, South Carolina 



The St. Mary's Muse. 79 

Notes. 

Miss Mary E. Tarrh, of Florence, than whom St. Mary's has no more 
interested daughter nor the Muse a warmer friend, in renewing her 
subscription writes, on October 12 : "Elizabeth Waddill is in Newark 
at present. I had a letter from her a few days since. She has begun 
a course of drawing lessons. Beatrice Cohen is supply teacher for this 
session at the Graded School here. Lillian Farmer has returned to 
McClellansville. 

I can not close without telling you how intensely I enjoyed the 
Alumna? number for May. I was so glad to see the account of the 
portraits of Bishops Ravenscroft and Ives. I shall certainly get Mr. 
Haywood's book as soon as it is out. I have photographs of both paint- 
ings and remember the one of Bishop Ives as being the handsomest 
of the kind I have ever seen." 



Florence Beckwith, with health restored, is this winter attending the 
Hartridge School, at Plainfleld, ]ST. J. She writes (October 12) : 
"Evidently the only way I can keep up with St. Mary's is to get the 
Muse, as my friends there seem to have forgotten that I am still in- 
terested in the happenings there. I am delighted with the school here, 
climate and so forth, but I often wish I were back in Raleigh again. 
Please remember me to everybody." 



Who could withstand the appeal in this : 

Dear Editors: We have lost our class letter and want you to help us to find 
it. Please put in the Muse the following notice: 

"Lost — The chain-letter of the Class of 1904. Will any one who has had it 
during the past six months please communicate with Minnie Burgwyn, Jackson, 
N. G." 

Sincerely, Meetoie Burgwyn, '04. 

August 28th. Kittie Coleman, '04. 



St. Mary's has many daughters of whose missionary work of various 
kinds she is proud, and a glimpse at the present day missionary work 
of one of her daughters is gotten in charming fashion from the follow- 



80 The St. Mary's Muse. 



ing "storv" published in the ISFew York Times of June 20. Miss Weir 
has now been teaching in the ^ew York schools for several years, and 
her interest in her work in a Room 501" is readily perceived. 

REAL ICE CREAM FOR SCHOOL NO. I. 

Loretto, who has been arrested five times, got ice, and Lee brought 
bananas, Teacher did the rest, except for turning the freezer, at 
which all took turns — Prizes were awarded. 

There was great excitement in Room 501 of Public School No. 1 yesterday after- 
noon. Of course, there was an exhibition with prizes, but that didn't matter so 
much. After many days days of speculation it became known that there would be 
ice cream, not of the kind one "gets off the hoky-poky by pennies." This was to be 
free ice cream, with two helpings around, and it had bananas in it, too. 

The occasion for this unheard-of extravagance was the Plant Show of the Class 
of Defectives in the Henry Street building, and the feast was to be laid for scholars 
and guests. For the last few years the Department of Agriculture has been 
interested in having city school children learn to grow and tend plants, and each 
spring it has sent the seeds necessary for this experiment. 

Although Room 501 is made up of defectives and incorrigibles, no one would 
have guessed it on Exhibition Day. The miniature farms which stand in front of 
each window bore heavy crops of corn and beans, with an occasional potato stalk, 
though these do not seem to flourish in a school atmosphere. The farms are in 
charge of a committee of two, Louis Francusi and Joe Markcano, and woe to him 
who touches the official lettuce and parsley. On the side benches was piled the 
exhibition of woodwork, while on the desks were the competing plants, in old tin 
dishes or wooden boxes. 

If the exhibition was the point of interest to the visiting teachers and Inspectors, 
the hearts of the children were set on the ice cream. "Teacher," Miss Harriet 
Page Weir, had purchased the cream at the "Christian milk and butter store," but 
the matter of getting the ice was left to Loretto and Louis Francusi. Loretto had 
been arrested five times before he was put in the class for incorrigibles, and he 
had no intention of spending ten perfectly good cents for ice. Loretto gathered 
to himself a pair of tongs and went down in the dark of Thursday night to the 
Pike Street pier, where the ice comes in, and "hooked a chunk." 

Unfortunately for his enterprise, the big block melted away, and early in the 
morning Loretto and Francusi again visited Pike Street. This time, though, they 
had to pay for the ice, Loretto reported, bewailing the useless expenditure of a 
whole dime. The ice was duly chopped and the cream made ready for the freezers, 
when Lee entered triumphantly with a large bundle of bananas. Things haven't 
been going any too well in Lee's home this winter. About all the food he had 
came from "teacher," and as the weeks passed by the boys, seeing the yawning 
gulf between Lee's unwontedly thin ankles and worn shoes, would comment: "Gee, 
his boots has got cuffs on." But a few days ago Lee's father found a job as 
stevedore, unloading fruit from South America, and — well, Room 501 had banana 
ice cream. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 81 

Abie didn't quite approve of this needless luxury. ''Wasn't plain stuff good 
enough for anybody?" 

"And she took dose bananas, and dey was so long," drawing a grimy forefinger 
along his arm to the elbow, "and teacher, she cuts 'em all up and puts 'em in." 

When it came to the freezing every fellow took a turn at the crank. "We two 
done the packing," declared Lee, proudly, pointing to Loretto, "but teacher gives 
'em a chanst at grinding. Dat's a cinch. Youse don't have to know nothin' to 
turn the crank, but she lets us crack de ice." 

As a result of their united energy the ice cream was duly packed and stowed 
away by 9:30 o'clock, although the prizes weren't to be given out until noon. Then 
the judges didn't come until after 1 o'clock, and the boys had to be dismissed for 
noon reecss without their feast. They were back, most of them, inside of ten 
minutes, waiting anxiously for the deferred treat. 

When the judges came the plant prize went to Joe Markcano, and awards for 
woodwork to Galloto, who was blind until two months ago, and Pareso, who hasn't 
anything the matter with his head, but who goes on crutches, got second prize for 
his miniature set of mission furniture. Loretto, when told to take his choice, 
grabbed tightly a copy of "Black Beauty." 

If the awards were received with applause, the ice cream was accepted in blissful 
silence. Everybody had "seconds," and as for Nat, he tended straight to business 
and didn't mind not getting a prize. 

"Nope," said he, "I don't care. Dis is me toid help." 



PRESSES OF EDWARDS & P.R0UGHT0N PRINTING CO. 



READ !— MARK '.—ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



1 It's worth the difference" 



WHARTON & TYREE 



Workers in Artistic Photography ' 



ST, MARY'S CALENDARS FOR 1909. 
As pretty as Heretofore ; we think prettier. 



Orders received before December 1st filled 
at Fifty Cents each;, postpaid. 



Ready December 10th. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL CO 

Dry Goods 

OE ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADLES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILXE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



Smith = Tomst Co. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



THIS SPACE BELONGS TO 



BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS 



The Ostrich. 

The ostrich is a silly bird, 

With scarcely any mind. 
He often runs so very fast, 

He leaves himself behind. — 

And when he gets there, has to stand 

And hang about till night, 
Without a blessed thing to do 

Until he comes in sight. 



M. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON <fc HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 

BANKING. 
All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 


The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital, $ 100,000.00 
Surplus, - - 100,000.00 
Deposits, - 1,175,000.00 
Assets, - 1,500,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchfoed, Cashier 


THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 


St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 


JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 

Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 





The Bliss of Ignorance. 

With proud, imperious mien, 
She looked a graceful queen. 

All eyes were turned, 

And gallants burned 
To tell her what they'd seen. 

Her flowing silken gown 
Made envious women frown, 

Then they would grin, 

Oh, what a sin! 
Her hair was coming down! — Philadelphia Inquirer. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 


WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.* 


ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 


Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 


GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— GROCERS. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESK), 

Manufacturing: Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 


THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY. 

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW 

Ladies' Furnishings and Novelties. 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 


THE J. D. RIGQAN COMPANY, 

Candy— China. 

Pictures. Stationery. Toys, 


T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 
Fayetteville Street. 





Impatient Susie. 

"Oh, I can't thread this needle, ma," 

Was little Susie's cry; 
"Just as the thread is going through, 

The needle winks its eye." — Woman's Home Companion. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBBINS' LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

'PHONES 81. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 


J. SCHWARTZ, 
RICHMOND MARKET. 


H. STEIN METZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violet*, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds. 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 


Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBT. SIMPSON, ^SSIKBS ete . 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 


H. T. HICKS CO. 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Dkinks. 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 
Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 
Francis P. Venable, Pres., Chapel Hill, N. C. 



School Calendar, !908-'09. 



September-October. 

September 17, Thursday, 11:30 a. m. — Sixty-Seventh Annual Session opened. 

October 6, Tuesday, 8:30.— First Faculty Eecital. 

October 17, Saturday, 8:00. — Annual Reception of the Sigma Lambda Literary So- 
ciety. 

October 24, Saturday, 8:00. — Annual Reception of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary 
Society. 

October 31, Saturday, 8:00. — Annual Hallowe'en Celebration. 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited. 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD. 
107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 




YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pullen, 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cash'r. Capital and Surplus 
875,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Location Central for the Caroline®. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 
66th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 17, 1908. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 21, 1909. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. 1HE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3. I HE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: k £ THE AR1 SCHOOL 



5. 1HE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1908-09 are enrolled 200 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Steinway Grand Pianos. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training, 



For Catalogue and other information address 



Rev. George W. Lay, 

RECTOR. 



SCHOOL SPIRIT Minnie Tamplet Hazard 

XCbe 
SJt. /Ifcan>'s Abuse 

IRovember, 1908 

{Thanksgiving IRumber 




IRaleiQb, W. <L 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

THANKSGIVING NUMBER. 
X III. November, 1908. No. 



God's World is Beautiful. 



IBM A DEATON. 



I sat, one day in summer, 'neath a giant oak; 

A soft breeze stirred the leaves above my head; 
But I saw no beauty in the bright scene 'round 

Till I heard a low, sweet voice which softly said, 
"Lift thine eyes, look 'round thee, and behold God's world." 

I looked, and lo, before me I espied 
A meadow fair where flow'rets grew, and zephyrs played, 

And cloudlets hung; and, as I looked, I cried, 
"God's world is beautiful!" 

I walked, one day in autumn, on a lonely road, 

Deep-thinking of the lovely summer day 
And sorrowing because those bright days were no more, 

When I heard the same sweet voice which seemed to say, 
"Lift thine eyes, look 'round thee, and behold God's world." 

I looked, and in the distance I espied 
A wood whose waving trees were clothed in red and gold, 

And, as I looked upon the scene, I cried, 
"God's world is beautiful!" 

I sat, one day in winter, in my cottage home, 

Beside my window, as the snow-flakes fell 
My heart was filled with longing for the sunny days 

Till I heard the same sweet voice I knew so well, 
"Lift thine eyes, look 'round thee, and behold God's world." 

I looked, and lo, before me, far and wide, 
Stretched endless fields all clothed in spotless white; 

And, as I looked, my soul within me cried, 
"God's world is beautiful!" 

Then came the spring; and now no longer do I need 

That voice to bid me look up and be glad. 
The birds sing blithely now — all nature's bright and gay; 

And, 'mid such gladness, how can I be sad? 



84 The St. Mary's Muse. 



With head uplifted, I behold God's world, 
New beauties in it every day descry. 

My soul is filled with gladness; I am now content: 
And, looking on the glad earth, thus I cry, 
"God's world is beautiful!" 



School Spirit. 



MINNIE TAMPLET HAZARD. 



We sometimes, in an off-hand manner, speak of '"school spirit" ; but 
do we often pause to consider the full meaning of that expression ? A 
school, like a community, is a little world in itself, having like diver- 
sities of interest ; and "school spirit" is that enthusiasm or ardor, that 
abstract quality, which makes a student indifferent to no one of these 
interests, and which causes him to exert an influence for good in the 
school where he works. There are three sides to one's education: the 
physical, which may be considered as embracing all athletics and like- 
wise other forms of recreation and pleasure ; the intellectual, perhaps 
the most frequently considered, pertaining to the actual studies pur- 
sued; and the moral, which is the highest form of education. Let u 01 
now briefly reflect upon "school spirit" in its relation to these three- 
divisions. 

Although the physical feature of school life is most emphasized 
among men, it should nowhere be neglected. We are inclined to look 
with scorn upon the man who evinces an utter lack of interest in the 
games of his college team, and who refuses to grow enthusiastic over 
its victories and sympathetic in times of defeat. It is not always re- 
quired of him that he take a bodily part, but the true college man will 
not fail to back with his personal interest and support, the athletics of 
his school. From this well-known and oft-considered example one 
may go to the smaller and less significant recreations and pleasures of 
the student's life. The school demands, and rightly so, that its pupils 
by their own hearty participation and cooperation further the little 
social and recreative features. He who refuses to acknowledge any 
claims except those of his studies, who is always unwilling to assist his 



The St. Mary's Muse. 85 

fellow-students in their undertakings, and to aid in devising innocent 
and helpful amusements, does not possess the true "school spirit." 
Besides, he is failing to embrace certain of his opportunities, for con- 
tact with one's fellow-students and participation in the common in- 
terests are themselves means of education. 

The life of the world into which we enter when we leave behind our 
school days, is not always lenient nor always kind. It is, in truth, a 
battle, and a participant will find among his strongest weapons this — 
close contact with his fellow-men. He will have interests in common 
with others. His mind is less likely to be narrow; instead it will ex- 
pand and broaden. In distress, sympathy, a human touch, is com- 
forting; while joys shared with others become more truly joys. Thus 
self-interest offers a favorable argument. But also one must realize 
that as he is ministered to by those who are his friends, so can he in 
turn minister to them. And what especially we need to remember 
now is that this social instinct must be fostered in youth. It is too 
valuable to be neglected and so lost. Nor can one who for years has 
lived alone and apart from others hope readily to overcome the shy- 
ness, the sensitiveness, the selfishness, that such a life fosters. He 
will find that he has become self-centered. The social features of a 
school seem small in themselves ; yet we can so use them that they will 
become potent influences. 

Now, as regards the actual studies, it is always well to remember 
the fact that our first object in attending school is that we may be- 
come educated. And, when we here use the term, we refer to it in its 
most common acceptation. No one should neglect the opportunities 
thus afforded him ; but cheerfully and to the best of his ability perform 
the allotted tasks, realizing that a fund of knowledge lies open to him 
from which he can gather much. Were every one to look at the matter 
in this manner, there would no longer be manifested that indifference 
to, and neglect of, the school duties. Those students thoroughly con- 
scientious in their work must of necessity exert an influence that is 
helpful, if not always far reaching. Accordingly, in this intellectual 
phase of education, there is abundant room for the exercise of "school 
spirit." 



86 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Again, the moral atmosphere of a school is largely in the hands of 
the students themselves. Let each one, by the exercise of his personal 
influence, do what he can to raise the standard of morals. Let him 
turn his attention not only to the larger problems, but also to the little 
things. One should perform certain duties not because he has to but 
because it is right that he should so act; and, when there is adherence 
to this principle, there will be needed fewer rules, fewer restrictions. 
Cheerful obedience to rightful authority should be given by all. The 
students of a school are in a better position than even the teachers to 
aid their companions. Oftentimes it is they alone who can ward off 
the little temptations, the small, dishonorable acts. A little kindly 
advice, an expression of sympathy, a word of courage — these are gifts 
which we can give abundantly to one another. There is a call for the 
constant exercise of every one of the finer qualities of the heart — 
cheerfulness, courtesy, unselfishness, honor, and love for one's fellow- 
men. ]STo harmful outside force can enter which can successfully 
combat with the ardor and the determination of the student body. 

And so it is, that the real healthy "school spirit" can, and will, enter 
into every phase of the school life. ~No one can live to himself; hence, 
he is mistaken who believes that isolation, a quiet withdrawal from 
the common interests of his fellows, will influence himself alone. As 
elsewhere in the world, so in school life, one is an agent either for good 
or for evil; and mere indifference or inactivity must inevitably serve 
to retard, in some measure, the current of life around him. 

It has been said that it is more difficult to turn indifference into 
interest than to turn hostility into approval. One may attach little 
importance to mere indifference, thinking it a negative fault. This is 
a mistaken idea. In reality there is no such thing as standing still 
where character and its influence is concerned. Backward or forward, 
there is always motion. And also, is it not true that advantages bring 
responsibility ? ISTo one can overestimate the value of a good school 
education. Shall we be altogether receptive? Shall we give nothing 
in return ? 

The true college student will think of his school, not as merely a 
means by which he is to obtain a certain amount of abstract knowl- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 87 

edge; but as a little community formed for high and noble purposes, 
and dependent, in a certain degree, upon its members for the success 
of those aims. His "school spirit" will cause him not only to receive 
much, but in return to give, by means of his earnestness and ardor, 
support to all the interests of his school life. We have now reached 
a stage when this "school spirit" should no longer be for us a meaning- 
less phrase, but a vital and potent influence for good. 



Caught Masquerading. 



JAXIE PORCHER DU ROSE. 



"O soul, soul!" yawned sleepy Rob. "I wonder if it is nine o'clock 
yet ! I promised sister I would wake her promptly." Here he thrust 
one hand lazily under his pillow in search of his watch. "Oh thun- 
der," he growled, "I must have left it on the bureau — but I could have 
sworn I put it under my pillow. Well, I guess there's no help for it." 
Here he swung himself lazily out of bed and strolled over to the 
dresser. "Humph ! Looks like somebody got here before me. I 
don't see my watch, my purse," he turned and gazed around the room, 
"or, by thunder, my clothes either!" At first he looked puzzled; then 
he began a thorough search. jSTone of the missing articles were to be 
found. Suddenly a bright idea seemed to come to him. "How silly 
of me," he chuckled, "I might have suspected that sister would try 
and play some joke on me." 

Hastily throwing on slippers and dressing-gown, he crossed the hall 
and knocked at the opposite door. 

"What is it ?" called a sleepy voice. 

"It must be time to get up, sister," said Rob. "I can't find my 
watch, but know it must be late." He listened for, and fully expected 
to hear a giggle; but was disappointed. 

"You can't find your watch ? Why, Bobbie, what do you mean ? 
You had it when you went to your room last night !" said Margaret in 
surprise. 

"Look here, sister. We haven't time to ioke about this affair. The 



88 The St. Mabt's Muse. 

game is going to be at eleven, so if you want to get there on time you 
better give me my clothes !" 

"Your clothes? Why Bob, what on earth are you talking about?" 

The genuine surprise in her tone immediately convinced Rob that 
she knew nothing about his belongings. 

"Margaret," he said gravely, "last night my room was entered. My 
watch, money and clothes were taken. I guess I am in a pretty fix 
now. What in thunder am I going to do ?'" 

"Do ! Goodness only knows. What are you going to wear to the 
game ?" 

"The Lord only knows !" he sighed. Quiet for a moment ; then, "I 
say, couldn't you hustle and dress, then go to the office and 'phone for 
a suit of clothes for me ? You know I simply have to go to the game !" 

Clemson and Davidson were going to play football on Thanksgiving, 
in Columbia. Rob Coles had come from Davidson to see the game. 
His sister, Margaret, and his aunt had joined him at the hotel. 

About twenty minutes after the conversation recorded above, there 
was a knock on Rob's door. 

"Come in," he called. 

"Bobbie," said Margaret, as she entered his room, "I am distressed, 
but you know this is Thanksgiving, and so of course all the stores are 
closed. What are you going to do?" 

Rob thought a minute, then said, "I don't very well see how I can 
borrow clothes when I am in a strange hotel. But, after coming all 
the way from Davidson, I am certainly going to see that game. I am 
going, sister, if I have to wear some of your clothes !" 

"Don't be absurd, Rob ! You couldn't get one of my skirts over your 
shoulders — much less make it meet around the waist. Oh, I'll tell 
you what," she cried, her eyes twinkling, "I bet you could wear some 
of Aunt Sarah's clothes !" 

Away she whisked, returning with an arm full of clothes. "You 
are willing aren't you, Bob ?" she asked. It is your only possible 
chance of getting to the game !" 

"Of course I mind it," he growled ; "what fellow likes to be made a 
fool of ? But I have got to see that game. So let's make the best of 



The St. Mary's Muse. 89 

a bad business. Hurry up and dress me. For mercy's sake, tell me 
which of these things you put on first!" 

Half an hour later Rob surveyed himself in the mirror. He had on 
a black dress of his aunt's, a black widow's bonnet, with a long black 
crepe veil. 

"Say, I don't look half bad, do I?" he asked with a satisfied grin. 

"No, indeed ! You make a grand widow ! That black hides your 
face just splendidly. Come, pick up your skirts ; we will have to 
hurry if we want to catch that car." 

They reached the ball grounds just as the game was about to start, 
and had a fine view from their seat on the grandstand. At first Rob 
behaved with "widowly" dignity — then the Davidson team made a 
touchdown. In his wild joy, Rob forgot that he was masquerading as 
a widow — he forgot everything except the fact that his dear team was 
winning. In his excitement he let out a regular warwhoop and 
madly waved his arms up and down. Margaret tried to stop him. 
but all in vain. People were watching the enthusiastic widow with 
amazement ! The widow, totally unconscious of the excitement he 
was creating, was suddenly brought back to the realization of tho 
situation by the sound of splitting cloth. He glanced at Margaret 
with an agonized expression. 

"What tore," he pleaded, and, "does it show ?" 

"No, dear, but for Heaven's sake compose yourself. Here comes 
Nancy Latimer. Oh Rob, I will have to introduce you to her in this 
garb and I did want her to get crazy about you. She never will after 
meeting you in this get-up !" 

"Thunderation !" growled Rob. "This is just my luck! Intro- 
duce me as your dear friend, Mrs. Mason ; but swear you won't tell 
her who I am. My, but she is stunning!" 

By this time Nancy Latimer had joined them. Margaret had in- 
troduced Mrs. Mason to Miss Latimer, but while doing this she man- 
aged to place herself between Nancy and Rob. 

"Rob," she whispered, "please remember what you have on. If 
you make another racket like that, the policeman will be over here to 
arrest you on the charge of "disorderly conduct." 



90 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Kob grit his teeth and vowed, silently, not to betray himself, The 
game ended in Davidson's victory. Eob's joy simply had to have 
some outlet, so, in spite of his sister's warning hand, on his arm, he 
tried to do a double shuffle on his way to the car. His feet got hope- 
lessly tangled up in his skirts and he fell in a heap just as he reached 
the corner. Several gentlemen, who were standing near-by, rushed 
to his assistance. After some minutes struggle they succeeded in get- 
ting him to his feet and then into the car. 

"What a peculiar way for a widow to act," whispered Nancy. 

"Don't mind that, dear," whispered Nancy, "there is a streak of 
lunacy in the Mason family." 

"Margaret, you know you promised to dine with me to-day. I am 
awfully sorry your Aunt Sarah is sick — and I am truly distressed 
over Eob's not being here, but I am going to hold you to your word. 
You and Mrs. Mason must come with me right now. If you are 
half as hungry as I am, you will not hesitate long." 

Margaret glanced from one to the other — then with difficulty, keep- 
ing her face straight, she said : 

"Thank you, dear, we will be delighted!" 

Rob groaned inwardly; outwardly he bowed and smiled his thanks 
to Nancy. The Latimer's house was reached in safety. Nancy pre- 
ceded them up the stairs. At the door she paused — 

"Mother has gone away, so we will have to keep house for the boys 
to-day. Hope you all don't mind" — she laughed and then, turning to 
Mrs. Mason, said, "I have only six brothers !" 

Rob was getting desperate. The thought had just occurred to him 
that he couldn't go to dinner with his bonnet and veil. What was he 
going to do ? He looked to Margaret for help, but she was chatting 
away with Nancy. 

"Let's go upstairs, take off our hats and fix our hair before dinner," 
called Nancy, as she ran lightly up the winding staircase. "Marga- 
ret, I want to show you what I made yesterday. It is a dear; its just 
perfectly precious ! Why, what's the matter" — she stopped in amaze- 
ment and looked from her friend to Mrs. Mason. They were standing 
undecided at the foot of the stairs. Mrs. Mason looked horrified! 
Margaret broke into an uncertain laugh. Hob swore under his breath ! 



The St. Mary's Muse. 91 



''Come on," cried Nancy, "oh what is the matter?" 

"Matter enough !" growled Mrs. Mason, savagely. 

"Margaret, tell me what is the matter, this instant, demanded 
Xancy, "What are yon having hysterics over ?" 

"Oh," gasped Margaret, "don't yon see? Oh it is all so ridiculous! 
Rob's clothes got stolen !" 

"Was that why he didn't go to the game ? But Margaret, why does 
the recollection of that overcome you nowf" 

"But, Nancy," giggled Margaret, "can't you see % Don't you 
understand ? Mrs. Mason — Mrs. Mason's !" 

Xancy turned abruptly to gaze at the lady in question. One glance 
at her wrathful face and ISTancy had grasped the situation. 

"Rob !" she ejaculated. Mrs. Mason — Rob ?" 

Margaret nodded. "Yes, Mrs. Mason is Rob. He was determined 
to go to the game and it was his only way" — she paused irresolute. 

"Yes, by thunder it is I," cried Rob, striding over toward Miss 
Latimer. "I swore I wouldn't miss the game, and I didn't" ; mean- 
while he thought to himself, "She is as pretty as a peach. Lord, 
those eyes ! Poor me, I'm gone already." 

"Miss Latimer," he said extending his hand, "I am awfully glad to 
have met you !" His voice rang wonderfully sincere. 

"And I," she cried, smiling, "wouldn't take anything for this man- 
ner of meeting." 



"Old Man." 



AGNES TINSLEY HARRISON. 



The Old Man had been sitting on the side porch all alone for a long 
time. He got up slowly and walked down toward the end of the 
lawn. As he drew near the terrace a little white sunbonnet peeped 
from behind a wall. A slight flush swept over his face, but his pace 
did not quicken. With his habitual gravity he took the tiny hand of 
a maid of five and led her to a seat under a spreading magnolia. Per- 
haps you wonder why an old man wished to tell a little maiden that 
he loved her more than all the world ? But our Old Man was just six 
years old, and yet his manners were old, his ideas were old, his voice 
2 



92 The St. Mary's Muse. 



was old ; in fact, everything about him was old except his age. For 
this he was known as "Old Man." 

Old Man began talking gravely to his little maid. 

"Margie, if I saw a tiger coming I would not be afraid, I would 
protect you; Fs not afraid of nothing. If I was with you I would 
fight anything for you." 

It was just at this moment that a cow's head was seen around the 
corner. It was Betsy the Butter, and she was loose; a few bounds 
and she would be upon the children. With a cry Margie ran toward 
the house, the cow closely following; but Old Man stepped in front 
of Betsy: "Don't you dare touch my lady." His voice was made 
even a little slower, but no louder ; no more excited by the angry 
creature. The animal obeyed, but, instead of leaving Margie uncon- 
cious, left Old Man lying on the ground. 

For many weeks the home of Old Man was very still. Every day 
a mother's anxious face bent over a tiny bed. The first day the little 
sufferer gained consciousness his mama read a queer little note to him. 

"I luves you now and always." Margie/'' 

Old Man's face brightened. 

"Mama," he whispered, "I'm terrible glad Betsy butted me." 

Both little eyes closed and he slept quietly. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Rebe Shields, Alice L. Hines, Editors. 



Mr. riackett's Visit to St. Mary's. 

During his stay in Raleigh Mr. Hackett, who is this winter starring 
in the very strong play, "Classmates," was kind enough to come up 
to St. Mary's and give us girls a very charming talk. His manner 
in speaking was graceful and easy and he did not make us feel as if 
he was trying to make an impression, but was only having a friendly 
conversation on subjects that he happened to know more about than 
we did. 

His talk was mainly about Shakespeare. He told us of his own 
impressions and experiences during his visit to the home of the play- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 93 

wrigbt at Stratford on the Avon. Then he gave little selections from 
several plays and interpreted the writer's meaning by tones of voice, 
gesture, etc. He laid much stress on the student of Shakespeare's 
throwing away, in the main, his commentaries, arguing that surely 
more was to be gained by knowing the actual passage and trying to 
find the writer's meaning by thought, than by being able to quote 
what "somebody said" Shakespeare meant by such and such a passage. 

In connection with Shakespeare and the stage, Mr. Hackett spoke 
of the aim of the actors of to-day to make the theater a force working 
for culture. Especially should the actor attend to his pronunciation 
and enunciation, and thereby set a standard for us too careless 
speakers. 

Mr. Hackett was so full of his part in "Classmates" that he was 

unable to leave without a few words as to the play. He gave us a 

brief outline of its general subject and told us something in connection 

with his visit to West Point, where he went to get "local color," as 

two of the scenes are laid there. Therefore, we were ready fully to 

enjoy and appreciate "Classmates" when a great many of us saw it 

that night. 

Mr. James Young. 

On Monday morning, October fifth, Mr. James Young, who was in 
Raleigh playing in "Brown of Harvard," came up to the school and 
gave us a short talk. He talked principally about Hamlet ; and the 
fact that he emphasized more than anything else was that Hamlet was 
not mad, neither was he a weakling, but was all the time in full pos- 
session of his mental powers, which were great. We enjoyed his talk 
very much indeed, and it increased our interest in him, and there- 
fore made us enjoy all the more seeing him in the afternoon as "Tom 

Brown of Harvard." 

The Fair. 

The State Fair this year was attended and enjoyed by an unusually 

large number of our girls. Immediately after lunch on Wednesday, 

parties under the chaperonage of either Misses Gould, Thomas, Pix- 

ley, Jones, Kellogg or Mr. Stone set out prepared (as far as good humor 

and fat pocketbooks were concerned) to "take in the whole thing." 

The various exhibits were particularly good. 



94 The St. Mart's Muse. 



Besides the usual number of side shows, "flying jennies," "merry 
widow swings," etc., there were new delights and wonders. Last year 
nobody even dreamed of wandering through a "Katzenjainmer Kastle !" 
and who ever thought of seeing a "really truly" air ship come flying 
right over St. Mary's ? 

Probably the thing of the most immediate interest to us was the 
eagerly anticipated football game between Georgetown and A. and M. 
Quite a number of our girls went and I am sure each one did her 
part in yelling for old A. and M. A grand winding up to our holi- 
day was A. and M.'s victory, celebated by a torch-light serenade. 
The Sigma Lambda Reception. 

On Saturday evening, October 17, 1908, the Sigma Lambda Liter- 
ary Society gave its annual reception to its new members in the par- 
lor. The room was very prettily decorated with autumn leaves arid 
ferns. The guests were received by the President of the Society, 
Miss Minnie Leary, and the other officers, Misses Georgia Hales, Mary 
Shuford, Passie May Ottley, Rebe Shields, Lena Everett, Janie Du- 
Bose, Lily Taylor and Esther Rembert. Misses Nora Belle Rosser, 
Marjorie Brown and Bessie Arthur presided over the punch bowls, 
and with the punch were served delicious refreshments. 

After the reception dancing was enjoyed by all the girls. 
The Epsilon Alpha Pi Reception. 

The annual reception of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society, 
given in honor of its new members, was held in the parlor on Satur- 
day evening, October 24, 1908. The room was beautifully decorated 
with ferns, flowers and bright autumn leaves. The receiving party 
consisted of the President of the Society, Miss Sallie Haywood Battle, 
and her fellow-officers, Misses Ida Rogerson, Eva Rogerson, Annie 
Wood, Julia Mclntyre, Minnie Hazard, Paula Hazard, Laura Meares 
and Nell Lewis. After being welcomed by these, the guests were 
served to dainty refreshments. The punch bowls, set in clusters of 
autumn leaves, were presided over by Misses Erankie Self and Ila 
Rountree, and Misses Mary Bourne and Mary Kipps. The enjoy- 
ment of the evening was added to by some delightful music by Miss 
Frankie Self. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 95 



School Notes. 



— Alice Vaxiderford was made very happy by a visit from her 
mother this month. 

— We are all delighted to have Lovina Eldredge back with us again. 
— Emily and Elizabeth Marriott enjoyed a visit from their mother 
during Fair week. 

— Several girls went to hear Thomas Xelson Page lecture at the 
Raney Library on October the thirteenth. 

— We all regret that Maud Monroe and May Hoke have had to 
leave school on account of ill health. 

— Rose Shuford, an old St. Mary's girl, and Mary Shuford's sister, 
spent several days in Raleigh and was a frequent visitor at St. Mary's, 

— Every one was very glad to see Maud Bunn, one of last year's 
girls, at St. Mary's during the Fair. 

— A crowd of girls went to the Georgetown-A. & M. football game 
during Fair week. 

— Janie Patrick's brother came to see her during Fair week. 

— Alice Hines has enjoyed a short visit from her parents. 

— Several girls went to hear the Shubert String Quartet at the 
Baptist University on the fifteenth. 

— Mildred Borden's brother made her a short visit during Fair 
week. 

— Clara Hines's mother and father spent several days with her this 
month. 

— Esther Rembert's uncle made her a short visit this month. 

— Lucy's Harrison's sister, Mrs. H. L. Hoover, spent several days 
with her this month. Mrs. Hoover, who now lives in Leaksville, 
X. C, is an old St. Mary's girl, so she was especially welcome at St. 
Mary's. Lucy was indeed fortunate, for her mother, Mrs. A. S. Har- 
rison, of Enfield, and her brother, Mr. George Harrison, of Mayodan, 
were both up to see her during Fair week. 



96 The St. Mary's Muse. 



— Alice Xoble's father, Professor Noble, of the University of 
Xorth Carolina, came to see her during Fair week. 

— Bessie Arthur went to Morganton this month for Margaret Du- 
Bose's wedding. 

— A number of girls went to see Adelaide Thurston in ''The Wo- 
man's Hour" on October the thirteenth. 

— Cantey Venable, an old St. Mary's girl, spent several days at St. 
Mary's during Fair week. 

— Mary Bawls Gilliam and Helen Bobinson enjoyed seeing their 
brothers during Fair week. 

— Bebe Shields's uncle came to see her during the month. 

— Martha Byrd Spruill lately enjoyed a short visit home. 

— Every one was delighted to have Xell Kintner, one of last year's 
girls, with us for several days. 

— Martha Byrd Spruill recently had a visit from her father. 

— Georgia and Lorna Hales also enjoyed a visit from their mother 
during the month. 

— During the Fair week the girls had the opportunity of seeing 
two good plays. On Tuesday night quite a number went to see 
"Adelaide Thurston" in "The Woman's Hour." On Wednesday night 
the musical comedy, "The Bunaways," was seen by several of the girls. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = z = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Mtjse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. kaleigh, N. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1908-'09. 

Mary Campbell Shuford, Editor in Chief. 

Ida Jean Rogerson, Business Manager. 

Rebe Hill Shields, ) xr„„ ro raj( „„ Minnie Hazard, ) T ; tm „^ra:^«, 

Alice Leigh Hines, j ^ ews Editors. Lena EyeeetT) •} Literary Editors. 

Paula Hazard, Associate Editor. Annie C. Wood, Associate Editor. 

Laura Meares, Exchange Editor. 
Frances Bottom, Assistant Business Manager. 

EDITORIAL. 



Founder's Day. 



All Saints' Day (Xovember 1st), which fell this year on Sunday, is 
especially clear to St. Mary's, for, besides its importance as a feast of 
the Church, it has for years been observed by the School as Founders' 
Day, w T hen the thoughts of all turn toward those who have had much to 
do with the life and progress of the School. 

Sixty-six years ago St. Mary's had its first opening, and throughout 
all the ensuing years it has been building for itself such a name and 
reputation that we, looking backward from this present year, can justly 
boast of our Alma Mater. 



School Spirit. 



Elsew T here in this issue of the monthly Muse there is an article on 
the all-important question of "School Spirit," which we would like 
all members of St. Mary's to "read, mark, learn, and inwardly di- 
gest." It is a very sad state of affairs when any St. Mary's girl con- 
siders it "smart" to speak slightingly of the school. Of course we all 
love St. Mary's and are proud to be called St. Mary's girls, but how 



98 The St. Mart's Muse. 

can this be made known to outsiders and to new girls, if we speak in 
this way? If we would all just remember that every disparaging 
word we speak of school matters tends to discourage "school spirit." 
that is, the love which we bear toward the school and the interest 
which one takes in its affairs, we would be more careful of our nn- 
thoughted criticisms. 



The Literary Societies. 



Now that the school year is well advanced and the new girls have 
become members of one or the other of the two Literary Societies, 
it seems fitting that a few words be said concerning the societies and 
their work : 

First of all, the girls should remember that the societies belong to 
them; that they make up the societies, and therefore, that each indi- 
vidual member should endeavor to contribute something toward the 
work and life of her own society. If she can do nothing else, she 
can at least take an interest, and urge others to take an interest, in 
the work — for enthusiastic interest lies at the foundation of the suc- 
cess of the societies. There is too little active individual part taken 
in the literary programs, the successful carrying out of which is in 
the hands, not of the President and other officers alone, but also in 
the hands of all the members. But especially does interest need to be 
aroused with reference to the debates. If the members realized the 
benefit they could derive from entering into the debates, they would 
surely take more part in the discussion of the various subjects, when 
the debates are opened to the societies. The practice thus gained 
would be of great advantage to them should they ever, after leaving 
St. Mary's, become members of literary clubs or of other organiza- 
tions. Let every girl, therefore, really think on the subjects for de- 
bate, and when the time comes, express her own thoughts and opinions 
and freely discuss, not only the questions in the debate, but any other 
subjects that might come up in the meetings. Each member must 
feel that every matter, of whatever kind, which is brought up, con- 
cerns her as well as the others, and she should, accordingly, show an 
interest in it. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 99 

The rivalry between the societies is also too lukewarm. It seems 
probable, however, that as each girl takes a greater interest and pride 
in her own society, and works earnestly for its growth and success, a 
more lively, friendly contention between the two societies will be 
aroused. The several joint meetings of the societies to be held dur- 
ing the year will, it is hoped, also contribute toward this end. 



With the Exchanges. 



Of the pleasant features connected with the publication of a student 
paper, one of the most pleasant is the coming of the exchanges from 
the other colleges and schools. Xo matter how big our interest before, 
how keen our appreciation of the joys and troubles of our fellows living 
under like circumstances, an hour or two with the magazines from here 
and there — the "big fellows" and the "little fellows" — always gives us 
a keener appreciation, a broader interest — and we leave them with a 
feeling of inspiration that helps us in all departments of our school life. 

All this, of course, is dependent on our view-point and our expecta- 
tion. Merely a glance at the outside is refreshing and inspiring if we 
will let it refresh and inspire. For a glimpse at the cover tells us 
much. This visitor has come down to us from the Maine woods; here 
is the representative of the metropolitan high school ; here the weekly 
of the Florida college; on this side we find the dignified magazine of 
the "Class A" college ; below it a breezy visitor from the University of 
Utah ; and again, the literary magazine of one of the larger institu- 
tions of Texas ; and mingled with these visitors bringing us more or 
less in touch with the schools and colleges of all the States — Xorth. 
South, East and West — are the "familiar friends" of the schools near 
at hand — university, college and high school — each representing its 
school in its own way and each with a common purpose — to keep up 
to the ideals of its past and to progress. 

The covers and make-up of the student-magazines improve year by 
year and the contents keep apace. The form, the size, the style, the 
purpose of the publications vary with the conditions which produce 
them, but he must be a pessimist indeed who does not feel that, as a 
whole, they are most creditable. 



100 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Our magazine has been so late in beginning its appearance this season 
that we are doubly appreciative of the friends that have reached us 
without a reminder from us — and it is very pleasant to note that most 
of those "nearest and dearest" have come to greet us. The University 
of North Carolina Magazine with its pretty new white cover, the 
Wake Forest Student still in its conservative brown, our old friend 
Red and White of the 1ST. C. A. & M. College, and the Guilford Colle- 
gian in its Quaker gray are all before us. We miss the Davidson Col- 
lege Magazine and the Trinity Archive, but hope that before another 
month they will have come to join their brothers. Our North Carolina 
sister magazines are not so mindful of us. We look as yet in vain for 
The Acorn of the Baptist University, and the State Normal Magazine. 
and the College Message of Greensboro Female College. We have had 
the pleasure as yet of welcoming only The Chatterbox of Littleton. 
More mindful, or more prompt than we, are the South Carolinians and 
Virginians: The Concept, ever neat and worth while; the Winthrop 
College Journal, still red and still debating; and the Palmetto, of the 
College for Women are here. The Tattler, of Randolph-Macon Wo- 
man's College, up to its ever high standard ; the Emory and Henry Era. 
the Erskinian of due west; the Mercerian; the Western Maryland 
College Monthly; — each have their message. 

Pleasant always to note is the spread of the high school magazine 
and the improvement in them. The High School Folio of the Flush- 
ing High School, Greater New York, and the Quill of Staten Island 
Academy — have been valued exchanges for years: but in the last yeai 
or two our North Carolina High Schools have developed a very credit 
able group of papers: the Raleigh Enterprise; Durham Messenger; 
Greensboro High School Magazine; Goldsboro High School Magazine, 
Wilmington Tileston Topics, and New Bern Athenian; with the Parle 
School Gazette of Trinity Park School. We congratulate each of them 
and wish them continued success and development. 

The Horce Scholasticce of St. Paul's, Concord (Mr. Lay's old school), 
ranks high among the student periodicals of the North, and in its well 
ordered simplicity is ever a welcome visitor ; while from the other end 
of the country we are glad to receive this session the Stetson Weekly 
Collegiate of Deland, with the news of the Florida colleges. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 101 

There are many old friends that have not yet reached us, but some 
are doubtless not yet out and some may have overlooked us. We hope 
to have them with us another month. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN. 



Clippings from the Exchanges and Elsewhere. 



The Old Maid of Nantasket. 

There was an old maid of Nantasket 
Who never stirred out of the house, 

But she carried her eat in a basket 
For fear of meeting a mouse. 



John C. Sprowls. 
There was a young man named John C. Sprowls, 

Who wished to do what was right, 
So he spent all he had in smoked glasses for owls, 

That they might see in daylight. 



Willie tried, with boyish zest, 
To dissect a hornet's nest. 
When to mama he was brung, 
Willie looked a little — stung! — Ex. 



There are meters of accent, 
There are meters of tone, 

But the best way to meter 
Is to meet her alone. 

There are letters of accent, 
There are letters of tone, 
But the best way to letter 
Is to let 'er alone. 



He failed in German, flunked in chem. 

They heard him softly hiss; 
"I'd like to find the man who said 

That 'ignorance is bliss.' " — Ex. 



102 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Unappreciated. 

Jimraie is at the age where the form pales before the substance. At the last 
party he went to, the principal dainty of the supper was delicate creamed chicken 
served in pretty frilled paper cases. On his return he was put through the usual 
catechism. 

"And what did you have to eat?" 

"Huh! nothing but hash in candle-shades!'" — »S'. F. B. 



City Chap — "Come, let's go to the poolroom." 
Greenhorn — "I can't swim." — Ex. 



A green little freshman in a green little way 

Some chemicals mixed just for fun one day; 

And the green little grasses now tenderly wave 

O'er the green little freshman's green little grave. — Ex. 



Miss T. in N. English — "What were some of the influences on the English language 
of the Anglo-Saxon period?" 

I. R. — "Well, the Scandinavian peninsula came over to Britain and brought a 
great many words." 



A little boy of seven owned a pet dog named "Dixie." The dog had a habit of 
running away, so one day the little boy's father tied Dixie fast under the house. 
The dog whined all day, much to the distress of his little master, who finally could 
stand it no longer. So he went out to comfort the dog and put his arms around his 
neck and said, "Don't cry, Dixie; all dogs be's tied sometimes." 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ckuikshank - - - - Alumme Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

IMrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Mrs. I. M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 
Mrs. F. P. Tucker, Raleigh, 
Mrs.Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL. 



Founders' Day Meetings. 



It was a great disappointment that it proved impossible to get the 
November Muse into the hands of the Alumnae before Founders' Day. 
We had hoped that not only could the movement in the towns and cities 
where the Founders' Day Meetings were held last year be extended 
and strengthened this year, but that individual members of the Alumna? 
with Muse in hand might have St. Mary's Meetings each for herself 
where circumstances would not permit of the two or three coining to- 
gether in one place. But those who thought of St. Mary's this All 
Saints' did so without the help of the Muse. We know not how many 
there were of them, but we hope they were very many. 

Owing to the lack of united program there was no special reason this 
year why reports of the Alumna? Meetings should reach the Muse, but' 
accounts of several are before us, and we hope that there were many 
others as yet unreported. Instead of waiting, the reports of these 
meetings with other news of especial interest to the Alumna? will be 
embodied in the December Alumna? Muse, which will appear in about 
two weeks. Members of the Alumna? who chance to read this notice 
are urgently requested to bring it to the attention of other Alumna? 
and to join in contributing any matter which may be of interest. 



104 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Founders' Day, 1909. 

All Saints' this year falling on Sunday, the day was not marked as 
distinctly as is usually the case. The Rector, at the morning service 
in the Chapel, used for the first time at St. Mary's the "Bidding 
Prayer," which has been for many years a distinctive feature of the 
Founders' Day Exercises at St. Paul's. At this morning All Saints : 
Service it was also the pleasure of the present generation of St. Mary's 
to have with them for the service and later at dinner, three of the 
oldest living Alumnae of the School: Miss Ellen Brownlow, formerly 
of Greenville; Mrs. Delia (Haywood) Gray and Mrs. Whitaker, all now 
making their home at St. Luke's Home, Raleigh. A number of the 
local Alumnse responded to the invitation to be present at the evening 
service, which was especially in commemmoration of Founders' Day. 
when the Rector spoke feelingly of the Founder and his work, and 
influence. 

The regular meeting of the local Alumnee was held in the parlor at 
4:30 on November 2d at the call of the President, Mrs. Iredell. 



The Clement Legacy. 



]STo matter has been for some time of more general interest to all 
interested in St. Mary's than the amount and disposal of the Clement 
Legacy, which becomes available through the death of Miss O'Connor, 
in August. No definite information in the matter is yet at hand, bu 
it is hoped that the first of the much desired new buildings will now be 
forthcoming. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 105 



— w^— MWM*JMa«a«fcmM*« 



IN MEMORIAM. 
Dr. Peter E. h|ines. 

July 28, 1828— August 14, 1908, 

Through the rectorates of Dr. Bennett Smedes, Dr. Bratton and Mr. 
DuBose, Dr. Hines attended the family of the Rector of St. Mary's 
and was generally the physician of the school. Hence for more than 
thirty years we knew his earnest zeal, his marked ability, and unre- 
mitting kindness. 

The little children of the Rectors, whom he had watched over from 
babyhood, were deeply attached to him, and many a homesick girl did 
he comfort with his sympathy and kind ministrations. The last visit 
of his long life of loving service was paid to Miss Saunders, his friend, 
whom he had attended with the faithfulness which characterized all 
that he did until he himself, ill, was forced to give up all active practice. 

It is fitting that St. Mary's should speak her gratitude and appre- 
ciation of his able service and great unselfishness. 

The thoughts of many are well expressed in the words of an old 
pupil of St. Mary's — afterwards a teacher in the school — in a recent 
letter : 

"I feel I must send a word of heartfelt appreciation of the 
splendid services of one whom St. Mary's especially loved and 
honored. Dr. Hines and his work are to me bound up in my 
memories of the dear old school, and I can recall the many 
times his presence brought relief and comfort. 

"I remember one special instance of a great kindness to a 
needy student, and of course this is but one of countless similar 
kindnesses, but it has always seemed to me eminently charac- 
teristic and I have often told it in speaking of Dr. Hines." 



106 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Miss O'Connor. 

1820-1908. 

My most vivid recollections on entering St. Mary's as a child not yet 
nine years old is of "Miss Frank," as the girls all called Miss O'Connor. 
Tall, handsome and dignified, with a smile which took away all fear 
from the most timid of the little girls committed to her care, she kept 
perfect order in "her room" without deeming to exercise any authority, 
and the children all loved her. 

She did not come with Dr. Smedes to St. Mary's in 1842, but she 
must have followed very soon. Once since "The War" she made a 
visit to St. Mary's in company with her dear friend, Miss Clement, in 
whose school in Germantown, Pa., she had taught many years, and 
with whom she had made her home after that school had passed into 
other hands. 

Of the attachment between these two, Miss Clement and Miss O'Con- 
nor, one may judge from Miss Clement's care of her old companion 
while she lived and her generous provision for her by will. 

A friend who knew and loved them both, writing to Mrs. Leak, 
speaks of Miss Frank's last days spent among those who loved her. 
She was nearly eighty-eight years old, with both mind and memory 
active until a. few weeks before her death, which occurred on the fourth 
of last August. She was laid to rest in Laurel Hill (Philadelphia) 
next to Miss Clement's and old Madame Clement's graves. M.. I. 



Alumnae Weddings. 



KITCH1N-CLAEK. 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry Irwin Clark 

invite you to be present 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Rebecca Calvert 

to 

Dr. Thurman Delna Kitchin 



The St. Mary's Muse. 107 

on the morning of Tuesday the third of November 

at quarter to ten o'clock 

Trinity Church 

Scotland Neck, North Carolina 



TAYLOR-HENDERSON. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Henderson 

request the pleasure of your company 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Mary Katheryne 

to 

Mr. Walter Parker Taylor 

on Saturday evening the seventh of November 

nineteen hundred and eight 

at eight o'clock 

Trinity Episcopal Church 

Asheville, N. C. 



ALEXANDER-SPRUTLE. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Shepherd Spruill 

request the honour of 

your presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Alice Winston 

to 

Mr. Thomas Willis Alexander 

on the evening of Wednesday the eighteenth of November 

at nine o'clock 

at the Church of the Good Shepherd 

Rocky Mount, North Carolina 



Notes of Interest to the Alumnae. 



We are glad to have word from Miss Batdorff. She is this year in 
charge of the Domestic Science courses at Grove City College, Grove 
City, Pa., and reports everything well. 



108 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Miss Elnora Williams (1905-06), after two years of teaching, moved 
with her family from Oxford to Durham last spring and this fall en- 
tered Trinity College for the regular course. 

Mildred Goodwin, of Raleigh, who began in the Primary Depart- 
ment of St. Mary's and left us in 1907, and who is this year at the 
Stuart School in Washington, gave a Dramatic Recital in the ball-room 
of the Shoreham Hotel on the afternoon of November 20th. She was 
assisted by several of her fellow-students. 

Mrs. Iredell, who has been, under much strain during the long illness 
of Dr. Hines, is taking a little rest at present in a visit to Miss Czar- 
nomska, in Cincinnati. As the Alumna? remember Miss Czarnomska 
after her able regime as Lady Principal at St. Mary's in the '80's, was 
for many years Professor of English Literature at Smith College and 
went from there three years ago to the University of Cincinnati, where 
she is Dean of Women. Miss McVea, it will be remembered, also is 
Assistant Professor of English in the same University. 

Miss Jane Iredell Green, '06, Secretary of the Wilmington Chapter 
of the Alumnse, in forwarding the minutes of that Chapter's Founders 
Day Meeting, writes : 

"I thought you would like to note the death of Mrs. John S. Holmes, 
who was formerly a pupil of St. Mary's. She was Miss Sallie London, 
of Wilmington, N. C, and lived here until 1892, when she with her 
husband and family moved to Jacksonville, Ela., which was still her 
home at the time of her death. She died very suddenly in September 
while in Wilmington on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. W. A. Wright. 
Mrs. Holmes was a woman of unusually fine character and was very 
much beloved in this community. 

"•Among the marriages occurring recently there were two of St. 
Mary's girls — Miss Frances Chadbourn to Dr. Jasper W. Stanley, on 
October 28th, 1908, and Miss Isabel Rountree to Mr. Van Renssalaer 
O. King, on Novembei 12th. Miss Mary Ella Moore will be married 
November 29th to Mr. Arthur Mills, of Greenville, S. C." 



RE0D !— NiflRK !-fICT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



' It's worth the difference ' 



WHARTON & TYREE 



" Workers in Artistic Photography ' 



ST. MARY'S CALENDARS FOR 1909. 
As pretty as heretofore; we think prettier. 



Orders received before December 1st filled 
at Fifty Cents each, postpaid. 



Ready December 10th. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO, 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FLNE SHOES SEE SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 



Mail orders rilled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVIL'LE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, ST. C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



Smith * Torrest Co. 



GROCER© 



216 FATETTEVILLE STREET 



THIS SPACE BELONGS TO 



A- WlUJi\iV\£ &v C02V\£i\]VY 

BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS 



WHY NOT? 

The verse you write 
You say is written; 

All rules despite, 
But not despitten. 

The gas you light 
Is never litten. 

The things you drank 
Were doubtless drunk; 

The boy you spank 
Is never spunk. 

A friend you thank 
But never thunk. 



. ROSENTHAL 
XCO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 
BANKING. 

All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
• : Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, - - $ 100,000.00 
Surplus, - - 100.000.00 

Deposits, - 1,175,000.00 

Assets, - 1,500,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO. 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Suppose you speak, 
Then you have spoken; 

But if you sneak 
You have not snoken. 

The shoes that squeak 
Have never squoken. 

A dog will bite, 
Likewise has bitten 

With all his might, 
But not his mitten. 

You fly your kite 
But not your kitten. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 

GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 

J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 


THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY. 

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW 

Ladies' Furnishings and Novelties. 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 


THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Candy — China. 

Pictures. Stationery. Toys, 


T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 

Fayetteville Street. 





Lives there a girl who has not said, 
"Tomorrow I'll get out of bed 
At six and get things done, 
Before the rising of the sun!" 

Lives there a girl who has not said, 
At six a. m., "How good this bed 
Does feel," and slept till after eight, 
Then wondered why she slept so late ! 



Teacher — "What was the extent of the Dark Ages?" 

Girl — "The Dark Ages extended from the fall of Rome to the Straits of Gibraltar. 



Sunday School Teacher — "What is an epistle, Willie?" 

Willie — "I don't know, ma'am, unless it's the wife of an apostle." 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBBINS' LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

'PHONES 81. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QJJINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 


J. SCHWARTZ, 
RICHMOND MARKET. 


H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds. 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 


Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBT. SIMPSON, Drug ^ffia etc. 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 


H. T. HICKS CO. 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

EALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 

Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 
Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 
Francis P. Venable, Pres., Chapel Hill, N. C. 



School Calendar, 1908-09 



November, 1908. 

November 1, Sunday — All Saints'; Founders' Day. 

November 9, Monday, 5:00 p. m. — Meeting of the Ealeigh Alumnae in the Parlor. 

November 11, Wednesday, 8:30 p. m. — Second Faculty Recital in the Chapel. Miss 

Bertha Luney, Organist, assisted by Miss Hull, Violinist, and Miss Gould, 

Soprano. 

November 21, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. 

November 26, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day; holiday. 

November 28, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. — St. Elizabeth's Chapter in Tableaux. 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 


/g&BROUGJ-nW^ 
[f/PRLNTLNG COAW 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD. 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pullen 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cash'r. Capital and Surplus 
S75,000. Four percent interest paid on deposits, 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 
66th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 17, 1908. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TEEMS. 

EASTER TEEM BEGINS JANUARY 21, 1909. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. 1HE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3. 1HE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offer$ instruction in these 

Departments: J ^ THE AR1 SCHOOL 



5. 1HE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1908-09 are enrolled 200 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Steinway Grand Pianos. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other infoiwation address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

RECTOR. 



Zhc 
%t. Mark's flfouse 

Christmas IHumber 




December, 1008 



IRaletgb, 1R. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

CHRISTMAS NUMBER. 

Vol. XIII. December, 1908. No. 4 



Christmas Morning. 



IBMA DEATON. 



The earth is sleeping 'neath the starry sky, 
No sound disturbs the stillness of the night; 

The moon looks calmly from her throne on high, 
The slumb'ring world is bathed in silent light. 

Hark! from yon tower that pierces the clear sky, 
A little bell rings through the stilly air; 

The morning dawns — the blessed Christmas morn— 
And never morning dawned on earth more fair. 

Now, one by one, the little stars grow dim, 
The moon fades slowly in the dawning light; 

The drowsy world awakes — is full of life, 
The Christmas spirit in each heart glows bright. 

Hail, happy day! hail, blessed Christmas morn! 

Whereon the angels sang our Saviour's birth; 
When rang the heavens with their songs of praise, 

And joy: "Good will to men, and peace on earth!' 



The Message of the Bells. 



IDA JEAN EOGEBSON. 
MARY C. SHUFOBD. 



It was ideal Christmas weather. The snow had been falling all 
day long and, about dusk, the crowd of young people at Mrs. Van Win- 
throp's house party, tired of snowballing, crowded into the cozy library, 
around the blazing wood fire, where with merry jest and rollicking fun 
they roasted chestnuts and warmed their numb fingers. 



110 The St. Maey's Muse. 



Mrs Van Winthrop's beautiful country home was always the scene 
of gayety, but the Christmas festivities this year were more than usually 
gay, for charming Dorothy Winston, the life of every house-party, 
seemed, more than ever, to have her curly head "chocked" full of 
pranks. 

"If you'll allow me to express my poor opinion," said Jack Manning 
to the merry group around the fire, "I think you all are carrying on 
entirely too silly a conversation. I propose we now behave with proper 
dignity — Dorothy Winston, stop scrapping with Tom and listen to me — 
as I was saying, behave with proper dignity; stop all foolishness, and 
each of us tell a rousing whopper of a story, to see which has most 
imagination. What do you say ?" 

"Listen to grandfather," retorted Dorothy, "proper dignity, indeed! 
I'd like to know who it was that chased me all around the lawn and 
washed my face half an hour ago ? He must think he has loads of 
imagination" (to the others). 

"Seriously, now," said Margaret DeLaney, "I think that would be 
lots of fun. We can all tell a 'sho' nuff' experience that has happened 
to us. I can tell you about that really-truly ghost I saw last winter." 

"All right, I'm willing," said Dorothy, "but doesn't it amuse you to 
see a hoy putting on airs ? I bet he has too much dignity to catch this 
grape" — and she laughingly pitched a grape at Jack, who discarded his 
mock dignity and dexterously caught it in his mouth. "Bravo," said 
she, "I knew you would drop your dignity when something to eat came 
flying by." 

"Humph," said Jack, shrugging his shoulders, "who ate two rolls for 
breakfast ?" 

"Well, I'm sure I didn't eat as much as you, if I did eat two rolls" — 
hotly began Dorothy. 

"For pity's sake, you two children stop fussing," broke in the others, 
laughing. "Go on, Dot, you tell us a story first." 

"Ladies and gentlemen," began Dorothy, springing to her feet and 
making a deep courtesy. "There was once upon a time a young gentle- 
man" — with a glance in Jack's direction — "who appeared to the world 
dignified, cool-headed and sensible, but when you knew him as I — er — 



The St. Mary's Muse. Ill 

I mean, as a few did, you found under his chilling exterior that he was 
a 'silly flirt,' who proposed to every girl he met." Here Jack moved 
uneasily and Tom punched him. "For example, one day I accidentally 
broke in upon a little 'touching' scene under the mistletoe. He — " 

"Dorothy Winston — if you don't hush — you know that's not true — 
I did no such thing," shouted Jack. There was a roar of laughter. 

"Great day, man," turning to him with a solemn face, "who said 
anything about you. Truth hurts in this case, I reckon, but there may 
be other 'silly flirts' in the world, you know." 

Just here Mrs. Van Winthrop came into the room. "It's about time 
for our new guest to arrive," she announced. The train is always late, 
though. Why there comes the carriage now," glancing out of the win- 
dow, "I'll bring him right in." 

"Is my hair all straight ? I wonder if he is good looking ? What 
is his name, any way? Mrs. Van Winthrop forgot to tell us," said 
Dorothy, all in one breath. 

Mrs. Van Winthrop ushered in the tall new comer. "By all that's 
holy," swore Jack under his breath, "Ruffin Gordon and Dot at this 
house party together after their great split up !" 

"Girls," said their hostess, "let me introduce to you the last member 
of our party — Miss DeLaney — Mr. Ruffin Gordon — Miss Winston — " 
"Dorothy heard a familiar voice, felt a familiar hand clasp, and found 
herself looking into the steady gray eyes of her one-time fiance. ''Dor- 
othy," he began softly, when Mrs. Van Winthrop interrupted, "How 
nice ! I had no idea you two knew each other." "Yes," said Dorothy, 
turning away, "I have met Mr. Gordon before." 

Jack saw this little aside, and detecting the tremor in his chum's 
voice, to save her from further embarrassment broke in with — "Hello, 
old man! Awful glad to see you — why didn't you let a fellow know 
you were coming ? Your're just in time to tell us one of those rousing 
good stories of yours. Eow don't back out, but sit right down." "Yes, 
do," chimed in every one, "your fame for story-telling has spread 
abroad, Mr. Gordon." 

"What's the matter, Dorothy, are you feeling badly? You look so 
pale," solicitously asked Mrs. Van Winthrop. Euflin, too, had noticed 
2 



112 The St. Maby's Muse. 

her paleness. Did she still really care? He felt again the old ache 
at his heart. Could she care after all those cruel words \ A sudden 
resolve formed itself in his mind. 

''Well, Pretty Girls and Good Fellows," he began laughingly, "I'll 
tell you what really happened to a friend of mine once, so let me get in 
the middle of the circle" — he took the chair by Dorothy — "and every 
one of you listen with all ears." 

"There was once," he was serious now, "a hot-headed impulsive man 
who was desperately in love with a charming girl, and he nattered him- 
self that she also cared for him. But because they loved so deeply they 
expected too much of each other, and the result was disappointment, 
cruel words on both sides, and a foolish quarrel. My friend went out 
West trying to deaden the pain at his heart, for he had begun to realize 
how much he had lost. But having so much pride and self-will, he 
could not bring himself to ask forgiveness, though he realized that he 
was in the wrong and that they two were spoiling their lives because of 
their foolish pride. But as his sense of pain and loss deepened he 
would willingly have gone to her and implored forgiveness, but he was 
held back by the fear that she no longer cared for him — that she had 
forgotten him, or that some one else had taken his place, and — " 

"I am sorry to break up this interested group, but you girls have 
about ten minutes to dress for dinner," said Mrs. Van Winthrop's 
pleasant voice in the doorway. 

"Oh ! I am so sorry," chimed in everybody except Dorothy, who was 
unnaturally silent. "At the most interesting point, too." "But you 
must finish it for us right after dinner, Mr. Gordon. !STow don't 
forget." With merry laughter they all hurried up stairs. Dorothy 
followed, glad of the interruption, eager to be alone. 

With troubled heart she started to unfasten her collar — Heavens! 
she had lost her locket ! With Puffin's picture in it, too ! "It must 
be in the library," she thought ; "I remember distinctly having it after 
I came in from the snow. I must get it. I wouldn't have him find it 
for anything." Pride again. 

Quietly she opened the door and slipped softly down the great oaken 
staircase and into the library. Intent upon her search she did not 



The St. Mary's Muse. 113 

notice the tall figure standing without the circle of firelight, until — 
"Dorothy, little girl — may I finish that story for them to-night, in the 
way I would give my son! to do?" The manly voice had grown deep 
with tenderness. "Dorothy," he went on, "why don't yon look at me ?" 
She lifted two bine eyes deep with tears, and here the silence of the 
room was broken by something beside the ticking of the clock and the 
crackling of the fire — 

"Oh, but you musn't," she objected. 

"But we are under the mistletoe," he protested. 

"Listen," said the girl. And standing there together they heard the 
Christmas chimes pealing out their message across the snow. "Peace 
on earth; good will toward men," she whispered softly. 



Light, Color, and Sound in the "Ancient Mariner." 



IRMA DEATON. 



In many of his poems Coleridge has shown himself a master of the 
use of light, color, and sound. He knew, as few others have known, 
the art of using just the right word in just the right way to give the 
desired effect. In the "Rime of the Ancient Mariner," especially; this 
happy faculty is shown in a marked degree. 

In the beginning of the poem, which describes the setting out of the 
ship, all is bright and merry, and we have the cheerful light of the sun. 
We do not have the moon, for her soft, subdued light would give us an 
impression of calmness and of that quiet happiness which is close akin 
to sorrow. Such an impression would scarcely be in keeping with the 
sailing of a jolly crew of mariners. If the sky had been overcast when 
the ship set sail, the sailors would not have had so fair a prospect; 
hence the contrast between the embarking and the fatal voyage would 
not be nearly so great. Thus we see that the poet selected the very best 
possible kind of light for this first scene. 

Now let us pass to the next scene. The ship has been driven to the 
land of mist and snow ; — 

"And through the drifts, the snowy elifts 
Did send a dismal sheen." 



114 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Can we imagine any cheerfulness on the part of the mariners as they 
are surrounded by that dismal half-light? Its gloom is expressive of 
the despair within the hearts of the men. The sun's face is veiled in 
mist as though he has already foreseen the crime which is soon to be 
perpetrated. But just when the mariners have almost lost hope, comes 
an albatross, and the light changes. They have not yet come into the 
open sea, but 

"... all the night, through fog — smoke white, 
Glimmers the white moonshine." 

Here we do not have the sun's light because the joy of the mariners 
is not a joy that makes them merry ; they are filled with a quiet thank- 
fulness which is reflected in the moon's white light. There is hope of 
deliverance, but no certainty; hence the moon shines through fog and 
not in her clear brightness. 

As the ship sails back toward the north, the light changes gradually 
until, as it nears the equator, — 

"Nor dim nor red, like God's own head, 
The glorious Sun uprist." 

Hope has almost ripened into certainty, and the mariners, in the 

prospect of deliverance, become partners in their companion's crime by 

agreeing to it for selfish reasons. But ah, what sorrow awaits them ! 

We have an idea of the suffering of the sailors even before we are told 

of it, from the stanza : 

"All in a hot and copper sky, 
The bloody Sun at noon; 
Right up above the mast did stand, 
No bigger than the moon." 

We know that something dreadful must happen when Nature is thus 
so strange and weird. The same sun which shone so bright when the 
ship set sail — which looked down, as through a veil, upon the hopeful 
sailors in the land of mist and snow, bringing them fresh hope and com- 
fort, is now the cause of their sore distress. Can we conceive anything 
more awful than a bloody sun in a copper sky ? This glaring, scorch- 
ing light burns, as it were, their hopes. Night brings no relief! for 
then the light is that of the dancing death-fires. There is not one ray 
of hope. When the despairing sailors first behold the specter-ship, hope 



The St. Mary's Muse. 115 

springs up within their hearts, they feel that rescue is near, and, corre- 
sponding to this hope, is the appearance of the sun : 

"The western wave was all aflame, 

The day was well-nigh done! 
Almost upon the western wave, 
Rested the broad bright sun." 

But when the ship drives between them and the sun, and they see 
that it is only the skeleton of a ship, their hopes are gone. The sun 
peers through her ribs "with broad and burning face." The substitu- 
tion of the word "burning" for "bright," which was used in the pre- 
ceding stanza, gives an entirely different effect. The change corre- 
sponds to the change in the feelings of the mariners. Then : 

"The sun's rim dips; the stars rush out; 
At one stride comes the dark." 

There is utter darkness except for the ghastly, gleaming light of the 

steersman's lantern, 

"Till elomb above the eastern bar, 
The horned moon with one bright star, 
Within the nether tip." 

The moon's pale light lends ghastliness to the scene of death ; there is 

nothing bright or cheerful in it. Later, the slow rising of the moon in 

all her beauty seems to me to correspond with the welling up of the 

spring of love in the mariner's heart. Perhaps I may overdraw the 

comparison, but it seems to me that by the lines — 

"And the rain poured down from one black cloud, 
The moon was at its edge." 

and by the stanza following, we are given the impression that help is 
near, even though the prospect is now very gloomy: for, as the moon 
remains at the edge of the cloud, so even yet a ray of hope shines oat 
from behind the black cloud of despair. The angelic spirits who come 
into the bodies of the dead men are in perfect harmony with the soft 
moonlight, even though the weirdness of the scene is enhanced by the 
paleness of that radiance. We can readily see that the desired effect 
would not be produced if the spirits should be present during the day. 
Lastly, the return of the mariner takes place by moonlight: 



116 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"We drifted o"er the harbor bar, 
And I with sobs did pray; — 
Oh, let me be awake, my God! 
Or let me sleep alway! 

"The harbor bay was clear as glass, 

So smoothly was it strewn! 
And on the bay the moonlight lay, 
And the shadow of the moon. 

"The rock shone bright, the kirk no less, 
That stands above the rock; 
The moonlight steeped in silentness, 
The steady weathercock." 

Could we have a truer picture of perfect rest and quiet ? And the 
appearance of Xature is in perfect harmony with the wonderful joy of 
the mariner at seeing once again his home — land, and being at last 
free from the dread mysterious horrors of the sea. 

Throughout the entire poem we find the thought of sympathy of 
ISTature with man — the same thought which is beautifully expressed in 
Bryant's lines: 

"To him who in the love of nature holds 
Communion with her visible forms she speaks 
A various language. For his gayer hours, 
She has a voice of gladness and a smile, 
And eloquence of beauty, and she glides 
Into his darker musings with a mild 
And healing sympathy that steals away 
Their sharpness ere he is aware." 

Closely related to the use of sound is the use of color. This har- 
monizes with the frame of mind of the mariner, and makes the scenes 
much more vivid than they would otherwise be. Also we have the 
little bits of description of the wedding feast, which abound in color, 

such as: 

"The bride hath paced into the hall, 
Red as a rose is she." 

Surely we do not need more to picture the blushing bride. But by 
far the greater part of these expressions are used to show the relation 
between the mariner's feelings and his surroundings. 

In the description of the South Polar regions we have the word white, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 117 

or its equivalent, used very frequently. Such expressions as "the 
snowy cliffs," a the fog-smoke white" and "the white moonshine" im- 
press us very forcibly with the extreme coldness of the region. In the 
description of the ''Nightmare Life in Death," we have a combination 
of colors which is often used to describe a beautiful woman ; but the 
words "white as leprosy" carry with them a loathsome idea which makes 
the picture anything else than but beautiful. There is a striking use 
of color in the account of the way in which the mariner looked upon 
the creatures of the calm after he felt love for all living things spring 
up in his heart : 

"Beyond the shadow of the ship, 
I watched the water-snakes, 

They moved in tracks of shining white, 

And when they reared, the elfish light 
Fell off in hoary flakes. 

"Within the shadow of the ship 
I watched their rich attire. 
Blue, glossy green, and velvet black, 
They coiled and swam; and every track 
Was a flash of golden fire." 

How much more effective is this description of the difference in their 

appearance than would be a mere statement that there was a difference ! 

"When the mariner is alone and in the depths of despair, 

"The charmed water burns alway 
A still and awful red." 

But after he has blessed the creatures of the calm, he "views the ocean 
green." The account of the mariner's return is indeed beautiful ; the 
scene is one of calm and peace, and with the disappearance of the crim- 
son light from the spirits who are leaving the dead bodies, the last bit 
of supernatural color is gone ; there is left only the natural world sleep- 
ing peacefully beneath the silver moon. 

The use of sound in the "Ancient Mariner" is by no means its least 
striking characteristic. Its use is similar to that of light and color. 
In the beginning of the tale, the sounds are cheerful and have a merry 

ring, as — 

"The ship was cheered, the harbor cleared." 

But with the approach to the mysterious South Polar regions, fearful 
sounds are heard : 



118 The St. Mary's Muse. 

"It cracked and growled, and roared and howled 
Like noises in a swound." 

In the stanza : 

"Alone, alone, all, all alone, 
Alone on a wide, wide sea!" 

we have a succession of long vowels which give us better than anything 
else could do, an impression of the utter loneliness of the mariner. 
The noises correspond to the scenes. As the suffering of the mariner 
grows more horrible, so do the sounds, until the climax is reached, when 
the silence of the sea becomes more terrible than the most fearful noises. 
Following close upon this is the music of the angelic spirits, whose sweet 
tones bring the mariner from the depths of suffering almost to the gates 
of Heaven. 

Then, at the close, after so great a number of dread sounds, we have 
the welcoming call of the little vesper bell, and the tale of horror ends 
in a scene of peace. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Alice Leigh Hines, Rebe Hill Shields, Editors. 



Hallowe'en. 

Perhaps the Hallowe'en merrymaking of 1908 was not an event of 
moment to all present, but to some of those taking part for the first 
time it was an occasion of anticipation and lively enjoyment. From 
the first planning for the costumes and engaging of partners our in- 
terest and excitement increased. Borrowing and lending articles for 
the make-ups only added to the interest and good fellowship, and ex- 
tremity developed resourcefulness. It was amusing to hear some one 
ask a friend if she had any more silver buckles to lend when the silver 
buckles were cut from Nabisco boxes. 

The culmination of the mystery and excitement came as the long line 
of masqueraders entered the parlor, and marched grandly around the 
big room. Autumn leaves and growing plants and the old paintings 
looked down on the bright company's tiny candles and the dim light 
from Jack-o-lanterns lighted the scene ; and the spectators, from their 
seats around the sides of the room, tried to penetrate the disguises. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 119 

The Gypsy queen marched with a dainty colonial lady as companion 
to her gorgeous state ; a West Point cadet had chosen a Swiss peasant 
as his partner; a Chinaman escorted "Little Red-Riding Hood." In 
the line was a white satin train long enough to gain admission to the 
court of King Edward himself, but what torture to the Southern belle 
who stepped forward and then back again lest she tear the sheeny gown 
of the lady who walked in front. The trained nurse, lovely in her cool 
dress and white cap, could not for all her science suppress a shriek at 
the tall and silent ghost who stalked behind her. With several com- 
panions, like him except that they did not approach his amazing height, 
he mingled with the masqueraders and chased those who fled away in 
feigned or real terror. Had we only known his identity before he re- 
turned to his narrow grave! He should never have escaped without 
invitations to dance. 

Gradually the lights burned brighter, the music ceased, and we were 
ready to greet teachers and friends and to find how successful the dis- 
guises were. The identity of few seemed to escape our Rector. A 
couple approached him. 

"I have just had the pleasure of meeting your mother," he said to 
one ; and they passed on to see if others had equally penetrating eyes. 

The dancing followed. In the full light we met and made engage- 
ments with many whom we never dreamed lived at "St. Mary's," — 
Pocahontas and a Spanish girl and a lady clad in silk, who might have 
stepped out of one of Du Maurier's society sketches. There were a 
number of darkies, — black mammies and dark-skinned beaus. In the 
crowd no grace was possible, and our engagements became very con- 
fused. Perhaps another year regular dances might be arranged with 
shorter intervals between, and then we would not approach a friend to 
find that our promised dance was passed and her engagements made 
for some time ahead. Yet we enjoyed the dancing, and the faculty's 
thought of us in giving us refreshments was especially appreciated. 
These we ate sitting in sociable little groups on the floor. 

This did not long precede the hour of parting. Before we had seen 

half the costumes or danced with half the girls we wished, the big bell 

rang. The masqueraders trooped to bed, and on the morrow it was a 

crowd of school girls who assembled for church. The fantastic charac- 

3 



120 The St. Maky's Muse. 



ters had retired into the girls' imaginations, whence they had come out. 

One thought suggested itself. It was that not all the girls of this day 

can be said to have degenerated from what their grandmothers used to 

be. Those grandmothers in their young days could not have been more 

demure and sweet, nor could they have had a lovelier dignity than some 

of our "St. Mary's" girls w T ho came as Southern belles of ante-bellum 

fame. 

Archdeacon Webber. 

On Tuesday, November 3, the teachers and girls of the school had 
the unexpected pleasure and privilege of hearing Archdeacon Webber 
at the evening Chapel service. He gave us an earnest and helpful talk 
on "How to Obtain Happiness." The four main thoughts which he 
pointed out as means to this end were: the necessity of having a fixed 
purpose in life; the realization of our responsibility, — that our influ- 
ence is great in proportion to our reputation, and the remembrance of 
the fact that each one of us will have to account to God for the use of 
his talents ; the practice of graciousness and unselfish kindness ^oward 
every one; and the helpfulness of making true friends, and especially 
of cherishing the friendship of the truest and greatest of all friends — 
Jesus Christ. Mr. Webber is a wonderful speaker, and his earnest, 
forceful manner deeply impressed his hearers. 

The next evening a large number of us attended the service at 
Christ Church,, where the Archdeacon was holding a mission. There 
we had the pleasure of hearing him speak a second time, his subject 
then being the "Passion Play," which he has himself seen. In beau- 
tiful and graphic language he described the little village of Ober-Am- 
mergau, and the tableaux of the play enacted there by the simple- 
hearted peasant folk. Vividly he pictured the dramatic, soul-inspiring 
scenes, drawing from each a lesson which with great power and earnest- 
ness he drove home to the hearts of his listeners. P. E. H. 

In the Music Department. 

The Music Department, beginning its first year with Miss Dowd as 
Director, shows much vigor and promise. The department is also en- 
riched by the return of Miss Hull and Miss Pixley, who are heartily 
welcomed by all of Raleigh. Miss Hull has again taken the leadership 



The St. Mary's Muse. 121 

of the St. Mary's orchestra, which includes Miss Limey as one of its 
new members. 

Two faculty recitals have already been given this year : the first held 
in the auditorium, in which all the members of the Music Faculty took 
part ; the second, an organ recital by Miss Luney, assisted by Miss Hull 
and Miss Gould, was held in the chapel. Both of these recitals were 
artistic and finished, and were warmly appreciated. Programs of them 
are printed elsewhere in this issue. The next public recital is to be 
given by Miss Hull and Miss Pixley. 

The pupils' recitals are conducted differently this year, and the re- 
sults are very encouraging. Every other Thursday afternoon informal 
recitals are held in the auditorium, attended by the music pupils and 
others who care to go. The programs of the first two of these recitals 

follow : 

STUDENTS RECITAL— November 5, 1908. 

Album Leaf Kerchner 

Henrietta Schwartz. 

Study Concone 

Lucia Yates. 

Song without words Mendelssohn 

Amelia Whitaker. 

Serenade Jensen 

Margaret Pennington. 

Barcarolle Godard 

Frankie Self. 
Valse Arabesque Laeh 

E STEELE EGERTON. 

STUDENTS RECITAL— November 19, 1908. 

Study Heller 

Scherzo Kullak 

Joanna Rogers. 

My love's an Arbutus M. V. White 

Jessie Wood all. 

Morceux Melodieux — ( for two pianos ) Gulitt 

Gladys Hill and Miss Luney. 

When Love is Done Lynes 

Marie Thomas. 
Reverie — ( Violin ) . 

Margaret Erwin, accompanied by Bessie Erwin. 

Shepherds and Shepherdesses Godard 

Eleanor Mann. 



122 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Study Concone 

Pomponette Durand 

Vernon Holloway 

Barcarolle Ema 

August Davine. 
Japanese Love Song. 

Delmar Burbank. 

La Filieuse Baff 

Bebe Shields. 

Public recitals by the music pupils have not been given, but is 
planned to have them regularly and frequently later in the winter. 

The choir has more regular work now than in many years. Friday 
evenings there is practice by the choir and Saturday a practice in 
chapel of hymns and chants by the whole school. 

Choral work has also been revived this year, and the chorus class, 
composed of the choir and a large number of the other girls, meets every 
other evening for sight singing of both secular and sacred music. The 
chorus class has not yet appeared publicly, but we are promised and 
early hearing, and also an entertainment by the Glee Club, which is an 
offshoot of the Choral Club. 

Second Faculty Concert. 

Toccata and Fugue in D minor . - Bach 

Miss Bertha M. Luney. 

Jesu, Jesu Miserere Nevin 

Miss Sara Gould. 

In Summer Stebbins 

Miss Bertha M. Luney. 

Adagio Pathetique Godard 

Miss Charlotte Kendall Hull. 

Toccata Dubois. 

Miss Bertha M. Luney. 

The Plains of Peace Barnard 

Miss Sara Gould. 

a Berceuse Harry Bowe Shelley 

b Sortie in D minor Eogers 

Miss Bertha M. Luney. 

Traumerei Schumann 

Miss Charlotte Kendall Hull. 

a Offertory Salome 

b Postlude Stern 

Miss Bertha M. Luney. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 123 

From the News and Observer: 

The faculty recital at St. Mary's last night was a concert of unusual interest 
and excellence, heard and thoroughly enjoyed by nearly all the music lovers in 
Raleigh. The programme was varied and well arranged, and the character of the 
performance promises a good season of music at St. Mary's. 

Miss Martha A. Dowd, pianist, now director of the music school, opened the con- 
cert with Prudent's "Reveil des Fees, op. 41." This number, well performed, was 
followed by two vocal numbers, sung by Miss Sara Gould, mezzo-soprano: Wick- 
ede's "Hearts' Springtime," and Liza Lehmann's "If no one Ever Marries Me," an 
attractive bit of childrens music which the audience thoroughly enjoyed. 

Miss Charlotte Hull, violinist, came next with two movements from Wieniawski's 
Concerto op. 22, No. 2," the Romance (Andante), and the Allegro Moderate Miss 
Hull is one of the leading artists of North Carolina. She has a free and brilliant 
technique, pure and unhesitating intonation, and a style both poetic, warm and 
powerful. Miss Hull managed the most difficult passages in the concerto in the 
most perfect style, every note distinct, and every tone perfect. She took the 
audience by storm. Miss Hull was followed by Miss Hermine Scheper, a very 
capable pianist, who played the Liszt "Liebestranne" No. 3 and another Liszt 
number. Miss Scheper's tone is remarkable for its singing quality, being not unlike 
that of a string instrument. 

A pleasant bit of variety was furnished by Miss Cribb's reading a scene from 
"The Spanish Gipsy." It was a difficult piece of drama thoroughly well rendered. 
The next number was Liszt's "Sonette 123 de Petrarch," played by Miss Chelian 
Pixley, pianist, who comes from Europe with a more musician-like style than ever, 
clear-cut without mere technique, refined without coldness, powerful without any 
lack of delicacy or brilliancy. Miss Pixley's second number was the great Liszt 
Polonaise in E major, an exceedingly difficult number, played magnificently. Miss 
Pixley's pedal work was particularly noticed by pianists who heard her. The 
concert ended with three numbers sung by Miss Sara Gould: Harris' Madrigal, 
Rogers' "At Parting," and Gaynor's "Jerusha," a humorous song which won hearty 
applause. Miss Gould's accompaniments were very satisfactorily played by Miss 
Bertha M. Luney. 

Reappearance of Miss Hull and the Orchestra. 

On the evening of December 11th, the third of this session's series of 
Faculty Recitals was given in the auditorium to a good audience. 

This recital was a "Concert of Chamber Music," assisted by the St. 
Mary's Orchestra, both under the direction of Miss Hull. 

The orchestra made quite a reputation in 1904-06, and there was 
much regret at its suspension last season during the absence of Miss 
Hull abroad. On her return this fall she at once reorganized the 
orchestra, which now has eighteen members, and this was the first of a 
series of appearances it will make during the year. 



124 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Shortly after the holidays the Fourth Faculty Recital will be given 
by Miss Hull, Violinist, and Miss Pixley, Pianist — and it is awaited 
with great eagerness. 

The program of the third concert was as follows : 

Dream Waltz from Ninetta Strauss 

Quartette in G ( Violin, Cello, Piano ) Pergolesi 

1. Moderate. 2. Andantino. 3. Fugato-Presto. 

String Quartette, op. 58, No. 3 Dr. W. Volckmar 

1. Moderate 2. Allegretto. 3. Adagio. 4. Allegro-Molto. 

Trio, op. 59, No. 2 (Piano, Violin, Cello) Reinecke 

1. Allegro Molto. Andantino. 3. Finale Allegretto. 

Suite Romantique Nevin 

1. A Day in Venice. 2. Dawn. 3. Gondoliers. 4. Love Song. 5. Good-night. 

Says the News and Observer: 

The attractive program of chamber music given last night in St. Mary's Audi- 
torium was greatly enjoyed by a sympathetic and intelligent audience. 

The Pergolesi quartette, played by Miss Hull, first violin; Mr. James Thomas, 
second violin; Miss Luney, cello, and Miss Pixley, piano, was given with well- 
balanced tone and a keen appreciation of this quaint and interesting work. The 
sustained harmonies of the second movement were specially pleasing. 

The string quartette, by Volckmar, played by Miss Hull, first violin; Mr. Thomas, 
second violin; Mr. Royster, viola; Miss Luney, cello, makes one wish the works of 
this comparatively unfamiliar writer were more often heard. The melodies are 
original and spontaneous, and the unexpected change of tempo to vivace, in the first 
movement is most effective. The allegro molto is full of spirit and deserves to be 
heard more often. 

The Reinecke trio, played by Miss Pixley, piano; Miss Hull, violin, and Dr. George 
Summey, Jr., cello showed the intellect and refinement which characterize this com- 
poser, the melody of the andantino being particularly attractive. 

This concert included also the reappearance of St. Mary's Orchestra, which Miss 
Hull, after a year's absence, again conducted. The pleasing concerts of this organi- 
zation were missed last year, and a large crowd of friends heartily welcomed her 
and her orchestra. 

The dainty Strauss waltz opened the program with rhythm and pleasing melody. 
The beautiful Nevin Suite gave scope for varied interpretation, every number being 
a gem in itself. The tone was steady and firm, the crescendos effective and the 
ensemble was good. 

The Rose Maiden. 

On the evening of December third, the Choral Society of Raleigh, 
Mr. Wade Brown, Conductor, in the auditorium of the Baptist Uni- 
versity for Women, rendered Cowen's Cantata — "The Rose Maiden." 

Through the special courtesy of the Conductor this event was in- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 125 

eluded in our regular musical program for the year, and a large part 
of the St. Mary's student body was in attendance, and thoroughly en- 
joyed the evening. 

Social Life of the Class of 1909. 

A very pleasant feature of the social life of the fall and a graceful 
indication of the cordial relations existing between St. Mary's and hei 
sister schools in Raleigh is seen in the receptions given by the Senior 
Classes of the Baptist University and of Peace Institute to the Senior 
Classes of their two sister schools. 

The occasion at the Baptist University was the dramatic recital of 
Bulwer Lytton's "Richelieu," given by Dean Henry Lawrence South- 
wick, of the Emerson School of Oratory, Boston, on the evening of, 
November 23d. The Seniors of Peace and St. Mary's were the guests 
of the Seniors of the University for the recital, and afterwards at a 
short reception in the parlors, at which the guests had the pleasure of 
meeting Mr. Southwick. Hot chocolate and wafers were served. 

There were present Misses Way, Stockard, Sloan, Moore, Penny, 
Walker and Hinkle, of Peace, with Miss Aunspaugh ; while Sallie Hay- 
wood Battle, Georgia Hales, Minnie Leary, Julia Mclntyre, Eva Rog- 
erson and Frankie Self, the class of 1908, of St. Mary's, .attended with 
Miss Thomas. The Baptist University Seniors are Misses Lawrence, 
Poteat, Britt, Hilliard, Hayes, Howard, Williams, Betts, Hale, Cox. 
Marshall, Staples, Rogers and Futrell. 

On November 29th the Seniors of St. Mary's and B. U. W. were the 
guests of the Seniors of Peace, the occasion being the lecture of Dr. 
Jas. I. Royster, of the University of North Carolina, on "Aptitudes 
Toward Literature." A short reception followed the lecture. Our 
Seniors were accompanied by Miss Margaret Jones. 

Both occasions were very pleasant, and the members of the St. Mary's 
Class of 1909 look forward with much pleasure to reciprocating the 
attention after the holidays. 

In addition to these two inter-school gatherings, on Monday, Novem- 
ber 16th, the class was very prettily entertained at luncheon by Mr. 
and Mrs. Stone at their home on Boylan Avenue. The intimate ac- 
quaintance with Mr. Stone in the classroom made the occasion even 
more delightful. 



126 The St. Mart's Muse. 

On Saturday evening, December the fifth, St. Catherine's Chapter 
of the Junior Auxiliary appeared in the attractive comedy, "Men. 
Maids, and Matchmakers." The stage was prettily decorated with pen- 
nants, pictures, etc., to represent the New York plot of the bachelor 
girls. The plot was just the kind to appeal to a schoolgirl's heart, and 
many a sigh of relief was heaved when, in the last scene, the lovers' 
quarrels were smoothed out and all were made happy, even Dr. Imhoff's 
devotion finding its reward in "Samrnie." The parts were very well 
assigned, each girl's role seeming to fit her exactly. Passie May Ottley 
was especially good as Dr. Imhoff, while Mary Shuford proved a very 
successful instructor in the act of love-making, and Sallie Haywood 
Battle a very apt pupil. 

The cast was as follows : 

Bachelor Maids. 

Lillian Steward Miss Ida Rogerson 

Katherine Howard Miss Mary Shuford 

Elizabeth Everitt Miss Annie Wood 

Alice Marshall, alias Aunt Selina Winthrop Miss Paula Hazard 

Bachelor Men. 

Guy Richards Miss Minnie Leary 

Charles Brewster Miss Georgia Hales 

Roy Vincent Miss Sallie Haywood Battle 

Dr. Imnhoff Miss Passie May Ottley 

Sammie ( a cat ) . 

Entertainment at the Rectory. 

On November 24th Mrs. Lay gave a very novel and enjoyable party 
to the Faculty. All were asked to bring a gift of the "kind that you'd 
rather give than receive." So all appeared with choice offerings, which 
included tomato cans, ancient hats, and half-clothed umbrellas. The 
gifts were opened after they had been impartially distributed among 
the guests. 

Later on, a drawing contest was held, the company being paired off, 
and the pairs drew each other's portraits. The results were most as- 
tonishing. A prize was given to the one who could recognize the great- 
est number of likenesses, and also a prize for the best, and one for the 
worst drawing were given. Delicious refreshments were served at the 
close of the evening. 



p 
The St. Mary's Muse. 127 



School Notes. 



— Laura Meares, Meta Mewborn and Bessie and Margaret Erwin 
have been fortunate enough to have short visits from their fathers 
during the month. 

— About the middle of November Mrs. Dorrah came to see her 
daughter, Ella, who was very ill. She took her to a hospital in Green- 
ville, S. C. Both the mother and daughter have our sincerest sym- 
pathy, and we hope that the latter will be so much benefited that she 
may soon be able to be with us again. 

— Rev. Mr. Barber, of Christ Church, gave us a very interesting and 
helpful talk in the afternoon service on the twenty-second Sunday after 
Trinity. 

— Maude Grice, of Elizabeth City, came by St. Mary's on her way 
to Chapel Hill for the November dances. 

— Mr. Lay attended conventions in Tarboro and Charlotte during 
the month. 

— Lucy Dortch enjoyed seeing her father and two little sisters in 
November. 

— Martha Byrd Spruill went home several days ago for her sister 
Alice's wedding. 

— Kathleen Matthews, from Hollins, has lately spent several days at 
St. Mary's. 

— The big "Thanksgiving basketball game" will be on the afternoon 
before Thanksgiving day. 

— Mr. Cruikshank attended the Library Convention in Greensboro. 

— St. Mary's welcomed many of her "old girls" during November. 
Betsey Dixon and Sadie Thomas stopped at St. Mary's on their way 
from Chapel Hill, where they had attended the November dances. 
Elizabeth Smith came up from the Southern Conservatory of Music, at 
Durham, for several days. Marguerite Lebrun made us a short visit 
on her way from Kathrine Anderson's wedding. Meta Boykin was 
also here at the same time. Marion Slocomb was here several days 
with her sister, Helen. Sue Prince, who was visiting Josephine Boy- 



128 The St. Maky's Muse. 

Ian, came over to the school quite often. Mary Spruill, who is teaching 
in Youngsville, was with us from Saturday until Monday. 

— Byrd Henderson went home for her sister, Katherine's wedding. 

— Dr. and Mrs. Thurman Kitchin, nee Reba Clark, passed through 
Raleigh on their wedding trip. 

— The old girls were delighted with a short visit from Mr. DuBose 
this month. The service that he held in the chapel brought back the 
"old times" to a great many of us. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1908-'09. 
Mary Campbell Shuford, Editor in Chief. 
Ida Jean Rogerson, Business Manager. 

ffiS } »■*■ Edit0 - LenT Ev?™, D ' } ^erary Editors. 

Paula Hazard, Associate Editor. Annie C. Wood, Associate Editor. 

Laura Meares, Exchange Editor. 

Frances Bottum, Assistant Business Manager. 

EDITORIAL. 
Christmas. 



Christmas at last ! From the very first day that school opened every 
girl has been counting the months — then as time grew less, the days — 
which finally dwindled into hours, until the very last little minute, be- 
fore the holidays, is in the past — the long-looked for time is here, and 
we are speeding just as fast as steam and rail can carry us — Home ! 
Now to a school girl what does Christmas mean? To St. Mary's girls 
what is the spirit of this festival of the Christian church ? I am afraid 
that the anticipated pleasure leaves no room in our minds for other 
thoughts. What can surpass the joy of sleeping just as late as you 
please in the morning; of having nothing whatever to do all day long; 
of enjoying good things to eat at all hours; of being with the ones you 
love most once more, and of having every single minute filled up to the 
brim and running over with pleasure and gayety and frolic? Home 
and Christmas ! What a picture those two words paint for us. 

But if we stop just for a moment for more serious consideration, a 
higher, finer thought might come into our minds. Christmas ought not 
to mean so much your pleasure as the pleasure of others — not so much 
the joy which you have as the joy which you give to others. For we 



130 The St. Mary's Muse. 



must not forget that Christmas is the yearly symbol of the Christian 
spirit of generosity and love ; and the true spirit of Christmas is "Peace 
on earth, good will toward men." 



Another Christmas Thought. 



I do not suppose there is any time of the year which means quite as 
much to school girls as the Christmas vacation. We have been away 
from home just long enough to realize that there is no place quite like 
it, still school life has not lost its novelty. We go home and plunge 
into the midst of gayety and festivities, which fill up the time so that 
the time for returning comes before we realize it. 

Then, girls, please remember this : Enjoy yourself to the utmost, but 
when the time comes for school to take in, come back without a single 
regret or bad feeling. You wouldn't enjoy your holidays if you had 
them all the time. 

The work here is so much easier and better if you realize what a 
nice place school is while you are there and not wait until after you 
leave to do so. So here's hoping for a merry Christmas at home and 
the return to a happy ISTew Year at St. Mary's. 



New Buildings for St. Mary's. 



The Muse is pleased to be able to announce that new buildings are 
to be erected in the immediate future. 

The Trustees, at a recent meeting, voted to use the legacy of the late 
Miss Clement, amounting to nearly thirty thousand dollars, for this 
purpose; and to raise sufficient funds in addition to carry out their 
present plan. 

First of all, there is a comprehensive scheme for future development 
that will enable the buildings to be uniform and harmonious in style, 
even though the School should grow to be several times larger. This 
plan, in brief, is to build new wings on the east and west of the main 
building and then later to build north from either ends of these wings, 
and later still to turn east from the eastern addition and west from the 
western addition. This will form a sort of court north, and in the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 131 

rear, of the main building. On the north side of this space, at a dis- 
tance of about one hundred and twenty feet from the main building, 
it is planned to erect a separate building to contain a gymnasium in 
the basement, which will practically be above ground, and a dining 
room and kitchen on the main floor. This buildiug is also to be erected 
at once and is to be called Clement Hall, in memory of Miss Clement, 
who gave the legacy, and of her mother, Madame Clement, who was 
teacher of French at St. Mary's in the early days. 

The two wings mentioned will accommodate fifty-six pupils in rooms 
for two and four teachers in single rooms, besides having eight class 
rooms. 

At the same time it is planned to remodel the inside of the main 
building somewhat and to improve the porch in front. 

It is probable that the space left vacant in the present basement wi]l 
make it possible to provide a large room for the day pupils, with table 
for lunch and lockers for hats, wraps and books. 

In general these plans preserve intact the old buildings, where the 
Tounder lived and worked, and in which all the older St. Mary's girls 
lived; while there will be added to these modern buildings accommo- 
dating more pupils and offering better facilities for the work of the St* 
Mary's girls of the future. 

It is hoped that the Muse will be able soon to print pictures and 
plans of the proposed buildings. 

Meanwhile, we shall all be glad to look forward to seeing these new 
and much-needed buildings when the School opens next fall. 



With the Exchanges. 



The Muse acknowledges with thanks the receipt of the following 
November exchanges : Carolinian,, Chatterbox, Chimes, College of 
Charleston Magazine, College Message, Concept, Emory and Henry 
Era, Grenadian, Guilford Collegian, Hollins Quarterly, Horce Scholas- 
ticce, Lenoirian, Maryland Collegian, Messenger, Millsaps Collegian, 
Oracle of Woodberry Forest, Oracle of Duval High School, Palmetto, 
Pine and Thistle, Quill, Radiant, Bed and White, Talisman, Univer- 
sity of N. C. Magazine, Wake Forest Student, Wnithrop College 
Journal. 



132 The St. Mary's Muse. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN. 



In 1ST. English — "What do sailors call the northeast wind ?" 
I. R. (eagerly) — "A nor' wester!" 



O ! little boy, I pity you, 
And not without a reason, 

The garden is no comfort now, 
For worms are out of season. 



What's in a Name. 
I know a man whose face is long, 
He never laughs or sings a song — 
His name is Hope. 

I know a man so grum and cross 
For happiness he's at a loss — 
His name is Smiles. 

I know a man who couldn't tell 
What year it was that Carthage fell — 
His name is Wise. 

I know a man who mops his brow 
And says, "Good Lord, it's sizzling now!" — 
His name is Snow. 

I know a man who's always blue, 
No matter what he tries to do — 
His name is Brown. 

I know a man who vows that he 
Will never, never happy be — 
His name is Bliss. 

I know a man who's very high 
And people praise him passing by — 
His name is Lowe. 

I know a man who drags his feet 
And seems too blooming tired to eat — 
His name is Swift. — Birmingham Age-Herald. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



133 



Pass it On. 
The College President: 
Such rawness in a student is a shame, 
But lack of preparation is to blame. 

The High School Principal: 
Good heavens ! What crudity ! The boy's a fool. 
The fault, of course, is with the grammar school. 

The Grammar School Principal: 
Would that from such a dunce I might be spared ! 
They send them up to me so unprepared. 

The Primary Principal: 
Poor kindergarten blockhead! And they call 
That "preparation!" Worse than none at all. 

The Kindergarten Teacher: 
Never such lack of training did I see, 
What kind of person can the mother be? 

The Mother: 
You stupid child ! But then you're not to blame. 
Your father's family are all the same. 

The Philosopher: 
Shall father in his folks' defense be heard? 
No! Let the mother have the final word. 



—Puck. 



Lithpth. 

Thuthie and Thaddie and Thethelia were thitterth ! Thuthie wath 
thad and thober. Thaddie wath theerful and thmiling. Her thitherth 
thought the wath thilly. 

And one day Thethelia wath walking home from thurth with Tham- 
uel Thimpthon, and Thuthie and Thaddie were thitting on the fenth 
thwinging their thlipperth. 

Then Thuthie and Thaddie thaid, "Oh, Thethelia, why do you thmile 
tho thilly!" 

But Thethelia kept on walking with Thamuel Thimpthon, and Thu- 
thie and Thaddie are thill thitting on the fenth. — The Tattler. 



134 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Football. 

Sing a song of football, 

Don't it make you smile? 
Two and twenty players 

Struggling in a pile; 
When the pile is opened, 

Hear those awful groans; 
Boys begin to creep out, 

Looking for their bones. 
Sections there of noses, 

Patches here of hair, 
But they made a touchdown, 

And little do they care. — Ex. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ckuikshank - - - - Aluninse Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

IMrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Mrs. I. M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 
Mrs. F. P. Tucker, Raleigh, 
Mrs.Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 

EDITORIAL. 



The Clement Legacy. 



In the November number of the Muse it was announced that the 
matter of the disposition of the Clement legacy of thirty thousand 
dollars was undecided. At the last meeting of the Trustees it was 
decided to use this money for much-needed enlargement and improve- 
ment of the School buildings at St. Mary's. This work will be begun 
early in the new year, and the aim is to have the work completed by 
September. We are sure of the interest in and approval of the Alumnse 
of this use of the funds. Elsewhere in this issue details of the changes 
and additions are given. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



Mr. Chas. H- Belvin. 

1843-1908. 

Mr. Belvin was one of Ealeigh's first citizens, and was so a part of 
Raleigh's life and financial activity that it is not our place to give a 
sketch of his life or to speak further of his high character and honor, 
than has already been done by the State papers. We wish to honor 
him as the friend of St. Mary's. Although belonging to another church, 
Mr. Belvin's belief in St. Mary's was steady and powerful, and he 



136 The St. Mary's Muse. 



could always be counted on for support and sympathy in the progress 
of the School. 

His youngest daughter, Miss Nannie, was a student of St. Mary's — 
graduated in 1899. She was afterwards assistant in English for ?, 
short time — until her health failed. She died in 1904. One of the 
stained glass windows in the Chapel was given by Mr. and Mrs. Belvirj 
in memory of this well-loved daughter. 



We are sorry to hear the news of the drowning in the early part of 
December while out skating at her home in Egerton, Wis., of Violet 
Bliven. She was for several years a pupil in the Primary School until 
her removal from Raleigh in 1907, and in the days of her friendship 
for Rainsford DuBose she and her pony were very familiar figures about 
the grove. 



Alumnae Weddings. 



DALTON-SKINNER. 

Invitations have been issued which read: 

Mr. Benjamin Smith Skinner 

will give in marriage his daughter 

Rosa Fries 

to 

Mr. Henry Hedley Dalton 

on the morning of Wednesday, November eighteenth 

at ten o'clock 

128 New Bern Avenue 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



GUERARD-GASKLLL NUPTIALS. 



Tarboro, N. C, November 21. — Calvary Episcopal Church was the 
scene of a pretty wedding Wednesday night at 8 o'clock, when Miss 
Olive Freeman Gaskill plighted her troth to Mr. Marion Godwin 



The St. Mary's Muse. 137 

Guerard, Asheville, amid the most beautiful ceremony ever held in this 
famous sanctuary. The popularity of the young couple was attested 
by the large throng which assembled in Calvary Church during the hour 
preceding the event. 

The vows were pronounced by Rev. F. H. Harding, and during the 
ceremony Miss Sue Curtis rendered the "Sweetest Story Ever Told," 
with violin obligato by P. L. McCabe. 

The bride is the eldest daughter of James E. Gaskill and is one of 
the most graceful, vivacious and charming of Tarboro's young daugh- 
ters. She is popular throughout the State and has a wide circle of 
friends who will wish her the best that life holds in store for us. 

The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Elliott Guerard, of 
Asheville, and a descendant of Benjamin Guerard, the first Governor 
of South Carolina. He holds a responsible position with the Southern 
Railway and is an unusually clever man. 

Mr. and Mrs. Guerard left for Rocky Mount by automobile 
Wednesday night, from which place they went on a tour to Northern 
cities. They will be at home in Asheville after December 15th. 



ANDERSON-FORT. 

Miss Katharine Wilder Fort, of Raleigh, was married on the morn- 
ing of December 2d to Mr. Parker Richardson Anderson, of Washing- 
ton, D. C. The ceremony was performed at the home of the bride by 
Rev. Dr. Pittenger, of the Church of the Good Shepherd. 

Though "Katie Fort" is well remembered by her St. Mary's school- 
mates, her maid of honor — her sister, Nellie Fort — is better known to 
the present day student. 

Mr. Anderson is on the staff of the Washington Times, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Anderson will make their home at the Dewey Hotel, Washington. 



JOSLIN-HIXSDALE. 

Col. and Mrs. John Wetmore Hinsdale 

request the honour of 

your presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Annie Devereux 

to 



138 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Mr. Harold Vincent Joslin 

on Wednesday morning, the second day of December 

nineteen hundred and eight 

at half after eleven o'clock 

Christ Church 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Rev. Milton Barber, Rector of Christ Church, officiated at the wed- 
ding, and Miss Nell Hinsdale, sister of the bride, was maid of honor. 

All of the "Hinsdale girls" spent their school days at St. Mary's, 
and the wedding of Miss Annie is a matter of much interest. 

Mr. Joslin is a civil engineer with the N. & S. R. R., at present 
located in Norfolk, and since away from his Northern home has made 
many friends in the South. 



HAMILTON-THOMPSON. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Augustus Thompson 

request the honour of 

your presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Mary Cornelia 

to 

Mr. Joseph Gregoire de Roulhac Hamilton 

on the evening of Tuesday, the twenty-second of December 

at six o'clock 

Christ Church 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

"Mary Thompson" has been one of the most popular of the daughters 
of St. Mary's, both in her school days and since. She graduated in 
1900 and afterwards completed the Business Course. 

Mr. Hamilton, of the Hillsboro Hamiltons, is connected with St 
Mary's, though many of his family who have been educated here, in- 
cluding his sister, Miss Lillie R. Hamilton. He is instructor in Eng- 
lish at Chapel Hill. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 139 

cathcart-sloan. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Trimmier Sloan 

request the honour of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Annie Whitner 

to 

Mr. James Armstrong Cathcart 

on the evening of Wednesday, the second of December 

one thousand nine hundred and eight 

at half after eight o'clock 

Trinity Church 
Columbia, South Carolina 

"Annie Sloan" is the second of the girls of the Class of 1906 to 
undertake matrimony — the first having been Margaret Mackay, who 
became Mrs. George Jones last June. During the four years of her 
school life (1903-06) Miss Sloan made a deep impression on her school- 
mates, and she has many well-wishers still resident here. 

Two of her bridesmaids — "Ket" Ruff, of Eidgeway, S. C, and "May 
Hane," of Fort Motte — were old St. Mary's schoolmates, and two others 
— "Beatrice Cohen," '07, and "Jessie Jennings," of Florence, S. C, pre- 
sided at the punch tables. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cathcart will reside in Columbia. 

The Muse extends the hearty congratulations of St. Mary's. 



GREEX-SAIITH. 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Crittenden Smith 

request the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Ada Blanche 

to 

Mr. Joseph Smith Green 

on Saturday the nineteenth of December 

nineteen hundred and eight 

at five o'clock 
Kavenswood, West Virginia 



140 The St. Mart's Muse. 

Present day St. Mary's is very much interested in the foregoing an- 
nouncement. "Miss Smith" — a graduate of Smith, '04 — was for two 
sessions in charge of the Mathematics at St. Mary's, succeeding Miss 
Shipp in 1907 and resigning last spring. 

Her many friends here, both in the faculty and student body, wish 
her much happiness in her wedded life, and extend hearty congratula- 
tions to the fortunate Mr. Green. 



Notes of Interest to the Alumnae. 



Miss Esther Means, '04, who since her graduation has been living 
in Atlanta, is this winter in New York City, where, as she writes, she 
is "a small part of the machinery of Teachers' College, Columbia Uni- 
versity." * " * And her sister, Miss Caroline, also an old St. Mary's 
girl, who has for several years been living in ISTew York as governess in 
the Bowen family, and is now also connected with Teachers' College. 
Their address is 1230 Amsterdam Ave. (Whittier Hall). 

It was a great pleasure to have a brief visit this month from Mr. 
and Mrs. Isaac Avery, of Morganton. Mr. Avery was here to attend 
to some business in the Supreme Court, and Mrs. Avery (Margaret 
DuBose, '05) took the opportunity to revisit her many friends and th> 
familiar scenes and to introduce her husband to them. This was her 
first visit to St. Mary's since the removal of the DuBoses in July, '07 
when Mr. DuBose went to take up his new duties at Morganton. 



The Song of the Brool^. 



BY SARAH STONE WILLIAMS. 



Gurgling and splashing, 

Rippling and flashing, 
I laugh o'er the sands as I glide to the sea, 

Murmuring in shadow, 

Kissing the meadow 
With soft loving touch as the zephyrs kiss me: 



The St. Mary's Muse. 141 

Curling and sparkling, 

In cool eddies darkling 
Where tall graceful willows lay cheek on the tide; 

Where shy fish are darting, 

The lily-pads parting 
With swift anxious flash, watching while they hide; 

Thrushes are singing, 

With rapid flight winging, 
'Mid brown stately cat-tails where dragon-flies rest; 

Grasses are mossing, 

And butter-cups tossing, 
While I mirroor the sky in my untroubled breast. 

Away past the meadow, 

Undimned by a shadow, 
Far in the blue distance gleams brightly the sea; 

Thitherward trending, 

My course I am wending, 
Despite errant curves, to the goal given me. 

Life, too, is gliding, 

The Master Hand guiding, 
'Mid sunshine and shadow, the way that is best; 

Why, then, repining? 

The sun is still shining, 
And beyond lies the ocean of infinite rest. 



Edwards & Broughton Printing Company, Raleigh, N. C. 



REflD !— MflRK !— fiCT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



' It's worth the difference ' 



WHARTON & TYREE 



" Workers in Artistic Photography ' 



ST. MARY'S CALENDARS FOR 1909. 
As pretty as heretofore; we think prettier. 



~Ngw Ready. 



THE 



DOBBIN-FERRALL GO, 

Dry Goods 



OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILIiB AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



Smith = Tomst Co. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Society Monogram Papers, Visiting Cards and Stationery 

OF THE NICEST QUALITY AND LATEST STYLES AT 

ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO'S BOOKSTORE 

A Good Grade Fountain Pen at $1.00 



Raleigh and Southport Railway 

Short line between Raleigh and Fayetteville, 
Wilmington, Maxton, Red Springs, Bennettsville, 
Florence, Charleston, and all Atlantic Coast Line 
points. For information as to schedule and rates 
call on local agent, or write 

F. T. RICKS, 
Asst. General Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, H. W. JACKSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. T. DORTCH, Secretary. 



Traditions. 

Once there lived a Senior 
Who didn't pretend to know 

All knowledge worthy to be known- 
Ah! that was long ago! 



. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GrRQCBRS 

WILMINGTON <fe HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 

BANKING. 
All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof vault. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS. Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
t Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, $ 100,000.00 

Surplus, - - 100,000.00 

Deposits, - 1,175,000.00 

Assets, - 1,500,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Beown, Pres. H. E. Litchfoed, Cashier 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



Once there lived a Freshman 
Who studied night and day; 

Those ideal times when that boy lived 
Have long since passed away! 

Once there was a College Prof. 

Who worked himself to death; 
This class of Prof.'s became extinct 

With his last dying breath. — Ex. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


KING-CROWELX'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 


WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 


ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 


Dr. V. E. TURNER, 

Dentist. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 


GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C, 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



SAL V A TORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article, selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 


THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY. 

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW 

Ladies' Furnishings and Novelties. 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 


THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Candy— China. 

Pictures. Stationery. Toys, 


T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 
COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 







Their Favorites. 

Cakes for the farmer — hoe cakes. 

Cakes for the gossip — spice. 
Puffs for the advertiser, 

For the newly-married — rice. 

The cake for the grocer — pound cake. 

Angel cake for the good; 
Layer cake for the geologist, 

Johnny cake for the dude. 

Marble cake for the sculptor, 
Gems are the jeweler's joy; 

Batter cakes for the pugilist, 
And stomach cake for the boy. 



— Boston Transcript. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBBINS' LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

'PHONES 81. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 


J. SCHWARTZ, 
RICHMOND MARKET. 


H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds. 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 


Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBT. SIMPSON, ^E&KSSa etc. 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 


H. T. HICKS CO. 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, 1ST, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 
Francis P. Venable, Pres., Chapel Hill, N. C 



School Calendar, 1908-09. 



December- January. 

December 5, Saturday, 8 p. m. — St. Catherine's Chapter in "Men, Maids and 

Matchmakers." 
December 11, Friday, 8:30 p. m. — St. Mary's Orchestra Concert. 
December 17, Thursday, 8:30 p. m. — Muse Club Christmas Celebration. 
December 18, Friday — Christmas Holiday begins at 3:15 p. m. 
January 5, 1909, 7 p. m. — Christmas vacation ends. 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 


/^BROUGHTQI^} 
ff/PRl^TITHG COAl) 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 
Fayetteville Street. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pullen 
Pres. , Chas. Root, Cash'r. Capital and Surplus 
875,000. Four percent interest paid on deposits, 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Marts School, 



RALEIGH, N. C 



(for girls and young women). 



66th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 17, 1908. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 21, 1909. 



St. Mary's 

offers instruction in these 
Departments: 



THE COLLEGE. 

1HE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

7 HE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

THE AMI SCHOOL. 

7 HE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 190S-09 are enrolled 200 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New.- Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Stem way Grand Pianos. 

Sjjecial atteyition to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

RECTOR. 



flfcars's A.ii$e 



^ipbans flumber 




January, 1909 



^HH^H 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



EPIPHANY NUMBER. 



Vol. XIII. January, 1909. No. 5 



Epiphany. 



By high stars led, 
With great hopes sped, 

From East to West, 

On glorious quest 
The Wise Men tread ! 

Thro' desert sand, 
And alien land, 

Their star abides, 

And onward guides 
That Hope-drawn band! 

Nor fray, nor stay, 
Nor devious way, 

Can turn aside 

Their seeking wide, 
Befall what may! 

Beyond each bar, 
They follow far 

The beckoning gleam, 

The Heavenly beam, 
Their fair great Star! 

Until at last, 

The long way past, 

By stable door, 

O'er manger floor, 

Their star stays fast! 
******* 

With great light led, 
With rare gifts sped, 

Is this the end 

To which they wend! — 
A stable shed? 

Elleneen E. Checkley. 



144 The St. Mary's Muse. 



In the Firelight. 



VIRGINIA E. B. PICKEL. 



Have you felt the spell of that soft hour between daylight and dark, 
when the firelight glow falls like a benediction ? The day's cares melt 
away ; the late caller lingers ; voices fall, and hearts soften. The rosy 
flames play hide and seek with the faint shadows ; and they caress the 
fading light; and mingle and strive with the half darkness with all the 
eager joy of the lover's arms. It is a magic hour, but the enchantment 
falls away if a light is brought in. With a lamp or gas jet or electric 
bulb the world's anxieties return, and we are recalled from our fairy- 
land of peace and gladness. Old legend tells us why this is so, and the 
charm of the twilight finds its origin in shadowy myth. 

******* 

In the early days when the race was young and the world was full of 
poetry, a little sprite loved Twio, a fair maiden. He was a lively little 
elf, a subject of the Fairy Queen ; and it was his duty to paint the frosty 
leaves in gorgeous autumn. Fire, balancing on the swaying branches 
in his crimson jacket, was very different from his lovely sweetheart ; for 
she was pale and starry-eyed, and her dark hair fell mistily, veiling a 
slender form. Fire's greatest joy was when she walked in the fall sun- 
shine ; and he touched the trees with even ruddier glory for her eyes ; 
and whispered to her in the rustle of the leaves, Often the lovers' joy 
was interrupted by the rude tricks of a mischievous elf named Falso. 
He was an ill-tempered fellow; and had no special business, but was 
full of disconcerting wiles toward man and sprite. The Winds ru- 
mored that he also loved Twio, and was trying to discourage Fire in 
order to possess her for himself. Certainly he made Fire very un- 
happy, and often worked much harm; so that as the season advanced 
and the golden leaves turned brown, Fire began to think sadly that he 
must go away, and would not see his dear one for another year. His 
heart misgave him at what Falso might do in that time. With a heavy 
heart he went to Mother Nature, and told his tale. She listened kindly. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 145 



"You wished to be near my maiden," she said. "Very well, I grant 
you this. From henceforth rule over the dancing winter fires, and 
speak to her in the sighings and whisperings of the flames ; but know 
this, — no sprite can wed a mortal." 

Fire thanked her, and went to rule over his new dominion. He was 
so delighted at being near Twio that he forgot Mother Nature's last 
words, and he was particularly glad that Twio thought him even more 
charming than when he had flitted in Jack Frost's train. The colder 
the winds blew, the more constantly was Twio with him ; and he leaped 
up with gleeful content when he saw his old pensioners, the leaves, fall 
dead and brown near the window. 

It was Falso who made the trouble. His prying ears had heard 
Mother Nature's words, and in an ill moment he whispered them in 
Twio's ears. Then, not content with that, he also went to Mother 
Nature. 

"You made Fire ruler over a fair kingdom. Have you no kingdom 
for me ?" 

Mother Nature looked up. 

"Only a small one," she said, "and not of wide extent. You may 
rule in the sphere of artificial light, though it is little used by men of 
this day." 

Falso did not care for such humble powers, and took his departure 
crossly. On the way he was surprised to meet Twio. She carried 
something precious in her hand. 

"Where have you been ?" he asked. 

"To Fairyland," the maid replied, "and Titania has given me this 
beautiful veil. Whoever wears it shall become Evening's youngest 
daughter." 

She did not tell him that he had caused her journey ; that when he 
told her no mortal could wed a fay, her love and longing for Fire had 
grown so great that finally she went to Titania, and begged some fairy 
office. Twio did not tell the cunning elf this, but he guessed it and 
asked to see the cloudy scarf. It was too precious to part with, but she 
let him look at it in her hands, and said : 



146 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"Titania told me I must first ask Mother Nature about wearing it, 
for I am Mother Nature's child." 

Meanwhile Falso examined the fairy gift. There could be no doubt 
of its genuineness, — the nature of whosoever was shrouded in it would 
undergo a change ; and Falso knew as the maiden did not that Evening's 
youngest daughter must be Twilight. Suddenly his evil heart gave a 
bound. 

"I can't have Twio's love," he thought, "and I can't prevent her 
nature from becoming like that of Fire ; but if she is the twilight spirit 
she will be with Fire for but a short time each day, and if I rule the 
realm of artificial light I can often drive her from him even during 
those brief moments." 

So he smiled on the maiden before him and said: 

u Twio, don't go to Mother Nature. I can drape the scarf around 
you as well as she can." 

"Is that what the Fairy Queen wished me to go to Mother Nature 
for ? She said I must ash Mother Nature about it." 

"Assuredly, that is what she meant," replied the wicked elf, and he 
began drawing the moonlight gauze around Twio's shoulders. Her 
eyes became more starlike, her form more slender, her hair mistier ; and 
the elf sped away to Mother Nature again. 

"I wish to rule the realm of Falselight," he said, and Mother Nature 

acquiesced. 

******* 

So, because of Twio's unintentional disobedience, the lovers are often 
kept apart. Their natures are the same, but Twio is Twilight now, and 
she can only come to Fire for one short hour a day. Mother Nature 
would have told her this, had she come to her as Titania commanded. 
Falso is Falselight, and he is glad when mortals bring him in early 
that he may drive Twio from her sweetheart. Yet because of their 
love for each other, the lovers shed a peculiar blessing on man that mor- 
tals may love the twilight hour and delay the time of Falselight's reign. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 147 



The Close of a Winter Day. 



MARY C. SHUFOED. 



It was five o'clock on a December afternoon, and all across the west- 
ern sky there was blazoned a long, low strip of crimson, deep and vivid, 
the last touches of the sunken sun. The coming night was crisp and 
cold ; the thronging crowds on the streets of the busy town drew their 
wraps a little closer and hurried on their way. The sharpness of the 
wind set one's blood a tingle, and drove away all dullness and ill temper, 
so that the scene had an aspect of good will and friendliness as well as 
bustle and haste. The spirit of the coming Christmas season was al- 
ready abroad in the air. All down the long street could be seen the 
busy clerks, beyond the wide expanse of windows ; the tired shoppers, 
hurrying out of the stores laden with packages ; the working people has- 
tening by ; the schoolgirls and boys going home to supper ; gay young 
faces and weary old ones ; all sorts and kinds of people seemingly but 
with one aim : to reach the place where shelter and rest awaited them. 
And above this busy scene the glare of myriads of lights — and all around 
the clang of the crowded street cars, the rumble of the heavy carriages, 
greetings spoken, and laughing voices in gay salute ; these mingled to- 
gether to defy the blackness and piercing chill of the winter night. 

A crowd of young people, just out from the matinee, pushed into the 
already filled car, and made it gay with laughter and friendly jest. 
One of these, a young girl, warmly encased in wraps and furs, left the 
party at the comer with pleasant farewell. The crimson glare in the 
west had faded now into a faint glow, the last farewell of the sun, so 
she hurried through the gathering darkness, against the keen north 
wind, toward certain beckoning lights in the distance, which sent a 
warmer glow into her heart than that in the winter sky. As she hur- 
ried nearer she could see, through the broad windows, the leaping blaze 
of the fire, the soft radiance of the lights, and the merry group within. 
Her steps quickened still more in anticipation, and running up the wide 
walk and across the porch she flung open the heavy door. Then, in 
startling contrast to the cold, bleak, unfriendly aspect of the night, as 



148 The St. Mary's Muse. 



she crossed the threshold, there greeted, surrounded, and enveloped her, 
Light, Warmth, Cheer, Love and Welcome — all that goes to make up 
Home. 



New Year, the K in 9- 



VIRGINIA RANDOLPH BOLLING PICKEL. 



I. 

To-day I answer to a king's high call, 
Princely his mien, bearing in his train 

Treasures past telling, which he gives to all 
Who truly seek within his one-year reign. 

II. 

And offices he has that he bestows 

On all who live, whether they fain would frown 
Upon their charge or smile. He gives all those 

Function, as serf or knight or witless clown. 

III. 

Yet 'tis we must choose our gifts from out his store, 
— For free though binding is this great king's rule, 

And we must say by high or humble score 
Whether we be his knight or jesting fool. 



When " Marse Jim" Came H°ir> e - 



REBECCA WOOD. 



"Well, Marse Jim clone come, and I 'spec de white folks gwine ter 
hab a mighty time up ter de big house," began the old colored woman, 
looking up from her patching. 

"What dat you say, ole 'oman ?" inquired Uncle Abe, as he held the 
old shoe he was mending up to the window to catch the light of the 
winter sunset. 

"I say de white folks gwine ter hab pow'ful big doins, count o' this 
bein' Marse Jim's las' Chris'mus home from the 'Versity an' 'long o' 
Miss Lindy a-flyin' roun' wid de young gent'men jest like one o' dese 
little blue an' gol' butterflies 'mongst de young corn." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 149 

" 'Pears to me, Madory," chuckled the old man, "dat dem two chil- 
luns suits one an'er mighty well. Dey been a-runnin' roun' here to- 
gedder ever since dey could run. Don't you 'member de time her ma 
brought Miss Lindy over here, an' she fell in the branch down yonder, 
au' Marse Jim he fished her out ? Lan' ! I ricollect how dey come up 
de walk — she a-cryin' an' he a-holdin' on ter her little wet han'." 

Then Aunt Madora took up the thread where he dropped it, "Atter 
a while, when dey got little bigger, dey us'en ter skeer me plum ter 
death a-ridin' all the wil' colts on de lot an' a-climbin' de trees twel I 
thought dey would break der necks fer sho'. Dere wan't no place 
Marse Jim went dat Miss Lindy didn't try to follow atter him, 'cept 
on top the big barn, an' I 'low she'd a-tried dat too ef Ole Marse hadn' 
a-come up 'bout dat time, an' yanked Marse Jim down." 

There was a long silence, broken only by the ticking of the clock ou 
the newspaper-covered mantle, and the sputtering of the fire in the 
smoky, old-fashioned fireplace. 

''Well, I 'spec' I better git about fixin' some supper fer you, 'case, ef 
I don't, I know you gwine ter lay inter me," remarked the old negress, 
raking half a dozen potatoes from the ashes. 

"I 'spec' you better had," returned her husband. Then, after a 
pause, he continued, "I wouldn' be surprised ef 'fore long Miss Lindy 
ain't a-bossin' Marse Jim roun', jest like you been a-doin' me all dese 
years, case jes' las' night, as I come through de hall, I heared Ole Marse 
an' Young Marse a-talkin' in de liberry. Young Marse was pow'ful 
eames' an' I heared him drap Miss Lindy's name." 

"Ef he wants her he'll sho' git her, 'case you know couldn't nobody 
'fuse Marse Jim. You know dat, don't you, nigger?" Aunt Madora 
stopped, indignant at the thought of anybody's refusing her young mas- 
ter, and shook her fist violently in the air. Then, as if a little ashamed 
of her outburst, she said gruffly to her husband, "But, you stop yer 
talkin', an' come git your supper. I got too much ter do ter be a-foolin' 
'long dis way." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. s = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, I908-'09. 

Mary Campbell Shuford, Editor in Chief. 

Ida Jean Rogeeson, Business Manager. 

Rebe Hill Shields, ) XT „„ ro VA tt^ a Minnie Hazard, 1 r!*n«»™ tow™. 

Alice Leigh Hikes, j News Edl *° r s- Lena Everett, j Llte ™ r y Editors. 

Paula Hazard, Annie C. Wood, Mary Ruth Mardre, Associate Editors. 

Laura Meares, Exchange Editor. 

Frances Bottum, Assistant Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL. 



New Year. 



New Year ! What hopes and aspirations are contained in these two 
words and with what renewed energy, as we hear its welcoming bells 
ring out into the clear midnight air, do we determine to make the com- 
ing year the most fruitful of our lives ; but even as these thoughts come 
to us we are saddened by the knowledge that last year, too, our ideals 
were the same as this, and yet what was the result ? Nothing. Let us, 
however, not be discouraged by the failures of past years, but use the 
remembrance of them as a spur to greater and nobler efforts. 



Robert E. Lee. 



On the 19th of this month comes the anniversary of Robert E. Lee's 
birthday. As is usual on this day, exercises under the direction of the 
two literary societies will be held here at the school. This is an occa- 
sion which should be dear to all Southerners, and as the day is com- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 151 

memorated in many places throughout the South, it seems fitting that 
we of St. Mary's should continue the practice of past years in paying 
honor to the memory of this great man. Yet how many of us know 
all that we ought to know about General Lee ? Those who were fortu- 
nate enough to hear the inter-society debate last year on the question of 
Lee and Davis doubtless learned much concerning the former's war 
record. But it is not only as a great soldier that Lee is remembered, 
though it is as a soldier that he stands foremost in our minds; he was 
great as a scholar and a statesman, but, above all, he was a true South- 
ern gentleman and the type of a noble Christian man, and as such he 
will ever hold a firm place in the hearts of all loyal Southerners. 

Let us all enter heartily into the exercises to be held in commemora- 
tion of his birthday, and reverently honoring him, let us carry away 
and cherish in our hearts a deeper affection for this our beloved Con- 
federate hero. M. T. H. 



The Muse acknowledges with thanks the receipt of the following 
December exchanges : Chatterbox, College Message, Concept, Emory 
and Henry Era, Erskinian, Georgian, Goldsboro High School Maga- 
zine, Ch'eensboro High School Magazine, Grenadian, Guilford Colle- 
gian, High School Folio, Horce Scholasticoe, Lenoirian, Mary Baldwin 
Miscellany, Mercerian, Messenger of the Durham High School, Mes- 
senger of Richmond College, Newberry Stylus, Oracle of Duval High 
School, Palmetto, Park School Gazette, Quill, Red and White, Stetson 
Weekly Collegiate, Tileston Topics, University of Utah Chronicle, 
Wake Forest Student, Winthrop College Journal. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Alice Leigh Hines, Rebe Hill Shields, Editors. 



The Christmas Tree. 
The annual Christmas tree was given this year under the direction 
of the Muse Thursday night, December seventeenth. At eight o'clock 
all the school and friends gathered in the Art room, where the Christ- 



152 The St. Mary's Muse. 



mas tree was beautifully decorated and lighted with candles. Directly 
after they all arrived there the chorus class sang a Christmas carol. 
Then, amidst the giving out of candy and pops, sleigh bells could be 
heard and in came Santa and two little brownies. Miss Fenner was 
her own jolly self as Santa, and "in her element" when getting off the 
hits. Lila Justice and Nell Lewis were the pages. After the candy 
and poppers were distributed, Santa Claus gathered the small children 
around the tree, and they danced around it singing. After this Mr. 
Lay read a The Bird's Christmas Carol," and the gifts were distributed, 
and no one was forgotten. Then followed the hits and another carol, 
after which the girls just entertained themselves. 

fllice in Wonderland. 
On Wednesday morning, December sixteenth, we were told at assem- 
bly that there would be a short study hour that evening, and at eight- 
thirty the school was invited by the Faculty to an entertainment in 
the Auditorium. All day excitement and guesses prevailed, for we 
were not told in what sort of way we were to be entertained. But 
before the hour came it had leaked out that the performance was to be 
Alice in Wonderland, and we were all sure that we could not have 
enjoyed it more even if it had remained a secret until the curtain rose. 
Miss Cribbs was a most youthful and bewildered Alice, and Miss 
Thomas, as "the White Rabbit," was the "cutest" thing we ever im- 
agined. But we thought all of the parts were so well played that we 
would wish to praise each one separately if there were room. We 
must content ourselves with printing the program and stating that the 
audience was so convulsed with merriment that, like the jurymen for 
the Knave of Hearts Trial, we received orders of suppression. The 
process being slightly different, we are afraid it was not so effectual in 

our case. 

ALICE IN WONDERLAND. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS. 

Alice Miss Cribb 

The Queen of Hearts Miss Lee 

The Duchess , Miss Kellogg 

The Cook Miss Katie McKimmon 

The Dormouse Elizabeth Lay 



The St. Mary's Muse. 153 

The Cheshire Cat Miss Sutton 

The Hatter Miss Gould 

The White Rabbit , Miss Thomas 

The March Hare Miss Luney 

The King of Hearts Mr. Cruikshank 

The Knave of Hearts Miss Horsley 

The Executioner Mr. Stone 

The Gryphon Miss Jones 

The Mock Turtle Miss Fenner 

Guards and Ladies in Waiting. .Mrs. Leake, Misses Hull, Pixley, Russell and Walton 

David Bispham. 

The great baritone singer, David Bispham, will give a recital in the 

Auditorium at St. Mary's on the evening of February eighth. Mr. 

Bispham ''has commanded universal praise alike, in oratories, in opera 

and in song recital." As a balladist, he is particularly successful, — his 

dramatic power being so strong. His program has not yet been made 

public, but it is sure to be of the high character that is invariable 

with him. 

Mrs. Andrews' Reception. 

On the 7th of January Mrs. W. J. Andrews entertained in honor of 
Mrs. A. B. Andrews, Jr. Several of the girls and teachers were guests 
at this delightful reception. In the music room, Miss Hull and Miss 
Pixley rendered several charming selections on the piano and violin. 

The Woman's Club. 
At the meeting of the Department of Music of the Woman's Club, 
December 10, Miss Dowd read a "Sketch of the Life and Works of 
Handel and Haydn," and was responsible for the program illustrating 
the works of these composers. Miss Pixley, and Miss Hull, and Miss 
Dowd's pupils, Misses Lena Taylor and Frankie Self, rendered several 
numbers. The program was as follows : 

THE WOMAN'S CLUB OF RALEIGH. 

Department of Music, 

Thursday, December 10, 1908. 

sketch of the 

LIFE AND WORKS OF HANDEL AND HAYDN. 

Miss Martha A. Dowd. 

PROGRAM: 

Menuetto ( from Symphony in E Flat ) , arr. for Piano Haydn 

Miss Lena Taylor and Miss Frankie Self. 



154 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"My mother bids me bind my hair" ' Haydn 

"Lascia chi'io piangia," from the opera "Rinaldo" Handel 

Mrs. Charles McKimmon, 

Largo, from "Xerxes," for two Violins and Piano Handel 

Miss Hull, Miss Fannie Johnson, Miss Pixley. 

(a) "Hark to the Linnet," •> , ,, . . ~ T ,, „ „ , . 

I from the oratorio Jeptha Handel 

(b) "Waft her, ye angels," J l 

Mrs. Horace Dowell. 

Trio No. 1, G Major ( Piano, Violin, Cello, ) Haydn 

Andante, 
Adagio, 

Rondo all 'Ongarese. 
Miss Pixley, Miss Hull, Dr. George Summey, Jr. 

Trinity College Glee Club. 
Shortly before the holidays the Trinity College Glee Club gave an 
entertainment at St. Mary's under the auspices of the Muse Club. The 
performance was very much enjoyed. 

PROGRAM. 
Part One. 

1. Minstrel Overture Witmark 

The Club. 

2. Solo — As Long as the World Rolls On Herbert 

A. D. Jones. 

3. Harp Solo — Song to the Evening Star Tannhauser 

B. S. Hurley. 

4. In Absence Dudley Buck 

Quartet. 

5. Medley Arranged 

The Club. 
Intermission. 

Part Two. 

1. Down in the Deep Let Me Sleep When I Die ., Petrie 

Edgar Howerton. 

2. Anchored Cowan 

The Club. 

3. Reading — "And He Played on the Harps of a Thousand Strings, Spirits of Just 

Men Made Perfect." 

B. S. Hurley. 

4. I Want to Go Down South Once More Parks 

Quartet. 

5. Good-night, Beloved, Good-night Oliver 

The Club. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 155 



School Notes. 



— Mary Kipps returned home before the Christmas holidays began. 
— Miss Gould recently enjoyed a delightful visit at Pinehurst. 
— Elizabeth Smith, who is studying at the Southern Conservatory of 
Music in Durham, spent several days at St. Mary's before Christmas. 

— We all regret very much that Augusta Divine, on account of ill 
health, had to return home before the Christinas holidays. We hope 
that she will soon be well enough to join us again. 

— Mr. Lay recently had an extended Northern trip in behalf of the 
improvements, which, we hope, can soon be begun. 

— Hallie Carrison, Lillian and Lucia Yates and Miss Thomas went 
to Camden before the Christmas holidays for the Carrison-Thomas 
wedding. This wedding is of especial interest to St. Mary's, as the 
bride — Emily Carrison — was a St. Mary's graduate in 1907, and as 
the groom is Miss Thomas's brother. 

— Lucy Harrison is fortunate in having her father in Raleigh during 
the Legislature. 

— We are all glad to welcome as "new girls" for the Easter term 
Dorothy Harman, Liza Pender and Aimie Moore. 

— The six girls — Frances Bottum from Texas, Wilmer Stone from 
Louisiana, Constance Cavell and Margaret Nelson from Florida, Mary 
Owen from Central America, and Estelle Egerton from Western North 
Carolina — who spent Christmas at school, tell us that they spent a 
pleasant holiday. They were entertained several times by the Bishop 
and Mr. and Mrs. Lay. 

— Miss Jones spent several days of the holiday at school with a 
friend, then she enjoyed trips to Atlanta and Hillsboro. Miss Cribbs 
and Miss Luney also spent Christmas at St. Mary's. 

— Hilda Broadwood's mother is spending some time in Raleigh. 

— Margaret Pennington, Mary Kipps, Dorothy and "Tiny" Eld- 
redge, Augusta Divine, Jessie Woodall, Gladys Clark, Martha Ferebee, 



156 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Coatsie Benedict, Delamar Bur-bank, Lily Taylor, Louise Morphew, 
and Nellie Holmes Pearson have not, we regret to say, yet returned to 
school. We hope that some of them, at least, will he back soon. 

— Eliza Morton is made very happy by having her parents with her 
during the session of the Legislature. 

■ — Mrs. Thurman Kitchin (Beba Clark) was at St. Mary's during the 
inauguration. 

— Mr. Lay was a speaker this year at the Southern Educational As- 
sociation which met December 29-31. His subject was, "Uniform, 
Intelligent and Honest Standards in Secondary Education." 

— Mr. Hodgson arrived during the holidays and is still with us. 
His presence and his music give us their old-time pleasure. This 
time Mr. Hodgson has fitted the organ with an electric motor — a con- 
venience which has lone: been needed. 



The Holiday in School. 

During the Christmas holidays the six girls who stayed at St. Mary's 
had a most enjoyable time. 

Besides the joy of being able to sleep late, skip meals, keep the lights 
on after ten and go down town whenever they chose, they were enter- 
tained several times. The party given by Mr. and Mrs. Lay was espe- 
cially original and enjoyable. The feature of the evening was a set 
of conundrums written by Mr. Lay, the answers to which were the 
names, or suggestive of the names, of the different guests. We print 
the set, leaving the answers to be found by our readers : 

1. Ellen's little boy. 

2. The missing right arm of the Apollo Belvidere. 

3. Still due. 

4. The limit— or 2200 pounds. 

5. Way down in the well. 

6. A cavern with two side rooms. 

7. An onion, but no lemon. 

8. A bad thing in a hull. 

9. Henry, the boy who belongs to the Bishop's staff. 

10. Where old Dobbin and his mate get their dinners. 

11. Way over where the zephyrs blow. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 157 



12. A noble poet's rhythmic song, 

Who tells how right shall conquer wrong; 
Or sings a lover's ardent sighs, 
Then stirs the heart, bedews the eyes. 

13. A perfect sphere. Shut up. 

14. A descendant of the first half of a general mess. 

15. She's like the moon, her modest ray 

Shines on though sun blaze through the day. 
None see her then, though she is there; 
But when night comes, her radiance fair 
Guides well our steps with modest light, 
And men then bless her — Queen of Night. 

'Tis true she changes, also true 
The side she shows to mortal view 
Is e'er the same. Her constant face 
Shines always on the human race. 
As she hides part from night to night, 
We see her best by partial light. 

Men think that they are half insane 
Who hide their virtues and make plain 
Their wit when men in darkness seek 
The modest brilliance of the meek. 
Then let us crave that richest boon, 
To be in some sort like the moon. 



The girls will never forget the evening spent at Bishop Cheshire's. 
Happiest evenings are often spent before a great open fire when the 
lights are turned low, when every one popped pop-corn and sang old 
songs and carols. This was one of those happiest evenings, the remem- 
brance of which will bring pleasure on the hardest days. 

New Year's night the girls themselves, with Mrs. Lay's assistance, 
gave a party. Mrs. Lay was "The Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe" 
and the rest were her children. All sorts of nice baby games were 
played ; there was a Virginia reel ; Mr. Hodgson played his famous 
"Froggie Song" from "Fashions," and Miss Luney the "Dancing 
Doll," of which we never tire ; and Mrs. Lay honored the company with 
two songs. Every one contributed to the fun with nonsense verses. 

Mary Owen. 



158 The St. Mary's Muse. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN. 



Opposition. — "Er — Miss Brown — er — do you think your father 
Would oppose my marrying you ?" 

"If he is of my opinion he would." — Philadelphia Inquirer. 



Riddles. 

(With Apologies to Tennyson.) 
Ask me no more! Pray, wherefore worry me 
With talk of when is this and why is that, 
Or abnormalities about a cat, 
Or eke a dog. When have I answered thee? — 
Ask me no more! 

Ask me no more! What answer should I give? 

I know not when a door's transformed; I can't 

Imagine why a hen should gallivant 
Across the street ; I can not, as I live ! 
Ask me no more! 

Ask me no more! I'm feeling far from well. 
From vain attempts at guessing I am numbed. 
Pray, where was Moses when the light succumbed? 
Tell me, then stop! — for at a touch I yell. 
Ask me no more! 

— From Harpers Magazine. 



Kate (on a very hot day in June) : "Oh! me, I am suffocating!" 
Bessie (aged five, fanning vigorously): "Oh! clear, I'm 'stew- 
Bessieling.' " 



Exquisite. — He (looking through his glass) — "There's a glorious 
glacier which we shall soon reach.". 

She — "Oh, won't it make a lovely background to my blue frock !" — 
Meggendorfer Bloetter. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS, 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ehnest Cbuikshank - - - - Alumnse Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

IMrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Mrs. 1 M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 
Mrs. F. P. Tucker, Raleigh, 
Mrs.Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL. 



Tlie Alumnae are propably aware that the editors of the Muse have 
been recently making every effort to extend its circulation quite mate- 
rially. The editors are still handicapped by having a most incomplete 
list of those Alumna? who are not already subscribers, but they are able 
to report an increase of nearly fifty within a comparatively short time, 
which is gratifying, though less than was hoped for ; but they ask again 
that all those who are still interested in St. Mary's will send in some 
response, even if they do not care to subscribe to the Muse. To help 
toward compiling this list, which is so important to the Muse and to 
the whole body of the Alumna?, would be a service most gratefully 
acknowledged. 



Alumnae Weddings. 



From the Charlotte Observer: 

DRANE— THOMAS. 

As pretty a wedding as one ever witnesses graced the residence of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jordan S. Thomas on Elizabeth Heights last night, (Jan. 29,) at 7 o'clock, when 
their daughter, Miss Florence Jackson Thomas, became the bride of Mr. Brent 
Skinner Drane, a native of Edenton. Occurring amid an environment transformed 
in obedience to the promptings of artistic taste into a bower of attractive decorations, 
with every appointment perfect, there was about it all the impressiveness and beauty 
of unostentatious and unaffected simplicity. 

Rev. Dr. Robert B. Drane, of Edenton, father of the bridegroom, assisted by Rev. 
Harris Mallinckrodt, Rector of St. Peter's Episcopal Church, performed the ceremony. 



160 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The musical notes of Mendelssohn's "Wedding March," played by Miss Margaret 
Reese, announced the arrival of the moment for the solemn yet happy celebration of 
the matrimonial vows, and the party entered the parlor set apart for the service. 
Holly, bamboo, hyacinths, ferns and palms everywhere met the eye in plentiful pro- 
fusion, exhaling an aroma of subtlest fragrance. 

Miss Thomas was lovely in her handsome hand-embroidered gown of white batiste, 
carrying a shower boquet of lilies of the valley. Attending the bride were: Miss 
Sadie Thomas, her sister, maid of honor; Misses Eliza Drane, of Edenton; Marie 
Thomas; Mary Henderson, of Salisbury; Mary Sumner Clark, of Wilmington; Annie 
Wilson; and Louise Venable, of Chapel Hill, as bridesmaids. The maid of honor and 
bridesmaids wore white net and carried white narcissus and asparagus ferns. The 
groom was attended by his best man, Mr. Robert Lassiter, of Oxford. The ribbon 
girls were little Misses Arabelle Thomas, Annie Taliaferro, Joy Draper, Catherine 
Gilmer and Alethia and Margaret Bland. 

Soon after the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. Drane left for Edenton. After a short stay 
there and a return here they will leave for Porto Rico, where Mr. Drane is in the 
irrigation service of the United States Government. 

Among the out-of-town guests were: Miss Eliza Drane, of Edenton; Miss Lucy 
Barrow, of Savannah, Ga. ; Miss Sallie Hull, of Athens, Ga. ; Miss Louise Venable, 
of Chapel Hill; Rev. and Mrs. Robert B. Drane, and Mr. Frank Drane, of Edenton; 
Dr. George G. Thomas, Mr. George G. Thomas, Jr., Miss Belle Thomas, and Miss 
Mary Sumner Clark, of Wilmington; Mr. and Mrs. John S. Henderson, Jr., of Salis- 
bury; Miss Josephine Boylan, of Raleigh; Miss Mary Houston, of Baltimore, and 
Mr. Longstreet Hull, of Athens, Ga. 



From the News and Observer: 

HAMILTON— THOMPSON. 

Married on Tuesday evening, December 22d, at Christ Church, Raleigh, Rev. Milton 
A. Barber officiating, Mary Cornelia, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Augustus 
Thompson, and Joseph G. de Roulhac Hamilton. 

The attendants were Miss Louise Venable, of Chapel Hill, maid of honor; Miss 
May Montague and Miss Mary Armistead Jones, of Raleigh, bridesmaids. 

The best man was Mr. Daniel Heyward Hamilton, Jr., of Baltimore, brother of the 
groom. 

The groomsmen and ushers were Frank P. Haywood, of this city; John J. Blair, of 
Wilmington; Hugh A. Thompson, of this city; Vernon H. Whitaker, of Birmingham, 
Ala., Ivey F. Lewis, of Ashland, Va.; James H. Brodie, of Henderson. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 161 



Alumnae Notes. 



Mrs. Iredell has just returned from a visit to Cincinnati, where she 
spent part of the time with Miss McVea, and part with Miss Czarnom- 

ska, both of whom are professors in the University of Cincinnati. 

* * * 

Miss Anna Dunlap ("Jinimie Dunlap") was a recent visitor at St. 
Mary's. She came with her sister, Margaret, who has entered St. 

Mary's. 

* * * 

Miss Florence Slater spent a few of the holidays in Ealeigh, staying 
with Mrs. Knox. It is gratifying to know that Miss Slater's health is 
so much improved. The Muse takes the liberty of quoting from a 
recent letter of Miss Slater, which we think will interest many of our 
Alunmas. 

She says : 

I spent Thanksgiving holidays with two old St. Maryites, Mr. and Mrs. Bancker 
Smedes. If you had been at school around the 80's you would not be surprised at my 
calling Mr. Smedes an alumnus. Bancker and Charlie Smedes played dolls with us 
when we were little, and waltzed with us when we were bigger, — they were almost a 
part of the landscape. Mrs. Smedes nee Lillie Hicks belonged to the famous Class 
of '92. 

Bishop Atkinson once said that where a St. Mary's girl lived one would always 
find Church work. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smedes are living in a picturesque village near New York. The 
church there needed a roof, and a bazaar was gotten up by the good people, and I 
hear that our St. Mary's friends, "Old King Cole," and a Japanese lady were most 
successful in selling Japanese tea and tobacco. 

Emmie Smedes, assisted by Eliza N. Knox and Emilie Rose Knox, have just given 
a charming operetta in Grace Church Chapter House, Washington, D. C. 

I find that there are nineteen St. Mary's girls in New York and its suburbs, and 
I hope that we may be able to form a New York Chapter of St. Mary's Alumns. 

* * * 

The news of the tragic death of Mr. H. B. Short, of Lake Waccamaw, 
has just reached us. The Muse extends its deepest sympathy to his 
daughters, Marguerite and Mary Allan (Mrs. Skelding) an alumna. 
The recent death of Mrs. Short makes their bereavement doubly sad. 



Edwards & Broughton Printing Co., Raleigh, N. C. 



REfJD !— MflRK !-fJCT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



" It's worth the difference " 



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" Workers in Artistic Photography ' 



The Terrors of English. 

If an S and an I and an O and a U, 

With an X at the end spell Su. 

And an E and a Y and E spell /, 

Pray, what is a speller to do? 

Then, if also, an S and an I and a G 

And H-E-D spell side, 

There's nothing much left for a speller to do 

But go commit siouxeye sighed. 



-Red and White. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL CO 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
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LADIES' EINE SHOES «S SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVII/LE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



Smith s Torrcst Co. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Society Monogram Papers, Visiting Cards and Stationery 

OF THE NICEST QUALITY AND LATEST STYLES AT 

ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO'S BOOKSTORE 

A Good Grade Fountain Pen at $1.00 



Raleigh and Southport Railway 

Short line between Raleigh and Fayetteville, 
Wilmington, Maxton, Red Springs, Bennettsville, 
Florence, Charleston, and all Atlantic Coast Line 
points. For information as to schedule and rates 
call on local agent, or write 

F. T. RICKS, 
Asst. General Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, H. W. JACKSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. T. DORTCH, Secretary. 



fl Matter of Taste. 
I met a goat and said to him, 

"The question, pray excuse; 
Why do you always wag your chin?" 

Quoth he, "Because I chews." 



-D. H. S. Messenger, 



M. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 

WILMDT6TOX & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 
BANKING. 
All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 


The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital, $ 100,000.00 
Surplus, - - lOO.OOO.OO 
Deposits, - 1,175,000.00 
Assets, - 1,500,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Beown, Pres. H. E. Litchfoed, Cashier 


THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 


St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 


JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
f Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 








fls it Migbt Have Been Written. 

When lovely woman lives too jolly, 

And finds her hair at last turned gray, 
What charm can soothe her melancholy, 

What potion wash her age away? 

The only art her years to cover, 

To hide her age from every eye; 
To bring again the youthful lover 

Back to her bosom is, to — dye! 

— Louis I. Jaffe, in the Trinity Archive. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


KING-CROWELVS DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 


WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 


ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 


Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 


GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing 1 Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 



INSURE IN THE 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE 
INSDRANGE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY. 

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW 

Ladies' Furnishings and Novelties. 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 
COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Candy— China. 

Pictures. Stationery. Toys. 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



He met her in the meadow 
As the sun was sinking low; 

They walked along together 
In the twilight's afterglow; 

She waited while gallantly 
He lowered all the bars, 



Her soft eyes bent upon him, 

As radiant as the stars. 
She neither smiled nor thanked him, 

For indeed she knew not how; 
He was just a farmer's lad, 

And she a Jersey cow. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBE-INS" LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

'PHONES 81. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 


J. SCHWARTZ, 
RICHMOND MARKET. 


H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds. 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 


Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBT. SIMPSON, ^SSHSBS etc. 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

Dentist. - 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 


H. T. HICKS CO. 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, X, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 

Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 
Francis P.Vesable, Pres., Cbapel Hill, N. C. 



School Calendar, 1908-09. 



January. 
January 5, Tuesday, 7 p. m. — Christmas vacation ends. 
January 19, Tuesday — Lee"s Birthday, special exercises. 
January 19-21 — Examination week. 
January 21, Thursday — Easter Term begins. 
January 27, Wednesday — Poe Centennial Celebration, special exercises. 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited. 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 

Fayetteville Street. 




YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pullen 
Pres., Cbas. Root, Cash'r. Capital and Surplus 
875,000. Four percent interest paid on deposits, 



■:■ v; 




yr the Oaro linas. 

Cti maie Healthy^ and Salubrious,; 

S'Tv? : Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 



66th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 17, 1908. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TEKMsi. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JAN UAKY 21, 1909. 



St, Martfsr 

offers inslrttction in these 
Department* : 



1. THE COLLEGE, fff 

iB.THE MUSIC SCHOOL, 

S. 7 HE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

I THE Am SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1908-09 arc enrolled 200 students from 16 Dioceses. 

#?S8S Twenty-five Members of the Faculty. 



toll Furn.shzd, Progress** Music Department. Much £gu>pment Xe». Twtnty-eight: 

« J P ^t al attenHon to the Social and Christian side, of Education without stiohi 
't<t-tw Smoiasiic 'ra^3.^&fB^|^^'WJ4': ' ... Ij^^^H ■:'■■■ I H 



For Catalogue und other information address 




Rev. George: WlLay, 

I l.RECi'OR. 



St, Aan>'e fllbuee 



IDalentine IRumbev 



jfebruar?, t909 



IRalefob, 1H. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



VALENTINE NUMBER. 



Vol. XIII. February, 1909. No. 6 



Evening. 



IRMA DEATON. 



The sun is setting in the western sky, 

And little clouds that late were fleecy white, 

Attendants of the glorious king of day, 
Take on new beauty in the golden light. 

The splendor fades; the fair earth, that hut now 

Lay in the glory of the sunset glow, 
Is wrapped in somber gray; and now draws near 

The evening hour, with murmurs hushed and low. 

The darkness falls; and one by one the stars 

Appear, and with a soft, clear light 
The bright moon shines. The busy hum of day 

Is lost amid the stillness of the night. 



St. Valentine's Rescue. 



VIRC4INIA RANDOLPH BOLLING PICKEL. 



Once upon a time in the kingdom, of Gales a bold band of robbers 
harassed the land. They carried off the cattle ; and burned the crops ; 
and waylaid travelers. Still, if they had done only this perhaps no one 
would have so bitterly complained ; for these robbers were long estab- 
lished, and it seemed only just that the people should have some kind 
of trial which might well take the form of an outlaw band rather than 
famine or pestilence or war. But one day in their audacity the high- 
waymen carried off the good Father of the Realm, without whose con- 
sent and blessing no marriage ever took place. A howl of protest arose. 



164 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The people might well spare a few beeves and sheep, but Father Valen- 
tine they could not spare any more than love affairs and weddings. 
The king sent his valiant knights against the bandits, but they returned 
unable to find the lawless stronghold. Then the great king himself set 
out; but his attendants and his heart failed him when the Death Spirit 
wailed deeply outside his tent. 

"There seems no good in it," proclaimed the king, and returned to his 
palace. It seemed that Father Valentine was indeed lost to the king- 
dom ; but the end was not yet, for the robbers had committed a fatal 
error. One day just before the king's expedition against them, the 
highwaymen seized a young shepherd and his flock, and drove them to 
their hilly stronghold. There they forced Darby still to tend his flock ; 
but they had not done with him, because he had a sweetheart in the 
person of Joan, a young dairy maid. When Father Valentine was 
seized, she was indignant, and now that Darby was snatched away she 
had a most personal grudge against the bandits. One day she sought 
an audience with the king; she told her mission, and she said, 

"Sir King, I pray you go against the plunderers." 

"The powers are against it," replied the sovereign. "The Death 
Spirit gave the sign." 

"Hear me, my Lord," said Joan, "it was not the Death Spirit's wail 
you heard, but it was my Darby's shepherd-horn. It was his signal to 
me, for we have planned that deep note when in trouble." 

"But my good Joan," said the king, "we heard the wail, and our cour- 
tiers heard it. We can not think it mortal sound." 

"Aye," said Joan, "but I will show you it was a horn," and she herself 
blew a blast, deep and weird. The court started at its likeness to the 
Death Spirit's cry; and the king said, half persuaded, 

"Even were it so, we know not where to find the outlaws' den." 

"That I will show you also," said Joan, "for by his strange call Darby 
has led me until I know it clings among the Elfin Hills." 

Therefore the great king with his valiant knights and men-at-arms 
set out again to destroy the lawless pests and to bring back Father 
Valentine to the land where the wedding bells rang no more. Joan 
went with them. Towards the close of the day they came to a high, 
stony cliff. On top was a great pile of rocks. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 165 



"Let us away, bold knights," cried the king. "These missiles will 
crush our last breath. Our ladies would rather not hear of future hus- 
bands, than that we return dead." And they decided to halt and hold 
a council. 

"Surely those are great rocks to hurl upon us," said Sir Bonamour, 
the bravest of the knights. 

"It is a false trap, and we shall not escape," said another. 

"Then, let us back to the palace," said the king. But just there Joan 
begged leave to enter. 

a Sirs," she said, "It is deceit, indeed, but will work no harm. The 
fierce pile is made of hats, and Darby's cap is placed atop of all. The 
outlaws think to fright us with mere show. We may proceed." The 
party moved onward again ; and now the shadows of night fell, and the 
pale moonlight poured down weirdly. Joan approached the head of 
the train to tell the king the robbers' hold was nigh. 

"We must be cautious," he said ; and then he reeled in fright, and 
looked to see the whole line had reeled in fright. For just in front 
a steep hill loomed, and a great shadow moved over them. They looked 
up .and saw a great figure clad in shining armor. 

" 'Tis the shadow of a great giant to destroy us," they cried. "Flee ! 
Flee!" 

"Xo shadow save from a passing cloud !" cried Joan, "No giant ! 
~No ! A man placed by the robbers. And look ! 'Tis Darby ! He 
blows on his deep horn." 

She seized the king's bright sword, and sped up the hill. 

"Darby ! Darby !" she shouted. Some of the boldest of the knights 
scrambled after her. Their swords were their alpenstocks ; and the 
loosened rocks rolled down ; and the dust rose in the ghostly moonlight. 

The robbers were now aroused. They sprang out to meet the assault ; 
but the cloudy dust, and the flashing swords, and the clamor struck 
panic to their hearts. 

"Fiends of Hell !" they cried, "astride of lightnings !" and they fled. 
Meanwhile Joan rushed straight to Darby. Father Valentine stood 



near 



Quick," she said, grasping each. "They will be back, and you are 
all I came for." She pushed them down the hill; but in going her foot 



166 The St. Mary's Muse. 



caught, and her ankle was wrenched. It was the Good Father who rose 
to the situation, for he recognized their escape as due to Joan, if effected. 

"I could not aid in storming the den," he said, "and my staff was 
powerless to rout the brigands, but now I can help with my limbs. 
Lean on me, good Joan, and I will bear you." So they escaped. Mean- 
while the bold knights, bereft of Joan, thought no more to dispatch the 
pestilential band ; and fled also. 

So Joan has Darby; and Gales has Father Valentine and wedding- 
bells once more ; and the king has the boast of rescuing the saint ; and 
the robbers still steal the nobles' cattle. Is it not all justly settled ? 



Poe as a Poet. 



MINNIE TAMPLET HAZARD. 



There are those who would let the life of Poe shadow his work as 
poet. And yet, 

"His faults were such 
As thousands live and die with, unobserved, 
But, being his faults, because of his mind's light, 
They loomed like towers upon a sunset hill." 

These same ones will tell us that Poe had no mission, no message for 

mankind. Believing this, they have grown blind to the full greatness 

and the full beauty of his work. 

Here let us for only a moment recall some few of his poems. They 

speak best for themselves. The lines "To Helen" — a tribute to a 

woman's beauty — are simple, yet touched, as are all the others, with a 

rare charm. One here reads those oft-quoted words — 

"The glory that was Greece 
And the grandeur that was Rome" — > 

words few in number, yet they picture to the mind all the greatness of 
those two civilizations. In "Annabel Lee," you can not but admire the 
beauty of the poet's thought when he speaks of her as being with ties of 
kinship allied to the angels. The feeling in the poem grows, ending at 
the last in a full, passionate cry. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 167 

And another, "The Haunted Palace," is weirdly beautiful. Listen: 

"Banners yellow, glorious, golden, 

On its roof did float and flow, 
(This — all this — was in the olden 

Time long ago ) . 
And every gentle air that dallied, 

In that sweet day, 
Along the ramparts plumed and pallid, 

A winged odor went away." 

If one finds not in this music and beauty, where may such be found 
in poetry \ "The Raven" — that greatest of Poe's poems — takes us far- 
ther into the realm of weird gloom and into the chambers of a soul suf- 
fering. Mr. Stedman says that the Raven of Poe's dreams is "an em- 
blem of the irreparable, the guardian of pitiless memories." Yet withal 
the beautiful is here, too, strangely intermingled with the somberness of 
the thought. Who that has once read the poem can fail to keep ever in 
mind certain of its lines % And the coloring is very rich. It is 
"The silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain" 

that thrills us. And we learn that the dark chamber was draped in 
purple and in violet. But it is the poem — "Israfel" — at which one 
wishes last to look. "For once, and in his freest hour of youth, Poe 
got above the sepulchers and mists, even beyond the pale-faced moon, 
and visited the empyrean." The lines are sensuous and impassioned. 
Here Poe leaves his wonted realm — the ghoul-haunted woodlands, the 
dark caverns, where the voices were those of the dead, where the light 
streamed ever through stained windows, where the music was weird and 
strange. All this he leaves and seems to soar far above them. The 
haunted strains are silenced and one listens to "burning measures" of 
purest melody. The vision dawns clearer. And in this song there is 
ecstacy. Israfel sings "wildly well," even so that the stars listen and 
the music of the spheres is silenced. The poet touches high, beautiful 
things. In those lofty realms "deep thoughts are a duty." But at the 
last, we have a note of sadness. Israfel dwells in Heaven, but the poet 
remembers that 

"Our flowers are merely — dowers, 
And the shadow of thy perfect bliss 
Is the sunshine of ours." 



168 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Then after the sadness comes a cry. Poe, singer that he was, realized 
his limitations and here voices his longing for a nobler strain. 

Tlrus far we have bnt touched upon the individual beauties of a few 
poems. We want to hold them in mind when we answer the question — 
just what is it that makes Poe, the poet, famed. First, we shall say 
that he could be and he was "simple, sensuous, impassioned" ; and Mil- 
ton tells us these are the requirements of a great poet. He "possessed 
melody and imagination in a supreme degree." In the former quality 
Poe has had few equals, no master. To yourself first recall "The Bells" 
with their varying tones. It seems as though they will ring on for all 
time. A wonderful felicity of diction — that power which led Arnold 
to rank Keats with Shakespeare. This gift belonged to our poet. Lan- 
guage at his touch yields its all of beauty — a beauty so delicate yet 
withal so strong, so vast, so pervading — that few other hands have had 
the power to call it forth. It is potent to transfigure ghastliness and 
ugliness. But there are certain effects secured which we can not ex- 
plain. Poe baffles us here. Though we count the uses of alliteration, 
refrains, and all the usual poetic devices, we find them powerless to pro- 
duce like effects. There is something more in Poe's poetry, something 
intangible, something afar, that we can not grasp. We can only rejoice 
in it. One may not go farther and seek to analyze Poe. We come 
across dark hints in his poetry — vague questionings. Enough that we 
know and love this poetry for its beauty. 

Poe has been charged with a lack of substance in his verse — a charge 
that is largely just — yet one so dowered with fine qualities as he, may 
suffer this to be so. And after all is said, "a thing can never be great 
as long as it can be measured and valued ; it is only when it flies the 
scales and refuses to be computed that it becomes a part of the immortal 
heritage of the race." 

What, then, was Poe's ideal — that toward which he strove, and striv- 
ing gained such heights ? It was one with that of Shelley and Keats — 
beauty. To Poe poetry was sacred. Though his own life was at times 
soiled, never once did he suffer aught to stain his art. And one has told 
us that 

"Beauty is truth, truth beauty." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 169 

So it is through this beauty that Poe can and does help us. Listen to 
what another says: ''That men do not live by bread alone is the com- 
mon message of religion and art. That message was delivered by Poe 
with marvelous distinctness of speech." Let us also hold that the poet 
filled this mission to mankind. 



Aunt Mirandy's Ghost Tale. 



MILDRED BORDEN. 



"Mammy," asked little Nell, as her old negro nurse tucked her in her 
little white bed, "who used to put you to bed when you was a little girl 
like me ?" 

"Who use ter put me to bed when I was a little gal ? Lord ! child, 
I haint never had nobody to put me to bed in all me life, but jis my 
own sef\ But you go on and shet yo' eyes, honey, or some o' dem old 
things what use ter come adder dis old nigger 'ill git you." 

"But, mammy," pleaded the child, "I don't want to go to sleep. 
Please tell me about those old things that would try to get you when you 
were little." 

"Well, honey," if yer promise to be a good child and go right ter 
sleep, I'll tell yer one story. How 'member that I ain't gwine to tell 
you but jes' one." 

This pleased little Xell very much and readily promising all that the 
old negro wished she eagerly awaited the beginning. 

"It was one o' dem col' old nights," began the negro, "when de moon 
made everything look white and awful. Ma, she and all the old folks, 
was a sittin' 'round de fire a habin' a good time. Well, jes as I's a 
thinkin' dat I's gwine to set up a space, my old ma up and telled me 
to git to bed. I knowed dat dare wan't no use in sputin' wid ma, for 
when she say a thing she sho' mean it. So I jes git up, I did, and go to 
de nex' room and try to git ter sleep ; but I was like you, honey. I 
wanted to listen to de ol' folks, so I jes' laid up dare in de bed wid my 
eyes wide open, a hearin' dem old niggers a laffin in de nex' room. 

"All a sudden, I seed a big white somthin' in de corner o' de room. 

"Well, child, yo' ole mammy's heart jes' stood right smack still, and 



170 The St. Mary's Muse. 

she couldn't ev'n breathe, but she jes' gib one more big jump an' 
landed in de nex' room. 'Cose ma and de rest want a know what ailed 
me, but I was that scared dat I couldn't op'n ma mouf for a good space, 
but jes' pinted in de nex' room. Den when ma up and went in dare, 
bless yer if she didn't see cle same old ghos'. 

"Well, child, you couldn't make one o' dem niggers go in dat dar room 
no more'n nuffin 'till Marse Jean come and go in dar and make believe 
dat it want nuffin but one o' dem moon shadows. Case I ain't wantin' 
ter spute Marse Jean's words, but dat slio' was one mo' ghost, just as 
slio' as ma name is Mirandy." 

"But, mammy," broke in the child, "you don't believe in ghosts, do 
you ?" 

"Lord ! honey, believe in ghosts. You knows I do, when I'se seed 
'em wid me own eyes. But you must go to sleep now, or I ain't neber 
gwine ter tell you no mo' stories." 

With this, the old negro began rocking to and fro, singing one of her 
old lullabies to the child, who at last fell asleep knowing that the old 
mammy wanted to keep away from her charge all such ghosts as had 
troubled her childhood. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Rebe Shields, Alice L. Hines, Editors. 



Statistics. 

By an oversight the Muse has failed to record the results of "Sta- 
tistics" in an earlier issue. However, "better late than never." 

On the night of December 16th, the Seniors surprised every one by 
announcing that the yearly statistics for the Annual Muse would then 
be taken. Great excitement was general, and the one unfailing ques- 
tion was, "Who're you going to vote for ?" When at last the results 
were told the curious ones, it was found that St. Mary's girls think Mar- 
jorie Brown to be "the prettiest," Mildred Borden "the handsomest," 
Janie Patrick "the most popular," Ida Rogerson "the most coquettish," 
Sallie Haywood Battle "the most dignified," Lily Taylor "the cutest," 
Esther Rembert "the most attractive," Dell Burbank "the best dancer," 
and Hallie Carrison "the most courteous." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 171 

The Inter-Society Debaters. 

The attention of the Literary Societies has been turned to the ques- 
tion of the annual Inter-society Debate since the return from the holi- 
days; and at the last meeting of both the Societies the debaters were 
chosen. 

Julia Mclntyre and Ida Rogerson will uphold the honor of the 
Epsilon Alpha Pi against Mary C. Shuford and Janie DuBose, who 
will represent the Sigma Lambda. It is hoped that all the members 
on both sides will take a lively interest in the contest and so quicken the 
life of the Societies. 

The Inauguration. 

The school was very well represented at the inauguration of Governor 
Kitchin on January 12th. School duties were suspended at eleven- 
thirty and there was an early lunch, so that all who wished might go. 
Parties left the school about twelve o'clock and walked down to the 
Capitol just in time to see the procession of carriages come up. The 
girls then went around to the east side of the Capitol, where they saw 
the Governor inaugurated and heard his very impressive speech. 

Memorial Exercises. 

On Thursday night, January the twenty-first, all the students of St. 
Mary's and the Faculty were invited by the Daughters of the Confed- 
eracy to the Memorial Exercises commemorating General Lee's birth- 
day. The speeches and all the music were enjoyed very much, but I 
think that the drum corps by some of the Confederate veterans was 
the feature of the evening. 

The St. Mary's Orchestra, under the direction of Miss Hull, accom- 
panied Mrs. McKimmon and Mrs. Dowell in their solos, and also the 
other singers. 

"Exams." 

Examinations reigned supreme at St. Mary's for one long, dreadful 
week, and were the source of many groans and deep sighs. How 
thankful we are that they come but twice a year. 

Reception to the Legislature. 
On Monday evening, February first, the school gave its usual recep- 
tion to the members of the Legislature. The hall and parlor were 



172 The St. Mary's Muse. 



decorated simply, but with taste — quantities of Southern smilax being 
used, with masses of ferns, and bowls of bright carnations. 

In the receiving line were Bishop Cheshire, Mr. and Mrs. Lay, Dr. 
and Mrs. Kemp Battle, Mr. Bichard Battle, and Mrs. Ed. Battle, Miss 
Thomas, Miss Lee, Miss Fenner, Miss Dowd, Mr. Stone and Mr. Cruik- 
shank. Refreshments were served, and during the evening there was 
music that was much enjoyed, rendered by the members of the Music 
Faculty. 

It was much regretted that so few of the gentlemen of the Legislature 
were present, but the evening was a very pleasant one, nevertheless. 

Basketball Match Game. 

On the 29th of January the second match game of basketball was 
played between the teams of the Atalanta and Olympian Clubs. It 
was a hard-fought, snappy game, resulting in a score of 10-8 in favor 
of the Atalantas. The Olympians led at first, making two goals before 
the Atalantans scored. Then Esther Rembert made three goals in quick 
succession for her side, and the Atalantans held the lead for the rest of 
the game. 

The game showed some very fine playing on both sides. Esther Rem- 
bert's goal throwing was perhaps the most notable feature. The guard- 
ing of Janie Patrick and Virginia Prettyman was strong, and there was 
effective and rapid team work on both sides. 

The line-up was as follows : 

Olympia. Atalanta. 

Lewis Center Harrison, A. X. 

Rogers Right Forward Rembert 

Slocomb Left Forward Gales 

Bourne Right Guard Fairley, G. 

Prettyman Left Guard Patrick 



School Notes. 



A few of the St. Mary's girls went to see Annie Russell in "The 
Stronger Sex." 

Rebe Shields enjoyed a visit from her uncle during the inauguration 
week. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 173 

Some of the girls went to the inaugural reception, and in spite of 
the great crush enjoyed it thoroughly. 

Everybody is looking forward with much pleasure to the concert 
to be given by David Bispham in the St. Mary's auditorium. 

Isabel Perry is fortunate enough to have her brother up here at the 
Legislature. 

A large number of the girls took advantage of the opportunity to 
hear Mile. Calve, and were well repaid. 

Lucy Dortch's father was here for the inauguration. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lay went to Chapel Hill the last part of January, 
where they attended the celebration in honor of Lee. President Wood- 
row Wilson, of Princeton, was the speaker of the day. 

Janie Jones was made happy by a visit from her father. 

Eliza Morton has been enjoying life since the Legislature opened, as 
her entire family is now in Raleigh, and she has spent much time with 
them. 

We regret to say that Rebe Shields has gone home for a week or two 
on account of ill health. We hope very much that she will regain her 
strength as quickly as possible and take her place among us once more. 

Tissie Harrison's father is a member of the Legislature, and she is 
fortunate in seeing him often. 

Hallie Carrison enjoyed a visit from her brother not long ago. 

On the afternoon of the nineteenth special exercises were held in 
the parlor to honor the birthday of Lee. 

We are glad to welcome three new day scholars, May Wood, Kittie 
and Bettie Buffalo, among our number, and Margaret Jarrett and 
Elizabeth Boyd among the home girls. 

We are glad to note the return of an "old girl," Grace Deaton, who, 
on account of ill health, was not able to take her place among us at the 
beginning of the year. 

Mary Rawls Gilliam was made happy by a visit from her uncle, and 
enjoyed several trips down town with him, and a driving party, made 
up of Miss Sutton and about a dozen girls. 



174 The St. Mary's Muse. 



On the thirtieth of January Mr. Harper, of the Raleigh Graded 
Schools, gave an interesting talk in the auditorium about the Yellow- 
stone National Park. He showed fine stereopticon views to illustrate 
his descriptions, and the evening was greatly enjoyed. 

Miss Coletrain, of Randolph-Macon, has been a guest at St. Mary's 
for several days. 

Interest in athletics has been increasing, now that examinations are 
over, and there will soon be a third great match game between the two 
rival teams, which we hope the entire school will attend and help the 
players with their enthusiasm. We print elsewhere an account of the 
game played on the 29th. 

On Wednesday night, January 27th, the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary 
Society held special exercises, which were open to every one, in honor 
of Poe's centennial. The meeting was very interesting and every one 
enjoyed the reading of some of Poe's poems as well as the excellent 
criticisms upon his life and work. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mai'y's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. ealeigh, n. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1908-'09. 
Mary Campbell Shuford, Editor in Chief. 
Ida Jean Rogerson, Business Manager. 

S^SS, } News Editors. HSftSS?* } "*«* Editors. 

Paula Hazard, Annie C. Wood, Associate Editors. 
Mary Ruth Marre, Assistant Editor. 
Laura Meares, Exchange Editor. 
Frances Bottom, Assistant Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL. 



Examinations. 



The much dreaded time of examination week has at last been en- 
dured, and now every one feels free to draw a deep breath and start 
out on the second half-year with good resolutions of study and hard 
work. Let us all see how much we can really accomplish during the 
new term, remembering that the prime object in school is to learn, and 
realizing that no matter how important the social or athletic side of 
school life may be, the fundamental reason why we are at St. Mary's 
is to become well informed, and this can only be accomplished by taking 
advantage of the daily chance which we are afforded in the classrooms. 



Wasted Time. 



I wonder if we ever realize how small a portion of our time we really 
use at school. And yet the same old cry is always heard — "But I 
haven't got time to do that." The trouble is that w T e waste half the 
time we have in getting ready and preparing to begin the task to be 



176 The St. Mary's Muse. 



accomplished ; and that when we really finish the lingering anticipation 
of the work and get down to the real grind, we find that half of the 
period has already flown. If we would only go into everything — from 
English to dancing — with vim and interest to help us along, and carry 
us through quickly, both working hard and playing hard, we would find 
at the end of the year that we had gained a great deal, both in educa- 
tion and in pleasant memories. 



Exchanges. 



The Mtjse would acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the follow- 
ing exchanges in January : 

The Acorn, the Athenian, Alabama Brenau Journal, Chatterbox, 
Concept, Erskinian, Georgian, Clinton Hustler, Guilford Collegian, 
Raleigh High School Enterprise, Flushing High School Folio, Horn 
Scholastics, Isaqueena, Lenoirian, MerceHan, Durham High School 
Messenger, Monthly Chronicle of the Episcopal High School, 'Newberry 
Stylus, Duval High School Oracle, Palmetto, Pine and Thistle, Ra- 
diant, Red and White, State Normal Magazine, Stetson Weekly Colle- 
giate, University of North Carolina Magazine, University of Utah 
Chronicle, Wesleyan, Winthrop College Journal. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN. 



In Chapel. 
The A. & M. boys once sang so loud that the thunder up in a thunder 
cloud said: "Well, if / can't be heard, why then, I'll never, never, 
thunder again." F. B. 



School Days. 

School days, school days ! 
Dark and gloomy rule days. 
Demerits, restrictions and awful marks 
If any one even dreams of larks. 
Even to err one single day, 
Or break a rule in the slightest way, 
Is thought disgraceful by Mr. Laj', 
And ditto the teachers in school. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 177 

School days, school days! 
Happy and glorious school days. 
Laughter and jesting and jollity, 
Everything just as it ought to be. 
Forgetting exams, and other woes, 
Nobody cares how little she knows, 
She puts on a smile and away she goes — 

To-morrow '11 take care of itself. Mildred Borden. 

M. B. Sprtjill. 

Exams. 
I fear thee dreadfully, exams., 

I fear the marks I'll get, 
For thou art tiresome, long and hard — 
I'll flunk on you, I bet. 

I fear thee and my bad report ; 

What will my mother say? 
"Fear not, fear not, thou silly girl, 

For idling 'tis thy pay." 

Alone, alone, all, all alone, 

The only one who'll fail ; 
And never a teacher will feel a pang 

When she hears my plaintive wail. 

The many marks so beautiful 

That other girls will see; 
But a thousand thousand zeros there 

Will be in store for me. 

I'll look upon my paper, oh ! 

And then draw eyes away, 
While thinking bitterly of the marks 

That'll go to my home some day H. Carrison. 

Clippings. 
'Twas Catherine Mary once, we guess, 

Though now 'tis Kathryn Mae, 
Still thys ys no one's busyness 

If she lykes yt that wae. 



Lives of flunkers all remind us, 
We can throw a bluff as far, 

And, departing, leave behind us, 
Goose eggs on the registrar. 



He writeth best who stealeth best 
Ideas, both great and small ; 

For the great soul who wrote them first 
From nature stole them all. 



178 The St. Maby's Muse. 

"Handsome" and "gallant" and "brave" and "bold, 

These in the long ago, 
Were words the gushing schoolgirl used 

With which to describe her beau. 
Times now have changed, as you know times will, 

Her meaning is absolute, 
You question not to hear her say: 

"Look ! don't you think he's 'cute' ?" 



O, wa'd some pow'r the giftie gie us, 
To see some folks before they see us, 
It wa'd from hands of torture free us, 
In this vale below. 

For we could to jungles hie us 
Where these bores might never spy us- 
Rather have the wild beasts nigh us 
Than some folks we know. 



SUMMER. 
They stood beneath a spreading tree 

And talked as lovers should, 
And then to seal the compact, he 

Cut "Mabel" on the wood. 

AUTUMN. 

Now back to town they both have strayed; 

One day they chanced to meet, 
And then and there that selfsame maid 

Cut "Charlie" on the street. 



Vegetable Courtship. 
A potato went out on a mash, 

And sought an onion bed. 
"That's pie for me," observed the squash, 

And all the beets turned red. 
"Go away," the onion weepingly cried; 

"Your love I can not be: 
The pumpkin is your lawful bride — 

You cantaloupe with me." 
"Ah, spare me a cress," the tuber prayed, 

"My cherry-iehed bride you'll be. 
You are the only weeping maid 

That's currant now with me." 
And as the wily tuber spoke, 

He grasped the bashful prize 
And giving her, his peach, a shake, 

Devoured her with his eyes. 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ckuikshank - - - - Alumnte Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumna3 Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
VTPF-PRTi-sTnFNTs J Mrs - l m - p ittenger, Raleigh, 

VICE-.TRESIDE>,TS, < Mrg p , p Tucker R a l e igh, 

[ Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL. 



Our pages, usually devoted to "Alumnae Matters," speak for them- 
selves of the dearth this month of news which the Muse considers would 
he of interest to the Alumnae. At the risk of appearing querulous, or 
at least monotonous, we again appeal to our Alumnae and urge them 
to let us have news of them. The news that we get of them through 
the daily papers is very meager, and lacks entirely any touch of per- 
sonal feeling; the reports we get through others is haphazard and un- 
certain. May we not have letters, personal or open letters, to the 
Muse that will give us whatever of news you have to give of yourselves 
or of others who are close to us, and suggestions as to our conduct of 
the Muse, and particularly as to this department ? 



Alumnae Notes. 



Mrs. Bancker Smedes (nee Lily Hicks), of New York, was a wel- 
come visitor to St. Mary's during January. 

Cards have been received for the wedding of Miss Frances Jones, of 
Raleigh, to Mr. Alfred Bauman, of Raleigh, which will take place on 
the 10th of February. 

Miss Minea, and Miss Anna Minea were Mrs. Lay's guests at lun- 
cheon recentlv. It is interesting to know that the Misses Minea were 



180 The St. Maey's Muse. 



at one time teachers in Madame Clement's school in Germantown. 
They are in Raleigh for the first time, and are guests at Dr. Hawkins's. 



We were very glad to know that Sadiebelle McGwigan was able to go 
back to the Woman's College, Richmond, this year to graduate, and we 
are still more glad to note from the first copy of the Chisel (December) 
what a prominent part she is taking in the affairs of the college this 
final year. She is Editor-in-Chief of the Chisel, the student magazine, 
President of the Y. W. C. A., and Vice-President of the Literary So- 
ciety of the Senior Class, and of the Missionary Society. 



The fall number of the Chronicle, published by St. Paul's School, 
Beaufort, contains a list of the Faculty, shows apparently only two St. 
Mary's girls connected with the active teaching force this session. Miss 
Ella Davis continues in charge of the fifth and sixth grades, and Miss 
Mary Lassiter ('06), of Hertford, has charge of the Music Depart- 
ment. "Mary Lassiter" made quite a record at St. Mary's in music, 
taking the certificate in 1905, the year before her graduation from the 
college. Since graduation she has been teaching in the Courtland High 
School, Courtland, Va. The health of Mrs. Geffroy, the Secretary- 
Treasurer and directing genius of the school, has been very poor for 
the past two years, to the great regret of her many friends, but the 
school seems to be flourishing. 



From Florence, S. C, Miss Mary E. Tarrh writes us (not for pub- 
lication) of the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Douglas, of that 
town. She says : "I am sending you a clipping from the Columbia 
State of yesterday (January 24). It has in it the account of the gol- 
den w T edding of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas. The latter went to St. Mary's 
in its early days when she was only nine years old. I think in the 
old ante-bellum times small children were put at St. Mary's, lacking 
paternal care — different from the custom of to-day. The little girl in 
question was named Mary Caroline Coggeshell and familiarly known as 
Carrie. I think she must be among the oldest of the alumna?. On 
the reverse side of the Florence article there is one about Cheraw men- 
tioning some of your acquaintances." The Cheraw article contains no- 
tices of Miss Ellen Duvall's "progressive puzzle party," given in honor 



The St. Maey's Muse. 181 

of Mrs. A. S. Thomas (Emily Garrison) and Miss Henrietta Kollock, 
and of the luncheon given by Miss Godfrey in compliment to Miss Kol- 
lock, of Charleston, "who is the attractive guest of Miss Elizabeth Wad- 
dill." 



Miss Helen Liddell, of Charlotte, writes interestingly (December 27) 
of the Charlotte girls : "I am going to tell you what I can a^out the 
"Old Girls" here, although perhaps you already know as much as I can 
tell you. If you don't, you may be surprised to see how many of them 
are teaching. 

"Marguerite and Blandina Springs, Leonore Seay and Alice Moore 
all teach in the public schools. Marguerite has the third grade and 
Blandina the second or third. Leonore teaches the fourth grade and 
has gained quite a reputation as a teacher. This is only her second 
year, but she is considered one of the best teachers in the schools. Alice 
Moore has a second grade. 

"Lula Taliaferro is 'doing society' this winter and making quite a 
success of it, as she is just as sweet, pretty, and attractive as a society 
girl should be. Sadie Thomas has been devoting all of her attention 
toward Florence's wedding, which will take place the first of the week, 
and when Sadie will, of course, be 'maid of honor.' Annie Louise Hutch- 
ison is in Washington at school, at Fairmont Seminary, I think. Susan 
Bynum, her mother and sister are spending the winter in Charlotte 
with her grandfather, Judge Bynum. Susan has been visiting Mary 
Wiggins and Marguerite Thompson for the past few weeks. 

"Laura Baker (Mrs. Richardson) lives just across the street from us, 
so we see her quite often. Every one here seems to like her very much, 
and Alice Spruill (Mrs. Alexander) has also been very popular since 
she has been in Charlotte. 

"As for me, I am still very much interested in my kindergarten work, 
and had hoped to finish the course this year, but an unfortunate attack 
of grippe has caused me to lose a lot of time, and now the doctor insists 
that I must be out of school for about a month after the holidays are 
over, so I don't know when I shall get it done. 

"Please tell the Muse editors, for me, that I wish them the greatest 



182 The St. Mary's Muse, 



success for the coming year and that I am going to send in my sub- 
scription to the monthly. Remember me, please, to all my friends at 
St, Mary's. With the best of new year's wishes for you and for St. 
Mary's, I am, 

"Sincerely, Helen Katherijste Liddeel."" 



THOMAS-CARRISON. 

oSTo marriage of recent months has been of more interest to the St. 
Mary's of the present and to the younger Alumnae than that of Miss 
Emily Jordan Garrison, '07, of Camden, S. C, and Rev. Albert S. 
Thomas, of Cheraw, S. C, which was celebrated in Grace Church, Cam- 
den, on the evening of Wednesday, December 17th. 

Miss Carrison, throughout the four years of her St. Mary's course, 
took a prominent part in the school activities and was the salutatorian 
of her class at graduation in May, 1907. She was Business Manager 
of the Muse in her Senior year and has always taken an active interest 
in its welfare. She is a member of the Phi Mu Fraternity. 

Mr. Thomas is a brother of Miss Eleanor Thomas, our Lady- 
Principal, a tie which brings him very close to us. He has been Rector 
of several parishes in South Carolina and has been for some years Sec- 
retary of that Diocese. 

Miss Thomas went to Camden for the wedding, and Hallie Carrison 
was maid of honor for her sister. 

We clip an account of the wedding from the Columbia State: 

"Beauty and i: fe reigned supreme at Grace Episcopal Church Thurs- 
day night when ,\t half -past eight o'clock Miss Emily Jordan Carrison, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Carrison, was married to Rev. Albert 
Sidney Thomas, of Cheraw. The solemn ceremony was performed by 
Rev. W. B. Gordon, Rector of Grace' Church, assisted by Rev. A. R, 
Mitchell, Rector of Christ Church, Greenville. 

"The bride entered with her father, who gave her to be married. The 
maid of honor was Miss Hallie Jordan Carrison, the bride's sister, and 
another sister, Miss Cora ISTesbit Carrison, was the only attending maid. 
The Rev. Harold Thomas, a brother of the groom, attended as best man, 
and Mr. J. W. Thomas, of Columbia, was the groomsman. 



The St. Mary's j\Iuse. 183 

"The bride's wedding gown was exquisite, being of white satin, em- 
pire directoire, trimmed in white chiffon and rose pointed lace. The 
veil was caught with lilies of the valley and the bouquet was a superb 
shower of the same flowers. 

"After the wedding ceremony an elaborate reception was given at the 
home of the bride's parents. 

"Mr. and Mrs. Thomas left on a late train for points south. They 
will make their home in Cher aw." 



ST. MARY'S CHAPEL 

ST. MARY'S SCHOOL, RALEIGH, N. C. 



Order of Services: Lext, 1909. 
Holy Communion: First and third Sundays of the month at 11 a.m. 
Second and fourth Sundays at 7:50 a.m. 

Each day in Holy Week except Good Friday, and Monday and 
Tuesday of Easter Week at 7 a.m. 
Mondays : . . . . Shortened Morning Prayer at 8:05; Shortened Evening Prayer 
at 6:35. 
. Shortened Morning Prayer at 9. 
. Shortened Evening Prayer at 6:35. 



Tuesdays 
Thursday 
Saturdays 



Wednesdays ^ 



3 



Fridays : 
Sundays : 



Litany at 9 a.m. 

Shortened Evening Prayer, with brief address, at 5. 

Regular Services at II a.m. and 5 p.m. 



The subject of the addresses on Wednesday and Friday afternoons will be during 
the first half of Lent, The Christian in His (a) Amusements, (b) Speech, (c) Read- 
ing, (d) Business, (e) Civic Duties, and (f) Example; and during the second half 
of Lent, A Woman's Work in the Church; (a) Parish Visiting and Charity; (b) 
Social Duties in the Congregation; (c) Sunday .School; (d) Altar Guild; (e) Mis- 
sion Work; and (f) Giving. 

Easter Day. 
Holy Communion with full music at 8:00. 

Morning Prayer and Ant C Communion Service, with Sermon, at 11:00. 
Evening Prayer, with Address, at 5 : 00. 



Edwards & Broughton Printing Co., Raleigh, N. C. 



REflD !— MflRK !-0CT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of ihe St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



1 It's worth the difference " 



WHARTON & TYREE 



' ' Workers in Artistic Photography ' 



Sehmile und der worldt schmiles mit you, 

Laugh t und der worldt vill roar; 
Weep und der worldt vill leaf you, 

Und never come pack any more. 
Not all of you couldn't peen handsome, 

Not all of you haf good clothes, 
But a sehmile is not egspensif, 

Und covers a worldt of woes. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRIS! CO. 



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Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
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Underwear, 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



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RALEIGH, N. C. 



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call on local agent, or write 

F. T. RICKS, 
Asst. General Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, H. W. JACKSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, Secretary. 



An aristocratic rooster of Cluster, 
With feathers of luminous luster, 
Remarked, "It is just, 
Man returns to his dust, 
While I evolute to a duster. 



. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

OROCKRS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS BEADY. NO DIET 0E ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

THIRD GENERATION OP SUCCESSFUL 
BANKING. 
All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital, $ 100.000.00 

Surplus, - - lOO.OOO.OO 

Deposits, - 1,175,000.00 

Assets, - 1,500,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchfoed, Cashier 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



Whoever reads this verse 

Will swear ! 
So, conscientious one, 

Beware! 
And if, perchance, you read 

Too far, 
You'll find out what a fool 

You are. 
Still reading! still must you 

Persist, 



Though I have warned you of 

Your risk ? 

Too late ! you've thrown away 

Your time. 

Now hear the purpose of 

My rhyme: 

Since in your brain it finds 

A place, 

" 'Twas written just to fill 

Up space." 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hirgett Streets. 


WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 


ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 


Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 


MISSKS REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 


GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 


J. R. FEURALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 



INSURE IN ThjE 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE 
INSDRANGE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY. 

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW 

Ladies' Furnishings and Novelties. 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing prompily done. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 
COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Candy — China. 

Pictures. Stationery. Toys. 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



When a bit of sunshine hits ye, 

After passing of a cloud; 
When a fit of laughter gits ye, 

And yer spine is feeling proud, 
Don't fergit to up and fling it 

At a soul that's feeling blue, 
For the minit that ye sling it, 

It's a boomerang to you ! 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBBINS' LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

'PHONES 81. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 


J. SCHWARTZ, 
RICHMOND MARKET. 


H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations,Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds. 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 


Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBT. SIMPSON, Drugs TSii e ^iS, etc. 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

Dentist. 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY- 


H. T. HICKS CO. 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, X, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 
Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 
Fkancis P.Venable, Pres., Chapel Hill, N. C. 



School Calendar, 1908-09. 



pebruary 

February 1, Monday, 8:30 p.m. — Eeception to the Governor, Legislature and State 
Officers. 

February 8, Monday, 8 : 30 p.m. — Mr. David Bispham, Baritone. 

February 13, Saturday, 8 p.m. — St. Ethelreda's Chapter: Valentine Party. 

February 15, Monday.- — Seniors entertain the Faculty and Juniors. 

February 18, Tuesday, 8 p.m. — Dr. L. J. Banks on "Bisinya" at the Baptist Uni- 
versity. 

February 20, Saturday, 8 p.m. — St. Margaret's Chapter in "Allene Delusion." 

February 22, Monday. — Washington's Birthday Celebration of the Literary Socie- 
ties. Juniors entertain Seniors. 

February 23, Tuesday, 8 p.m. — Mr. Walter Howe, Dramatic Interpreter. 

February 24. — Ash Wednesday. Holy Day. Lent begins. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited. 

THE MECHANICS SWINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 

Fayetteville Street. 




YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pullen 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cash'r. Capital and Surplu s 
875,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposit s 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 



66th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 17, 1908. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

E ASTER TERM BEGAN JANUARY 21, 1909. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

. i. 1HE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
St. Mary's 

.,,..„ IS. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these 

Departments: f £ THE ART. SCHOOL. 

5. I HE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1908-09 are enrolled 200 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Steinway Grand Pianos. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training. 



For Catalogue and other information address 



Rev. George W. Lay, 

RECTOR. 






. Mary's lift use 



Jfent flumbet 




flDarcb, 100© 



$$M&,WM 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



LENT NUMBER. 



Vol. XIII. March, 1909. No. 7. 



Forty days and forty nights 
Thou wast fasting in the wild; 

Forty days and forty nights 
Tempted, and yet undefiled. 
***** 

So shall we have peace divine; 

Holier gladness ours shall be; 
Round us, too, shall angels shine, 

Such as ministered to Thee. 

Keep, oh, keep us, Saviour dear, 
Ever constant by Thy side; 

That with Thee we may appear 
At the eternal Easter-tide. 



Lent. 

The star of the Nativity grows dim ; the road narrows ; the way dark- 
ens; there come the twilight days of Septuagesima, Sexagesima, Quin- 
quagesima, and the Lenten season is here. Although, because of its 
clearly marked observances, one is wont perhaps to think of this period 
in the church's year as especially isolated and apart from the whole, 
no season has a more gradual preparation or more plainly leads up 
to that which follows. Just as autumn shades into winter so Epiphany 
gives place to Lent. 

The teachings of the three twilight Sundays are successively, self- 
control, self-distrust — reliance upon God — self-knowledge; while the 
beautiful collect for the first day of Lent gives us the aim of the whole 
Lenten season. "Create and make in us new and contrite hearts that 
we, worthily lamenting our sins and acknowledging our wretchedness, 
may obtain of thee, the God of all mercy, perfect remission and for- 



186 The St. Mary's Muse. 

giveness"; this is the daily prayer of Lent. One can see that the col- 
lects throughout the season but treat of different phases of this one 
subject. 

Now that we have entered the portal of Ash Wednesday and are 
passing on toward that other gateway which opens out to the Easter, 
let us go upon the way not altogether thoughtlessly, with merely the 
observances of outward forms, but with some measure of appreciation 
for the season's real meaning. Never let it be forgotten that the value 
of Lent lies not in itself but in the spirit of its keeping. It is no time 
for fasting only — as the word is generally understood — but a period 
for self-denial, an expression of infinitely larger meaning. Lent calls 
for the introspection of self, for the denial of the soul's sins whether 
they be the large ones or the little favorite faults. That which is self- 
denial for one man may not be so for another ; and it is for each one 
to choose that form of self-denial which is best suited to himself. One 
may almost smile and say that such is the continuous duty of the 
Christian. The answer is yes; but, because of human frailty, it is 
needed that a certain definite season be devotee! to the special con- 
sideration of these thoughts. At the same time there must be no 
thought of self-righteousness. The Master bids that our fasting be 
cheerful, our prayers secret. 

It would seem that these days bring us more nearly in touch with 
the life of Christ. The Master's lonely watch upon "the barren steep," 
the bitter temptation that later came have for one who has truly kept 
the Lent something more of meaning than simply a dim, shadowing 
sense of the Christ's sufferings. Then, with Holy Week, comes the 
Passion and the mighty death, from which there is the entrance to 
Eastertide. 

Lent is a somber season, yet to the Christian it is not altogether 
dark. The sadness is there, because we turn to view our sins and to 
see wherein we are weak. This and the memories of those forty days 
of old impart to the season its atmosphere of gloom. Yet by these 
same means Lent is strong to help us, powerful in its opportunities. 
It is rich in hope for the soul. New and contrite hearts is the aim 
for which we are to strive. And, finally, the great watchword of Lent 
is love — love such as is portrayed to us in that wonderful pen picture 



The St. Mary's Muse. 187 



by the master hand of St. Paul. For this it was that Christ came to 
us on earth ; and His mighty love found its culmination in the sacrifice 
on Calvary. Thus Lent may become a season of quiet, sweet and help- 
ful, for Christ Himself meets those who seek Him in the wilderness. 
And for him who has walked in the shadows with his Lord there is a 
wondrous beauty in the dawn. 



The Message of the March) Winds- 



IRMA DEATON. 



ye wild boist'rous March winds, what message do ye bring? 
"We come from far to bring to you a greeting from the Spring. 
We are her trusty messengers that gladly do her will; 
We go to carry tidings o'er valley and o'er hill. 

"Afar beyond the mountains, within a valley fair, 
There dwells the gentle springtime, nor knows a thought of care. 
Soon will she come among you, e'en now she's on her way, 
Borne in her flowing chariot, far brighter than the day. 

"She'll wake to life the flowers, and clothe the world in green, 
And bring to you such gladness as the old year has not seen. 
The song birds shall sing blithely, the earth be fair and bright; 
She shall rule as Queen of Beauty, all things shall feel her might. 

"And now our message given, we hasten on our way, 

To tell to other peoples the tidings of the May; 
To bid the hoary Winter give place to our fair Queen 
Who comes with joy and gladness to clothe the world in green." 



The Fairy CloaK of Flowers. 



PAULA ELIZABETFI HAZARD. 



Once upon a time many long years ago there lived in a beautiful 
kingdom among the mountains King Alvin and Queen Ursula. One 
day a dear little baby girl was given to the king and queen. But the 
joy in the royal palace was soon turned to grief when it became known 
that the queen of the good fairies had not been present at the birth 



188 The St. Mary's Muse. 



of the little princess, and the Queen-mother wept when she heard what 
evil spell the wicked fairies had cast over her baby. For Queen Mi- 
randa, not seeing any good fairies in the room, had touched the baby 
lying in her tiny cradle with her crooked wand, and bending close to 
the princess's little face had said, "Ugly shalt thou be. Thy beauty 
shalt return to thee only if thou can'st get a fairy cloak made of all 
the flowers that grow, and only when thou wearest it shalt thou be 
loved by a prince. Unless by thy eighteenth birthday thou shalt have 
such a cloak then must thou pass completely into my power." Then 
she had given the princess one more touch with her wand and had dis- 
appeared. 

ISTow just after the wicked fairy had begun speaking one of the 
good fairies entered the room and unseen by any one had remained 
behind the cradle. Queen Alixe had been unable to go to the royal 
palace to act as godmother to Princess Stella, but she had sent her 
swiftest messenger, Ariel, to carry to the baby girl all the best wishes 
and gifts of the fairy kingdom. Although Ariel had reached King 
Alvin's palace too late to prevent the wicked fairy queen's doing harm 
to the princess, yet he heard what she said and he knew his queen could 
do something to save the princess. So after hovering lightly above 
the dainty cradle and waving his tiny wand to give sweet dreams to 
the sleeping baby he flew swiftly away to fairyland. 

The fairies had gathered in their favorite spot on the bank of a 
little mountain stream that went tinkling under the trees, and with 
their queen were awaiting the return of Ariel. Queen Alixe was seated 
on a throne of soft green moss, and around her, flitting now here, now 
there, was a host of fairy forms, dancing in the pale moonlight that 
drifted down through the leafy boughs. The air was filled with the 
lazy buzz of insects, and the nodding grasses and flowers along the edge 
of the brooklet were stirred by the gentle breeze. 

"It grows late and still Ariel doth not come. What can be keeping 
him ?" Queen Alixe said. 

As if in answer to her question there was a rustle of wings near at 
hand, and the fairy messenger alighted at her feet. 

"Welcome, Ariel," she said, "tell us of thy journey and of the Prin- 
cess Stella." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 189 

"Alas, Queen," he replied, "I reached the palace too late ! Would 
that thou had'st been there ! The wicked fairy queen hath cast her 
evil spell over the princess, and hath doomed her to grow up ugly, un- 
loved by any prince, and wilt claim her for her own on her eighteenth 
birthday." 

"Alas that Queen Miranda reached the palace before you !" the queen 
exclaimed. "What can we do now that she hath the princess in her 
power ? The wicked fairies are growing so strong that 'tis hard for 
us to outdo them." 

"Despair not, sweet Queen," Ariel answered. "There is a remedy, 
and we can yet defeat Queen Miranda's evil plans. The one thing 
which will make the princess beautiful, give her the love of a prince 
and rescue her from the power of the wicked fairies is a cloak made 
of every flower that grows. But even the cloak will be of no use to 
the princess until her eighteenth birthday. For eighteen years she 
must remain under the evil spell, and if on that day she doth not own 
such a fairy cloak then she must pass entirely into Queen Miranda's 
power." 

"It will indeed be a. hard task," the queen replied, "and the wicked 
fairy queen well knows her power and wilt do all she can to hinder 
us in every possible way. But we will put forth all our strength and 
skill and by working patiently we may succeed. Meanwhile we can 
watch over the little princess and, as far as we are able, guard her 
from harm. We can also be hunting and gathering flower petals for 
the cloak." 

The years passed. In King Alvin's palace the Princess Stella grew 
to girlhood : tall, slender and graceful of form, but ugly of face. Her 
one beauty was her abundant golden-brown hair, so fine and bright 
that it shone in the sunshine like spun gold. She wore her golden locks 
hanging loosely over her shoulders and about her face, thus to hide 
somewhat her ugly features. And so she lived happily in her father's 
palace, and although she often grieved at her lack of beauty, yet she 
was ignorant of the dreadful power under which she lived. Queen 
Ursula would never allow any one to speak before the princess of the 
fate that awaited her, but often did she go off to herself and grieve 
over her child's misfortune. And not knowing that there had been 
2 



190 The St. Maky's Muse. 

any good fairies at the cradle of the princess she had no hope what- 
ever of getting a fairy flower cloak. So the years had slipped quickly 
by until finally the princess's seventeenth birthday had come. 

During all the seventeen years the good fairies had been busy gath- 
ering flowers from all over the world — flowers which were touched 
by the fairy queen's magic wand and kept fresh in the cool waters of 
the little stream. Many a long journey had the fairy messengers 
taken ; many a hard search had they made for rare and tiny flowers. 
Often were they hindered by the wicked fairies, who would at times 
outfly them and destroy the precious blossoms before the messengers 
reached the spots where they grew ; often would the evil sprites whisper 
of far-away dells where grew some rare blossom, and the winged Ariel 
would speed thither only to find the blooms withered or not yet opened. 
But the good fairies had worked on in spite of these troubles, and 
now not long before the great day they had a collection of some of all 
the flowers that grow, except only one, the frail asphodel, that blossom 
that lives but a day. 

Queen Alixe gathered the fairies on the mossy bank of the brooklet 
and there they made ready to pull the petals and weave the cloak of 
many flowers. 

"But, Queen, we have no asphodels to put into the cloak," one of 
the fairies said. 

The queen turned to Ariel. "Speed away, Ariel, swiftest of my 
fairies, to the farthest meadows of the kingdom where grow the frail 
asphodels, and bring hither their blossoms." 

Across land and water, over hill and plain, above mountain and 
valley, past the realm of the wicked fairies, Ariel flew till he came to 
the broad asphodel meadows. Filling his arms full of the dainty blos- 
soms he sped back again to the queen, and alighted before her just as 
the blooms he held were drooping. Queen Alixe touched them with 
her wand and as they freshened up took them from Ariel to put among 
the others. 

Night after night the fairies met in their favorite haunt to weave 
the flower cloak for Princess Stella. In the soft moonlight, or on 
dark nights by the light of their fairy torches, the fireflies, they daintily 
pulled the petals off and formed them into the magic cloak. Oh, the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 191 

many, many flowers they used ; flowers of all colors of the rainbow — - 
roses, violets, poppies, daisies, morning glories, buttercups, lilies of 
the valley, honeysuckle, narcissus, daffodils, crocuses, anemonies, hypa- 
ticas and asphodels. All the flowers that grow were woven into the 
cloak. At last one lovely moonlight night, the night before the prin- 
cess's eighteenth birthday, the flower cloak was finished. There it lay 
spread out on the mossy ground, its many colors gleaming softly in 
the moonbeams — the most beautiful cloak in the world. 

Just then Ariel, who had been to the royal palace, returned and 
joined the fairies eagerly waiting to hear of the princess. 

"A year ago," he told them, "there appeared at the royal court 
Prince Roland, who of all the princes in the world is the handsomest. 
He had heard, he said, of the gentle Princess Stella and had come to 
win her heart and hand. Alas he had failed to hear of her ugliness 
or of the fate she must suffer. The princess would not allow herself 
to appear before any strangers, and so Prince Roland stayed at the 
palace month after month, pleading in vain to see the princess, of 
whom he had heard so much. However, a few days ago, the prince 
caught a glimpse of the princess's face at her window, and he was so 
shocked at its ugliness that immediately all his desire to win her van- 
ished. By this time the princess, who had often seen the prince walk- 
ing around the palace garden, had fallen in love with him. When 
she realized that he had seen her and that if he had loved her before 
he would surely cease to love her now, she was so distressed that the 
next day she left the palace determined to go off and die. In her sor- 
row she took no notice of her way, but wandered on and on, until as 
it began to grow dark she found herself in a strange kingdom. Weary 
from her long journey she sank down on the soft mossy bank of a little 
brook and fell asleep. She lies now on yonder bank within our realm." 

When Ariel ceased speaking the fairies all danced around the flower 
cloak, and Queen Alixe, touching it with her magic wand, said, "Re- 
main ever fresh and fragrant. Restore to Princess Stella her beauty, 
and win for her the love of Prince Roland." 

Then the fairies taking up the cloak of flowers bore it quickly to 
the mound where the princess lay, and hovering above her in the moon- 
light they dropped it lightly upon her. Then afte~ Qvrv Alixe had 



192 The St. Mary's Muse. 



waved the fairy wand over her and claimed her as her godchild, the 
fairies sped swiftly away, leaving the princess quietly sleeping on the 
bank of the silver streamlet. And there early the next morning 
Prince Roland found her, covered with the sweet-scented fairy cloak 
of flowers, and dreaming of far-away fairy asphodel meadows. And 
bending over he gently kissed her golden hair and beautiful face and 
whispered softly, "My princess." 



The Mad March Hare. 



I. 

The mad March Hare has lost his head, 

He pulls his whiskers, bites and leaps; 
He starts to sniff, then blinks instead, 

You'd know him mad the way he peeps. 

II. 

O, mad March Hare, what makes you mad? 

Is it the wind that blows so wild? 
Is it the sunbeams, warm and glad, 

That melt the drifts Jack Frost has piled? 

III. 

No wind disturbs the Hare, nor thought 

Of summer's joys and spring's sweet air; 
He's mad because his carrot short 

Was eaten by Big Brother Hare. 

Virginia Randolph Bulling Pickel. 



The Terms of Truce. 



MARTHA BYRD SPRUILL. 



I. 

The castle had surrendered. After the wild confusion and din of 
battle, solitary and scarred it stood outlined against the sky, where 
the glare of the setting sun cast reflection of the blood shed that day. 
During a fierce struggle the people inside the gray walls had thought, 
"Surrender ! not until the last man falls" ; but gradually they had 
given way to black despair which told them that all was lost, do what 



The St. Mary's Muse. 193 

they would. In this dreadful time all social distinctions were swept 
aside and lords and ladies waited without condescension side by side 
with the lowliest servants, for the announcement of the terms of the 
truce; for the King's proclamation which was to determine their fate. 
Side by side they waited and neither moaned nor cowered, but each 
grimly stood to meet that slow death of imprisonment which he knew 
was to be his portion, bitterly wishing the while that he might have 
died a glorious death in the battle as had so many of his comrades. 

II. 

''The king has declared that the women may leave the castle bearing 
away as much of their treasure as they can carry," had announced the 
herald. Silence for a few seconds as each realized that these awful 
words meant separation ; then a clamor as proud wills and stern self- 
control that had stood the thought of lifelong imprisonment, broke and 
pitiful cries arose at the thought of this separation from those most 
dear on earth. Some of the women were busily hurrying to and fro 
gathering up household goods of all kinds and tying them on their 
shoulders, while others were making no move, determined to meet death 
rather than separation, when they heard one practical, sturdy, little 
woman boldly say to a man who stood with clenched hands beside her, 
"As much as we can carry! Why I can carry you!'' 

III. 

Impatiently the king stamped his foot and demanded haste. Just 
at that moment came filing from the castle such a procession as never 
was seen before. Ladies so delicate that they swooned at the sight of 
a mouse, suddenly grown strong, staggered out of the gates under the 
weight of their tall brothers or husbands, or perhaps their sons or 
fathers. Panting with exhaustion and fear they timorously presented 
themselves before the king, whose impatience gave way to a something 
that made the hard lines of his face relax and made him command, 
while a warm glow spread over his face, that all the people go free. 
Quite a heroine was the little lady who had so cleverly hit upon this 
way to escape from death ; and much were her praises sung as the lib- 
erty bells joyously rang out. 



194 The St. Mary's Muse. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Alice Leigh Hines, Kebe Hill Shields, Editors. 



The Bispharo Song Recital. 



The Bispham recital has been mentioned in two previous issues, as 
an anticipated pleasure, but we feel that even a third time we want 
to speak of it ; this time as a joy that we have experienced and appre- 
ciated to the fullest. 

Mr. Bispham was at his best both in dramatic power and beauty of 
voice. His program, all in English, was of wide range and brought 
out well his humorous and dramatic insight. The accompanist, Mr. 
Harold Osborne Smith, was himself an artist of great ability. 

The auditorium was well filled and the audience was a very enthusi- 
astic one. An informal reception was held in the parlor, after the 
concert, when the patronesses, the faculty and a few guests met Mr. 
Bispham and Mr. Smith. 

Mr. Bispham very generously responded to requests for "Who is 
Sylvia ?" During the concert he gave several encores also, the old 
English favorites, "Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes," "The Pretty, 
Pretty Creature," being among the number. 

PROGRAM. 
I. 

Where'er You Walk ( "Semele" ) Handel 

Behold, Along the Dewy Grass ("The Seasons") Haydn 

The Frost Scene ( "King Arthur" ) Purcell 

Down Among the Dead Men Old Jacobin Song 

Me. Bispham. 

II. 

Edward Loewe 

The Mad Dog ("Vicar of Wakefield") Liza Lehmann 

Ho! Jolly Jenkin, ) .„_ , ... „ ,,. 

mi rr i j o M lvannoe ) Arthur Sullivan 

The Templars Song, j 

Mr. Bispham. 

III. 

Melodrama (Recitation to music) : The Raven (Edgar Allan Poe), 

Music by Arthur Bergh 

Mr. Bispham. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 195 

IV. 

Polonaise, A flat Major Chopin 

Mr. Smith. 

V. 

But Lately in Dance I Embraced Her A. Arensky 

The Pauper's Drive (Noel) Sidney Homer 

Boat Song ( M. J. Moses ) Harriet Ware 

The Ballad of Little Billee (Thackeray) Graham Peel 

The Hanging of Danny Deever (Kipling) Walter Damrosch 

Me. Bispham. 

The patronesses, to whom so much is due for the success of this con- 
cert, were : 

Mrs. Joseph Blount Cheshire. Mrs. William J. Andrews. 

Mrs. George William Lay. Mrs. Charles M. Busbee. 

Mrs. Hubert Royster. Miss Mattie Bailey. 

Mrs. Kemp P. Battle, Jr. Mrs. Richard H. Lewis. 

Mrs. Charles Root. Mrs. A. W. Knox. 

Mrs. Charles E. Johnson. Mrs. R. B. Raney. 

Mrs. A. B. Andrews. Mrs. Charles McKimmon. 

Mrs. T. Palmer Jerman. Mrs. Walter Grimes. 

Mrs. Ashby L. Baker. 

The Senior Class Entertains the Faculty. 
On Monday, January 15th, the Senior class gave a series of delight- 
ful entertainments. In the afternoon, from five to six, they were "at 
home" to the members of the Senior classes of Peace Institute and the 
Baptist University; from eight to ninerthirty they entertained the 
faculty at a valentine party. After all had had fruit punch the faculty 
tried their skill at archery. A large heart was fastened on the wall ; 
this contained a series of concentric hearts which decreased in size 
until they almost reached the vanishing point, and at that point, a tiny 
gilt heart, they aimed. Each archer was generously allowed three 
trials, and they were needed, for in nearly all cases the first two attempts 
consisted in sending the bow in the direction of the wall, but holding 
the arrow firmly in the hand. A large semicircle was formed by guests 
and hostesses, and the last ones to try hoped to profit by the graceless 
examples of their predecessors. But evidently example was no better 
than precept, for the very first one to try, Miss Thomas, was the most 
successful, coming within perhaps two hearts of the center. Miss SuL- 



196 The St. Mary's Muse. 



ton was awarded the booby prize ; she outdistanced all the rest, for her 
arrow went high above the outermost heart and rested in a picture near 
the ceiling. 

After the archery contest the guests were piloted to another large 
heart, a fat one, where they all grasped the ends of ribbons and drew 
out souvenirs. Most of them were valentines, but a few lucky persons 
drew out the symbolic thimble, button and dime. Refreshments were 
served during the archery contest and were delicious. After an even- 
ing of genuine pleasure the guests left at nine-thirty, and made room 
for the closing entertainment. The Juniors were received in the par- 
lor and then escorted to the grill room, where they spent a short but 
happy half-hour. 

Senior Reception. 

A charming and original Valentine party was given by the Seniors 
on the afternoon of the fifteenth to the Senior classes of Baptist Uni- 
versity and Peace Institute. The parlor was attractively decorated with 
trailing bamboo interwoven with garlands of red and white hearts. 
In one corner was a table also festooned in hearts, upon which stood 
the punch bowl. 

The small tables around the room with pencil and paper upon them 
aroused every one's curiosity as to what was going to be done. But 
soon you were given little red hearts for score cards, with the num- 
ber of the table at which you were to start. There were certain let- 
ters at each table and you were to write all the words beginning with 
those letters that you could think of within a given time. Then you 
changed tables, the one having written the most words at each table 
getting a tiny gilt heart on her score card. The letters together made 
the word "Valentine." The young lady who captured the most hearts 
captured also a St. Mary's pennant. Then with much laughing and 
talking the delicious refreshments were thoroughly enjoyed, and after 
more talking the guests reluctantly left this delightful entertainment. 

A. C. W. 

Mr. Harper's Address. 
The pupils and faculty of St. Mary's had the pleasure of being visited 
on Saturday evening, January 30th, by Mr. Harper, of the Raleigh 
High School. He gave a most interesting and instructive address on 



The St. Mart's Muse. 197 

different sections of Montana and Wyoming, particularly Yellowstone 
National Park. His address was illustrated by stereopticon slides of 
the different views of the park. They were very beautiful and people 
would have thought that it was exaggerated had not Mr. Harper as- 
sured us that in some cases the picture actually did not do justice to 
the real, scenes. The hot springs with their exquisite coloring, the 
geysers and the great archway were the most impressive views. These 
views almost seemed to make one feel as if he were really in the 
midst of their wonderful beauty. We thank Mr. Harper very much 
for giving us such an instructive and pleasant evening, for we were 
truly sorry when the address was closed. E. B. 

Elizabetb Thompson Entertains. 

Elizabeth Thompson entertained a number of St. Mary's girls at a 
party on the day before St. Valentine's. The valentine idea was car- 
ried out in the decorations and refreshments. The score cards were 
little Cupids on a big red satin heart. Hearts was played and Miss 
Sue Kitchin was the lucky winner of the first prize. Susie Everett 
cut the consolation, a heart-shaped bag of candy. The rooms where 
the game was played were beautifully decorated. On the mantels 
and cabinets there were vases of red carnations and tapers shaded in 
red. Festoons of red hearts were on the curtains and around the room. 
At the conclusion of the game delicious refreshments were served. The 
biscuits, sandwichs and cakes were all heart-shaped and the St. Mary's 
girls appreciated the refreshments to the fullest extent and it never 
could be said that they did not show their appreciation. 

Miss Thompson proved a delightful hostess and was assisted by her 
sisters, Misses Daisy and Lillian Thompson, and Miss Anne McKim- 
mon. P. M. 0. 

Eleanor Mann's Party. 

On Wednesday night, when we went in to get our mail, about fifteen 
of us girls found we had invitations to go to Eleanor Mann's to a Val- 
entine party, which was given in honor of Miss Sue Kitchin. We 
were of course all very excited. At last the night came and we all 
went down on the car. The house was beautifully decorated with hun- 
dreds of red hearts, carnations and ferns. We played hearts and had 

3 



198 The St. Maey's Muse. 



beautiful little hand-painted score cards with Cupids on them. Miss 
Kitchin won the first prize, a beautiful heart-shaped box of candy. 
Two of our St, Mary's girls cut for the other prize, Laura Griffith 
being the fortunate winner of a dozen red carnations. Delicious re- 
freshments were served and all too soon Mr. Cruikshank came after 
us and we had to come back to school. We had the "time of our lives." 
Those who were fortunate enough to get invitations were: Lila Jus- 
tice, Janie Patrick, Francis Loomis, Virginia Prettyman, Janie Sims, 
Eliza Morton, Exum Meares, Laura Griffith, Laura Hales, Margaret 
Erwin, Lucy Dortch, Katherine Fairley, Susie Everett, Amelia Stur- 
geon and Caroline Jones. C. Jones. 
Washington's Birthday Exercises. 

There was a joint meeting of the two literary societies held in the 
auditorium Monday evening, February 22d, to commemorate Wash- 
ington's birthday. The exercises commenced with the national hymn, 
"The Star-spangled Banner." After this Mr. Stone introduced the 
speaker, Senator Kluttz, from Salisbury. Mr. Kluttz humanized 
Washington for us and gave us a most interesting talk, not about his 
great triumphs as a general, but about more personal things: Wash- 
ington's outbursts of temper ; Washington in love, and Washington 
as a devoted son and husband. We enjoyed having this human side 
of Washington revealed to us instead of the usual idealized great gen- 
eral, hero and the boy who never told a lie that is the theme of most 
addresses. To know he had little weaknesses makes him more lovable 
as a hero. The exercises were closed by a song, "Washington," which 
was followed by the "Old North State." 

Mr. r|owe. 

On Tuesday evening, February 23d, Mr. Walter Howe, dramatic 
interpreter, gave a concert in the auditorium. Most of the girls were 
present and a few outsiders. Those who heard Mr. Howe last year 
were so pleased with him that they were delighted at his return. The 
whole program was given in his usual charming and delightful style. 
He seemed so perfectly at home and told us some very amusing anec- 
dotes about actors and their odd experiences. He was especially good 
as "Richard III," and his interpretation of the "Matinee girl," as pic- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 199 

tured in "Heard on the Elevator," was very amusing to such a fem- 
inine audience, as it was an exceedingly good hit and very true to life. 
At the request of a number of those who heard him last year he re- 
peated "The Knight and the Lady," better known to St. Mary's girls 
as "Lady Jane," who "was tall and slim." Indeed the whole program 

was thoroughly enjoyed. 

PROGRAM. 

The Enchanted Shirt John Hay 

As to Pop Anon 

The Dream of Eugene Aram Hood 

A Similar Case Anon 

Geese Anon 

INTERVAL. 

Scene from "The School of Scandal" Sheridan 

Act I, Richard III Shakespeare 

Heard on the Elevator Blanche Goodman 

The Thursday Recitals 
The Thursday afternoon recitals given by the pupils of the music 
department are being continued, and the girls are showing some good 
results from their training. The violin pupils are appearing more 
frequently now, and as nearly all of them are beginners they deserve 
special mention. The programs of the last three recitals are given: 

DECEMBER 17th. 

Rondoletto Burgmuller 

Edna Mann. 

Butterfly Merkel 

Lucy Harrison. 

Romance Bloch 

Rebecca Ellet. 

Swallows Cowen 

Lillias Pratt. 

Study Heller 

Katherine Overman. 

When Daffodils Unfold Kevin 

Dorothy Eldredge. 

Ballet — Aragonaise from the "Cid" Massenet 

Elisabeth Holt. 

Winter's Lullaby DeKoven 

Lila Justice. 

Concerto Xo. II ( Violin ) Scitz 

Browning Adicks. 
Chorus — Holy Night Haydn 



200 The St. Mary's Muse. 



JANUARY 28th. 

Study Concone 

Anne McKimmon. 

Stiowflake's Mission Douglas 

Lorna Hales. 

Hunting Song "I Turner 

Venenata, j Merkel 

Minnie Hazard. 

In the Woods Virgil 

Ellen Lay. 

I'hyllis Waltz , Broun 

Lucy Mann. 

Summer Licfoner 

Janie Sims. 

Minuet for the left hand Rheiriberger 

Henrietta Schwartz. 

Were My Song With Wings Provided Hahn 

Hallie Carrison. 

Russian Romance Friml 

Ruth McNaughton. 

Minuet Grieg 

Lorna Hales. 

Nocturne in A Leschetizsky 

Frankie Self. 

Sonata in C Mozart 

Mary Gladstone. 
Mendelssohn, Op. 72, No. 4. 

Vernon Holloway. 

FEBRUARY 18th. 

Slumber Song (Violin) Schill 

Henrietta Russell. 
Mazurka Godard 

ESTELLE EGERTON. 

A Valentine Jessie Gaynor 

Bessie Arthur. 

A Tale (Violin) Block 

George Lay. 
Scherzo B Schubert 

Helen Robinson. 
Cavatina ( Violin ) Reinecke 

Rebecca Ellet. 

Rustic Revels Gurlitt 

Cora Bryan. 
Theme with Variations (Violin) Papini 

Frank Proctor. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 201 

Clementi Sonata Op. 20. 

Larghetto. 

Rondo. 

Mary M. Chamberlain. 

Shake Hands Orth 

Margaret Mann. 

Valse Dennee 

Laura Griffith. 

Spanish Dance Bohm 

Lena Taylor. 

The Lark Rossini 

Chorus. 

Aline's Dilemma. 

On the evening of February 20th St. Margaret's Chapter presented 
"Aline's Dilemma." "Alice in Wonderland" nearly spoiled the girls, 
and nowadays they expect a great deal, yet "Aline's Dilemma" was a 
decided success and a surprise. 

We've heard Alice Hines propound her religious views before but 
it surprised us all to find that as "Mrs. Montressor" she dared openly 
declare herself a Hindoo Theosophist. Trances Loomis was her very 
own self, "Madame Bogusky," a lesser Llama of the inner cult of 
Theosophists ; it was a joy to us all that she so perfectly identified 
her own personality with that of Madame Bogusky. Mrs. Montressor's 
daughters, Enid and Doris, were truly worthy of her ; but let us all 
rejoice that Irene JSTickerson is not so awfully serious and conscientious 
as was Enid, and that Eva Crowell is not always so sentimental as the 
very pretty Doris. Passie May Ottley never did herself more credit 
than she did as Gladys Gadabout. Are all Radcliffe seniors as charm- 
ing ? And last but not least comes "Aline O'Rourke," an Irish maid 
who would be French. It was a case of Mary Owen's being Irish, and 
speaking French as if it were Spanish. "Aline" was fine, but, really, 
she should have brought out her Jack for inspection. 

No one was the star because, you see, it was an "all-star cast !" 

F. Bottum. 

Between the acts the girls in Miss Cribb's dormitory sang a number 
of songs which were greatly enjoyed. Among them were : "Old Black 
Joe," "I Don't Like Your Family," and the "Turkey Feast." Some 
of the singers took bass and tenor parts which added a great deal to the 
effect. 



202 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Valentine Party. 
On February 13th St. Etkelreda's Chapter gave a most entertaining 
Valentine party. The parlor was beautifully decorated with strings 
of red hearts suspended between the chandeliers and large red hearts 
on the window curtains. At the door was the candy booth, and in one 
corner the post-office where you could buy and send valentines to your 
various friends and mashes. There was also a magic mirror in which 
you could see your future husband and a large red heart where you 
were to try to pin an arrow in the center. The lucky person who came 
nearest to the center received a box of candy for her efforts. The pro- 
gram for the evening was a most delightful one. First was the March 
of the Year. The girls were dressed in fancy costume to represent 
the different holidays and seasons of the year. "The New Year," Lilian 
Yates; "Cupid," Esther Rembert; "April Fool," Marie Thomas; 
"Easter," Lena Everett ; "May Queen," Helen Robinson ; "June 
Bride," Bessie Arthur ; "Fourth of July," Ila Rountree ; "Hallowe'en," 
Janie DuBose ; "Thanksgiving," Mary Bourne ; "Christmas," Rebecca 
Wood ; "Father Time," Laura Meares. There were two solos by Miss 
Gould and a delightful selection on the cello by Miss Luney. The 
evening passed in much merriment and was thoroughly enjoyed by 
all who attended. W. Stone. 



School Notes. 



Several of the girls have enjoyed seeing their relatives during the 
month. Sallie Haywood Battle had a visit from her mother and uncle, 
while Dorothy and Mildred Harman were made happy by having 
their mother with them for several days, and Harriet Benedict's aunt 
spent some time with her. Janie Jones was also lucky in having a 
surprise visit from her father. 

Rebe Shields returned to school on the 8th after a two weeks absence, 
and we are very glad to welcome her back and to know that she is quite 
well again. 

Miss Cora Carrison, of Camden, visited her sister, Hallie Garrison, 
on her way to Norfolk, where she was to be present for the battleship 
review. 



Tpie St. Mary's Muse. 203 

It is with deep regret, felt by each and every one, that we mention 
that Amelia Sturgeon has returned home to stay for the rest of the 
year. 

Alice Noble enjoyed taking Miss Cribbs to Chapel Hill with her 
for several days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lay have been in Baltimore for several weeks. The 
latter part of their visit was saddened by the death of Mr. Lay's 
mother. The bereaved ones have the school's tenderest sympathy. 

Several of the girls went to the lecture on "The Oldest City in the 
World," by Mr. Banks, at the Baptist University. The lecture with 
the stereopticon views was both interesting and instructive. Mr. 
Banks, an archaeologist, represents the University of Chicago in these 
excavations at Bismya, the oldest city. 

We are sorry to note that some of our girls have been saddened by 
the death of relatives during the past month. Elizabeth Holt was 
called home for a few days by the death of her aunt, and we also sym- 
pathize with Glen and Katharine Fairly in the loss of their aunt. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription. One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigd, 
N. C, in I be interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 190S-'09. 

Mary Campbell Shuford, Editor in Chief. 

Ida Jean Rogerson, Business Manager. 

Rebe IIill Shields, ) ,,,„„ Mi4 „.„ Minnie Hazard,) tw „„ „„ -,, ,,;+„,.„ 

Alice Leigh Hikes, j News Edl t° r s. Lena EveketT] '} Literary Editors. 

Paula Hazard, Annie C. Wood, Associate Editors. 
Mary Ruth Mardke, Assistant Editor. 
Laura Meares, Exchange Editor. 
Frances Bottum, As-sistant Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL. 



Ta^mg arj Inventory. 



Just as a merchant, at the beginning of the new year, takes an in- 
ventory of all his stock and finds out where he stands in the business 
world and how much he is really worth, so during this quiet Lenten 
season should not each one of us, students at St. Mary's, realize the 
necessity of self-examination to determine exactly how far our ad- 
vance has been made in the struggle for self-mastery ? For how many 
of us have any idea of how much we are really worth ? of what are our 
assets and what our deficiencies ? or what quality — self-control, energy, 
patience or vigor — we need to obtain more of to meet the demand in 
the market of our daily lives. It seems incredible that one should not 
really know or understand the character and personality that is with one 
constantly — the personage that is one's self. And yet how many of 
our faults and failings do we realize and strive to overcome. Practice 
has infinitely more value in influencing others than precept, and we 
should keep this in mind when condemning and judging other people 
rather than ourselves. 



The St. Mary's Muse, 20* 



Thought- 



As the Lenten season is essentially the season for the acquirement 
of self-knowledge, so it is the season wherein we have the opportunity 
to acquire and practice that most valuable of all things — the art of 
thinking. Nothing, however small, that was really worth while or 
was in any degree high or noble has been accomplished without earnest, 
deep and concentrated thought. All the men who have left their mark 
on the world, all the great scientists, men of letters, rulers and states- 
men, have been men of great thinking capacity, and through their 
thought have done so much to enlighten and unlift the world. So let 
us try to concentrate our minds and really think about our daily lessons 
■and our written tasks, instead of performing them in a half-hearted, 
mechanical manner as many of us do, merely to get them done. 



IN MESVIORIAM 



Entered Into Rest, Feb. 25, 1909, Ellen Collins 



THE PASSING OF ANOTHER "LANDMARK." 



When on February 25th Ellen Collins passed into the spirit world 
another "landmark" was removed from St. Mary's. 

Coming to St. Mary's in the 80's "Ellen" worked faithfully, first 
as dining room servant, afterwards as cook, until May, 1908, when she 
was obliged to leave on account of her health. 

The news of "Aunt Ellen's" death will be heard with regret by 
hundreds of "St. Mary girls," to all of whom she was ever polite and 
accommodating. 

Ellen was a "darkey" of the old times : simple, faithful and devoted 
to her friends. She tried to show, by loyal service, her gratitude to 
"Mr. Smedes" and "Miss Etta" for their unfailing kindness to her 
and her children. 

To the writer of this tribute, "the oldest landmark," she was a 
faithful friend whose kindnesses will always be gratefully remembered. 

K. McK. 



206 The St. Mary's Muse. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN. 



Af termath. 
Your head is a bubble, your brains are all gone; 
With such infinite pains have you figured and drawn, 
That you haven't the sense with which you were born — after math. 

You've solved propositions and problems galore, 
You've worried and worked till your head is quite sore. 
You've thought so hard you can think no more — after math. 

The simplest words have lost their meaning, 

You've given your mind such a sweeping and cleaning 

There's no sense left for another gleaning — after math. 

K. Wood. 



The Bell. 
Solemnly, mournfully, 

Dealing its dole, 
The ten-o'clock bell 

Is beginning to toll. 

Go to your slumbers, 

Put out the light — 
Study comes with the morning 

And rest with the night. 

Dark grow the buildings, 
And quenched is the heat, 

Sound fades into silence, 
All footsteps retreat. 

Voices in the chambers, 
No sound in the hall; 

Sleep and oblivion 
Reigning o'er all. 



Nannie Lee. 



Wisdom. 
If we but knew 

The living principle that surges through 
The quiet budding of a single leaf, 
The course from planted grain to ripened sheaf; 
We'd know the secret, so the poets say, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 207 

Of life and death, of midnight and of day. 
I doubt their word and yet it might be true, 
If we but knew. 

But could I guess 

The next fool feature of a woman's dress, 
The next new style of collar or of hat, 
Or when she'll learn to live without a rat, 
When she'll conform to nature's simplest laws, 
Or give some other reason than "because," 
Her rivals praise, her own defects confess, 
Could I but guess; 

And could I tell 

Why boys persist in being mean as — well, 

I hesitate to use the word that rhymes — 

But could I tell the many thousand times 

A boy will move and squirm at Sunday School, 

Or puzzle you by asking questions fool, 

And strive in mischief others to excel, 

Could I but tell; 

Could I surmise 

When politics will flourish without lies, 
When babies have no more the stomach-ache, 
Or men excuses never more will make, 
And old maids be no longer sensitive; 
I'd know enough; I'd need no longer live; 
I'd know all things on earth or in the skies, 
I'd be so wise. 

S. in Trinity Archive. 



AdhesioQ 
Oh! prim little postage stamp, "holding your own," 

In a manner so winning and gentle; 
That you're "stuck on" your task is easily shown, 

And yet you're not two-cent-imental. 
I have noted with pride that through thick and through thin 

You cling to a thing till you do it, 
And, whatever your aim, you are certain to win 

Because you seem bound to stick to it. 

Sometimes when I feel just like shirking a task, 

Or "chucking" the work I'm pursuing, 
I recall your stick-to-it-ive-ness and I ask, 



208 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"Would a postage stamp do as I'm doing?" 
Then I turn to whatever my hands are about 

And with fortified purpose renew it, 
And the end soon encompass for which I set out, 

If only like you, I stick to it. 

G. C. H. in William Jewell Student (Mercerian), 

felis et Muses. 

Felis sedit by a hole; 
Intenta she, cum omne soul, 

Frendere rats; 
Mice cucurierunt trans the floor, 
In numero, duo, tuo, or more, 

Obliti cats. 

Felis saw them oculis; 

"I'll have them," inquit she, "I guess, 

Dum ludunt"; 
Tunc ilia crepit toward the group — 
"Habeam," dixit, "good rat soup; 

Pingues sunt!" 

Mice continued all ludere; 
Intenti they in ludum Nere, 

Gaudenter ; 
Tunc rushed the felis into them, 
Et tore them omnes, limb from lib, 

Violenter. 

MORAL. 

Muses, omnes, now beware! 
Of hungry felis have a care, 

Nox et die; 
Si hoc facis "Neobum rat"; 
Avoid a huge and hungry cat, 

Studiose! 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 

Erxest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnee Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnse Association. 

President, - - Mr*. Mary Iredell. Raleigh. 

[Mrs. M.T. Leak, Durham. 
VTrF-PitFSTnFNTs J Mrs - '■ M - P«M«*nK«\ Raleigh, 

\ZCK-f RESIDENTS, i M| , R y p_ Tll( . k(J| . R u | e j(,|„ 

[.Mrs. Kaiede K. Meaivs, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, .St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL. 



The New Buildings: A Step forward. 



On the twenty-fifth of February ground was broken for the new build- 
ings. Since that date, with favorable weather conditions, the w r ork has 
progressed satisfactorily, and with no unforeseen delay the builders 
should be ready to turn over their completed work by the fifteenth of 
August as provided in their contract. C. E. Hartge, of Raleigh, is the 
architect and the Central Carolina Construction Company, of Greens- 
boro, are the contractors for the buildings. 

The present contract includes three pieces of work — the building of 
two dormitory annexes to the main building and the remodeling of the 
front of the main building. The dormitory buildings will be dupli- 
cates, each containing three floors. The basement floor has four well- 
planned classrooms. The first floor, which is at a level about two feet 
higher than the first floor of the main building, has eight rooms — one 
single and six double rooms for pupils and a teacher's room. The second 
floor, which is on a level with the second floor of the main building, is 
a duplicate of the first. Each floor has adequate baths, closets, etc. The 
two buildings will therefore provide eight additional recitation rooms — 
so much needed — and twenty-eight rooms accommodating fifty-two stu- 
dents. The wings stand each eight feet from the main building, with 
which they are connected on all three floors by vestibules built, as the 
buildings are, of brick. This arrangement necessitates some immediate 
remodeling in the second floor of the main building, slightly affecting 



210 The St. Mary's Muse. 



the number of places available for students, so that the effect of the 
wings will be to increase the net student capacity next year from 130 
to 175. In remodeling the front of the main building the old porch 
will be torn away and a new one, broader and longer, with full pillars 
to the top, which will be on a level with the third floor, and entrance 
from the front instead of the sides, will give an entirely new effect. 

These changes are important in themselves, but we hope are still 
more important as being pregnant with meaning for the future. Dr. 
Bratton, when he took charge of the school for the trustees in 1898, 
found here the three original buildings, the main building and the East 
and West Rock Houses; the art building, which was erected in 1884, 
and is an admirable and entirely suitable building for school purposes 
up to its capacity, and the chapel. In addition there was the old wooden 
infirmary and the other minor and more or less inadequate out-buildings, 
including the old brick kitchen and the little boiler house. In his four 
years administration, while the school was growing in numbers by 
leaps and bounds, he saw the erection of the rectory, which by taking 
the rector's family from the main building increased the number of 
students in that building, and the north dormitory ("Far Country") 
intended only as a more or less temporary building until funds would 
permit of the erection of one more permanent. In the closing days of 
his administration the old infirmary burned and he left the model new 
brick infirmary as a legacy to his successor. The growth in the four 
years of Mr. DuBose was more in the line of improvement of what was 
here than in new building. The infirmary was completed, the chapel 
was enlarged and beautified through the gifts of the alumna? ; numerous 
important if not especially prominent changes were made in the ar- 
rangements of the heating and lighting system ; the steam laundry was 
added ; and finally the auditorium was built. Each step made the plant 
more effective, but the number of accommodations was not increased, 
and this, through no lack of desire, but because the necessary funds 
were not available, the purchase debt still being the work to which 
energy had to be especially directed. In the last year of Mr. DuBose's 
administration the last payment on the debt was made, and his suc- 
cessor took hold of an unencumbered though entirely unendowed prop- 
erty. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 211 

It has been apparent for years that the school must grow in size if 
it is to reach its fullest usefulness. Conditions have changed and the 
school must meet the changed conditions. It has therefore been a ques- 
tion with the trustees and Mr. Lay not of building something but of 
how to go about it. So many things are needed that it is a hard mat- 
ter to decide among them. 

The first step forward was in the adoption of a plan for the future 
development of the school property. Heretofore the buildings have 
been put up regardless of the architectural effect of the whole, each 
suiting the taste of the time and the funds available, and none regard- 
ing the others. The result has not been over-pleasing. In planning 
new dormitories some have wanted to build in front of the main build- 
ing, some to tear away and replace the old building, and some to pre- 
serve it and build in such a way as to leave it still the center of the pic- 
ture. Sentiment unless it is reenforced by present deeds is worthy of 
little consideration, but St. Mary's would hardly seem like St. Mary's 
to the alunime without the pleasingly arranged main building and rock 
houses, and the affection of the alumnae is one of the more important 
assets of the school ; so all will rejoice that a way was found to preserve 
the old and yet get all the advantage of the new. 

About a year ago the trustees approved the plans of Mr. Hartge, the 
architect, who, in submitting a design for the building which it was 
hoped to erect immediately, included in it a suggestion for future 
growth. 

Following out this plan the main building will remain the central 
figure among the group of buildings, unchanged on the outside except 
for the remodeled front, which will more closely resemble the original 
front than that of the past thirty years ; and the grove, which has been 
at once a beauty and a delight, will not be impaired in either beauty or 
extent by the new buildings. On the other hand, the main building 
will be entirely remodeled inside, though retaining the chief features 
of the parlor, and the new dormitories will be built in sections as addi- 
tions to it. Each section will be entirely independent in one sense of 
every other section, being separated from its neighbors by fire doors 
and fire walls, and yet in a larger sense all will constitute one building. 
The first sections run east and west from main building, and it is these 



212 The 1 ' St. Mary's Muse. 



that are included in the present building contract. The next additions 
will run north from the additions now being built ; the next east and 
west from those, and so on. Each new section means accommodation 
for twenty-six additional pupils, and each will cost about $12,500. 

But dormitory accommodation alone might prove rather burdensome 
than advantageous unless suitable boarding accommodations are avail- 
able, and so the architect's plan provides for a dining room building 
some 150 feet to the rear of Smedes Hall. With wise forethought this 
building has come to include also the much desired gymnasium which 
will be on the basement floor with the dining room above it. Eventually 
the dormitories would form a hollow square with the dining room build- 
ing, the middle of the north side, as the main building, will be of the 
south. It had been hoped to build the dining room building this sum- 
mer, but it has been deemed best to wait until three-fourths of the neces- 
sary funds ($25,000) is available, when the work will go forward. One 
virtue of the plan is that the present kitchen and dining room arrange- 
ments will not be interfered with by the building operations, which can 
accordingly be done at any time. 

The plan of work is (1) the building of the first two dormitory an- 
nexes and the rearrangement of the outside of the front of the main 
building — the present contract; (2) the erection of the dining room 
building, with dining room of ample size for present and prospective 
needs, suitable kitchen accommodations and gymnasium; (3) the entire 
remodeling of the interior of the main building; (4) the remodeling 
of the interior of East and West Rock and the removal of north dormi- 
tory to a suitable position in the grounds. Each of these steps could 
be taken very advantageously at once. The wherewithal is the impor- 
tant element lacking. Eriends of the school and of school work could 
hardly find a better opportunity for gifts large or small. 

Two points warrant us especially in rejoicing: One, the adoption 
of the uniform plan, insuring a harmonious development; the other, 
the taking of the actual first step in building which must lead on to 
greater things. We can not stand still, we must go forward or fall back, 
and St. Mary's has too many loyal friends and supporters for us to 
even contemplate the latter alternative. 

All together — forward ! 



The St. Mary's Muse. 213 



Honors for Miss McVea and Miss Czarnomsl^a. 



St. Mary's rejoices, with Raleigh and North Carolina, at the fresh 
honors which have come to Miss Emilie McVea, of the University of 
Cincinnati. jSTo graduate of St. Mary's has had a more useful career 
since her graduation ; has shown a more unfailing and persevering de- 
votion to her Alma Mater and a more active interest in its growth iud 
best development, or has had a greater part in upbuilding the school 
than Miss McVea. Her success in the broader educational field outside 
was foreshadowed by her energetic and effective work here, and with 
success her devotion to the interests of the school has been increased 
rather than diminished. 

Miss McVea graduated at St. Mary's with the class of '84, that class 
whose name was as potent to conjure with in the later SO's and 90's as 
that of the class of '04 has been in these latter days. In the class with 
her graduated two other girls who with her were destined to give 
freely of themselves to their Alma Mater and to make their mark in the 
life of the school — the lamented Miss Elizabeth Battle, of Tarboro, 
whom later Miss McVea w r as to succeed as Lady Principal, and Miss 
Martha Dowd, who after long years of efficient service in the depart- 
ment now presides so satisfactorily over the music in the school. 

Miss McVea after graduating at St. Mary's came back to teach in 
the school and did so to eminent satisfaction for years. On Miss Bat- 
tle's retirement from the Lady Principalship in 1898 Dr. Bennett 
Smedes chose Miss McVea to succeed her, and she was Dr. Smedes's 
right hand in his last years. She continued on with Mr. Bratton for a 
year after he took charge and then resigned to resume her college work at 
George Washington University, Washington City, where she took her 
A.B. in 1902 and her A.M. in 1903. She was then called to the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee by Dr. Dabney, president of that institution, to 
be associate in English literature, and went with him to the University 
of Cincinnati in 1905. There she was made Assistant Professor of 
English and has held that position since. In addition to her work at- 
the universities she has found time to lecture considerably outside of 
the college, and has taught several summers in the Summer School of 
the South at Knoxville. 



214 The St. Mart's Muse. 



The Cincinnati Commercial-Appeal says of her : 

Miss Emilie McVea, the newly-elected Dean of the Women's Departments, Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, is well known throughout the city and State for her lectures on 
literary and philanthropic topics. 

Miss McVea has had a brilliant career in educational circles. She was first teacher, 
then principal, of St. Mary's College, Raleigh, N. C. Graduating with an A.B. degree 
at George Washington University in 1902, and as A.M. in 1903. She was also in 
the English Department of the University of Tennessee, and was active in extension 
work among the teachers. 

Through her work at St. Mary's, and especially through work in the summer 
school of the South at Knoxville, Tenn., where she lectured for five consecutive 
sessions, she also added to her reputation. 

She was one of the organizers, in 1903, of the Southern Association of College 
Women, an organization for the promotion of all larger educational interests. 

Miss McVea has been connected with the University of Cincinnati since the fall of 
1904. Besides the regular university work, she has held classes for teachers in 
Cincinnati, Madisonville and Covington, Ky. 

She is a woman of rare qualities, keen penetration, wide sympathies, generous 
impulses, with a full understanding of women, their ways and needs. 

While always active in alumna? matters of St. Mary's Miss McVea 
has been especially prominent the last three years as the author of the 
plan for raising the Iredell and McKimmon Scholarships and the chief 
spirit in the movement. That the object has not been accomplished 
more speedily has been due to no lack of interest on her part. More 
recently she has been busy with plans looking to the securing of an en- 
dowment for the school. 

St. Mary's is much the richer for the energetic interest of Miss 
McVea. 

Miss M. E. J. Czarnoniska, whom Miss McVea now sricceeds in the 
University of Cincinnati as Dean of the Woman's Department, was as 
well known to the girls of twenty years ago as is Miss Thomas or Miss 
Dowd to the girls of to-day. She came to St. Mary's in 1877 to teach 
literature, and later succeeded Mrs. Kate deRosset Meares as Lady 
Principal. Xot only did she win a long-remembered reputation as Lady 
Principal, but she charmed also as an inspiring teacher and made a deep 
impression on her pupils. Miss McVea came under her influence first 
as pupil and then as teacher, and their friendship dates from those St. 
Mary's days. From St. Mary's, about 1887, Miss Czarnomska went 
to Smith College, then a very different sized institution from what it is 



The St. Mary's Muse. 215 

to-day, and practically constructed the department of literature. Her 
executive ability and charm as a teacher stood her in good stead and 
her department grew steadily in size and popularity. After long ser- 
vice she felt entitled to some lighter duties and in 1905 accepted Dr. 
Dabney's invitation to go with him to Cincinnati as Dean of Women, 
when he went there to build up that large university. She now leaves 
that position to accept the benefits of the Carnegie Retiring Fund, a 
richly deserved honor ; and is to be succeeded in Cincinnati by her 
friend, associate and former pupil. 

St. Mary's looks with pride to the success of these two talented wo- 
men, whose faces girls of the present day know from the excellent photo- 
graphs which hang in East Hock. 



The Death of Mrs. Lay, Sr. 



It was with a feeling of genuine sadness on the part of both teachers 
and pupils who had known her that the news came on February 19th 
of the death in Baltimore of Mrs. Eliza Withers Lay, widow of Bishop 
Lay and mother of the rector. 

Though she was in her eighty-third year and had been in almost con- 
stant pain for several years, Mrs. Lay, when spending the late spring 
and early summer with Mr. Lay at St. Mary's a year ago, had seemed 
remarkably strong as she was uniformly cheerful. Her friends had 
ever esteemed it a great privilege to be with her and those also who 
wi*re fortunate enough to see much of her during her stay in Raleigh. 
She was intensely interested in St. Mary's, in which her sister was once 
a pupil and which is the chosen work of her son, and her optimistic 
cheer at all times was an inspiration to those less firm in spirit. 

Mrs. Lay's strength had seemed to be failing this winter though her 
condition was not considered serious. The rector accompanied by ins 
wife had gone ]STorth in February for a business trip and a brief visit 
to his mother. He was in Boston at the time she was stricken, but was 
able to be with her almost at once. 

We clip the following sketch from the Churchman: 

Mrs. Eliza Withers Lay entered into rest on Friday, Feb. 19, 1909, at her resi- 
dence in Baltimore, Md., in the 83d year of her age. 



216 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Mrs. Lay was the widow of the Rt. Rev. Henry C. Lay, first Bishop of Easton, 
and the niece of the Et. Rev. Thomas Atkinson, third Bishop of North Carolina. She 
was born in Lunenburg Co., Va. In 1847 she accompanied her husband to Alabama, 
where Bishop Cobbs had invited him to take charge of the mission work at Hunts- 
ville in that diocese. In 1859 the Eev. Mr. Lay was consecrated Missionary Bishop 
of -Arkansas, and was translated to the diocese of Easton in 1869, where he died in 
1885. Soon after Bishop Lay's death, Mrs. Lay removed to Baltimore, and connected 
herself with the Church of St. Michael and All Angels, of which she continued to be 
a devoted member until her death. She and her daughter, Miss Louisa Lay, who died 
about two years ago, were both filled with untiring zeal in the cause of missions 
and the Chnrch in the diocese, as well as in sociological and charitable work in the 
city. Mrs. Lay set a bright example as an earnest communicant and reverent wor- 
shiper, in utter loyalty to the parish, the clergy and to the rubrics of the Prayer 
Book. We shall all miss her presence in God's house, her kindly sympathy, her wise 
advice, for she was able "to bring forth out of her treasure," the stores of her 
knowledge and experience, "things new and old." 

She is survived by three sons — Mr. Henry C. Lay, of Colorado; Mr. Beirne Lay, 
Master in St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., and the Eev. George W. Lay, rector of 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C. Services were held in St. Michael and All Angels' 
Church before the body was talcen for burial to Easton, Md. 



Miss ChscKley's Epiphany Verses. 



To our deep regret through, an oversight the Epiphany poem of Miss 
Ohcckley, printed in the Epiphany (January) Muse was presented in 
incomplete form. We know that our readers will enjoy seeing it again 
complete. 

Epiphany. 

By high stars led, 
With great hopes sped, 

From East to West, 

On glorious quest 
The Wise Men tread. 
Thro' desert sand, 
And alien land, 

Their Star abides, 

And onward guides 
That Hope-drawn band. 
Nor fray, nor stay, 
Nor devious way, 

Can turn aside 

Their seeking wide, 
Befall what may. 
Beyond each bar, 
They follow far 

The beckoning gleam, 

The Heavenly beam, 
Their fair great Star. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



Until at last, 

The long way past, 

By stable door, 

O'er manger floor, 
Their Star stays fast. 

With great light led, 
With rare gifts sped, 
Is tJiis the end 
To which they wend — 
A stable shed? 

Shall incense rise 
To starry skies, 

From this dull scene, 

And hovel mean 
Of sad surprise! 

When such amaze 
Hurts their glad gaze, 

Can sages now 

In homage bow, 
And anthems raise? 

Where an Infant lies 

In lowliest guise, 

The Wise Men, — see! — 
They bend the knee, 

And veil their eyes! 

So, our Christ before, 
(Though strange His door!) 

From roughest spot, 

Or humblest lot, 
May we adore. 



Braswell-Weir. 



Mr. John Campbell Weir 

requests the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of his sister 

Harriet Page 

to 

Mr. Robert John Braswell 

on Wednesday morning, March twenty-fourth 

nineteen hundred and nine 

at ten o'clock 

Christ Church 

Seventy-first street and Broadway 

New York. 



21 S The St. Mary's Muse. 



With the Girls of Recent Years. 



What more interesting news this month than that of the approaching 
marriage of Miss Lucy Taylor Redwood, '04, of Asheville. Since her 
graduation Miss Redwood has for the most part taught, being first at 
St. Paul's School, Beaufort, and last session at Eastville, Va. It was 
presumably during the latter experience that she met Mr. S. Thomas 
Nottingham whom she is to marry next month. Two St. Mary's girls 
will be among the bridesmaids and Mr. DuBose will go to Asheville to 
perforin the ceremony. Miss Redwood's future home is to be on the 

Eastern Shore. 

* * # 

The value of the Muse as an advertising medium is shown in the 
acknowledgment of Miss Minnie Burgwyn, the class secretary, of the 
finding of the class letter through the notice published in the Muse. 
Miss Burgwyn is not over-pleased with the energy shown by her fellow- 
members in forwarding the letter and keeping her posted as to their 
whereabouts, and urges that each and all of them give renewed evidence 
of their class loyalty by sending their present addresses to her at once 

at her home address, Jackson, 1ST. C. 

* * * 

Her many friends are very glad to welcome back to Raleigh Mrs. G. 
Lyle Jones, of Franklin, who as "Margaret Mackay" was an honor 
graduate in 1906. Mrs. Jones went last year from her Raleigh home to 
Franklin as a bride. She now comes back to her home city for a season, 
her husband having been made assistant to the Attorney-general in the 
new State administration. And by the way, Attorney-General Bickett's 

wife too is a St. Mary's girl, nee Fannie Yarboro, of Louisburg. 

* * * 

And as if from across the waters after the lapse of months comes a 
word of greeting from "Bettie Woolf." Just why Miss Bettie, who was 
quite a factor in St. Mary's life in her day, should have cut the ac- 
quaintance of her old friends since her graduation as valedictorian of 
the class of 1906 she does not say, but she now sends good wishes from 
Dothan, Ala., where she is teaching. Those friends will understand 
as they read: "Little did I think that 1909 would find me a 'school- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 210 

marm!' These two years have heen full of rich experiences. Last year 
I was forty miles from a railroad teaching 'young ideas how to shoot' ; 
and this year finds me way down next to the Florida line in a town of 
ten thousand people, though it is not yet twenty years old. In the pub- 
lic schools there are 900 children, and there is no question about the 
broad field open to the teacher. I have a division of the fourth grade 
and have enjoyed my work, for results are easier seen here than in most 
places." 



Alumnae Notes. 

Miss Kate Broadfoot, of Fayetteville — a St. Mary's girl of the 
nineties, spent ten days at St. Mary's, in February, as guest of Miss 
Fermer and Miss Thomas. Miss Broadfoot traveled in Europe with 
Miss Fenner and Miss Thomas last summer. 



Mrs. Leach Hoover (May Harrison) visited St. Mary's in February. 



Mrs. Thomas Kenan, of Wallace, 1ST. C, made a short visit to St. 
Mary's in February, as guest of Miss McKimmon. 



Miss Marguerite Halbin, of Philadelphia, and Miss Lula Taliaferro, 
of Charlotte, St. Mary's girls of last year, visited here in February. 



Edwards & Broughton Printing Company, Raleigh, N. O. 



REfiD !— M0RK 1-flCT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The MUSE, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is iheir loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



'It's worth the difference" 



WHARTON & TYREE 

" Workers in Artistic Photography ' 



They talk about a woman's sphere 

As though it had a limit; 
There's not a place in earth or heaven, 
There's not a task to mankind given, 
There's not a blessing or a woe, 
There's not a whisper, yes or no, 
There's not a life, or death, or birth, 
That has a feather's weight of worth, 
Without a woman in it. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES fflffi SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGECO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. Alt-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



Smith * Tomst Co. 



GROC K iv »- 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Society Monogram Papers, Visiting Cards and Stationery 

OF THE NICEST QUALITY AND LATEST STYLES AT 

ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO'S BOOKSTORE 

A Good Grade Fountain Pen at $1.00 



Raleigh and Southport Railway 

Short line between Raleigh and Fayetteville 
Wilmington, Max ton. Red Springs, Benhettsville, 
Florence. Charleston, and all Atlantic Coast Line 
points. For information as to schedule and rates 
call on local agent, or write 

F. T. RICKS, 
Asst. General Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, H. W. JACKSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DOKTCH, Secretary. 



"Why is it our poetic friend, 

When thoughts sublime he lacks, 

For Pussy cats galore will send, 
And stroke their glossy backs?" 



Obviously. 

"You are a very stupid man," 
Said I; "the point you lose; 

For that's the only way he can 
Invoke the subtle mews." 

— Harvard Lampoon. 



.ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Usethe best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 
BANKING. 

All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. S;it'e Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 

Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, 1ST. C. 

Capital. - - $ 1OO.00O.00 
Surplus, - - lOO.OOO.OO 

Deposits, - 1,175.000.00 

Assets, - 1. 500.000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO. 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



"How very lucky is my lot, 
I'm as happy as a clam; 

For whether I am right or not, 
I always think I am." 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORK 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 

GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything 111 our line. 

22 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



S ALVA TORE DESK), 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any articlt selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 



INSURE IN THE 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY. 

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW 

Ladies' Furnishings and Novelties. 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

T. W. BLAKE. 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Candy — China. 

Pictures. Stationery. Toys. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in An. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



A school paper is a great institution. The editor gets the blame, the manager 
the experience, and the printer the money — if there is any. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBBINS' LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

'PHONE 81. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

at j. l. o'qitinn & co. 

Leading Florists of ><>rth Carolina. 

Raleigh, N. C. 


J. SCHWARTZ, 
RICHMOND MARKET. 


H. STEIN M E T Z . 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Viol' ts, Wedding Bouquets, 

P'loral Designs, Pal ins, Ferns and all kinds. 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 118. 


Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBT. SIMPSON, Dn,B "5SlI5S8S etc. 


DR. RUSSELL G. RHERRILL, 

Dentist. 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY' 


H. T. HICKS CO. 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Man 's who wish to carry 
their s'.adies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 
Francis P.Venable, Pres., Chapel Hill, N. C. 



School Calendar, 1908-09. 



March-April, '09. 
March 25, Thursday — Last Quarter begins. 
March 15, Monday — Faculty Recital. Miss Hull, 

Pianist. 
March 29, Monday — Recital. Miss Hull, Violinist; 

Summey, Cello, and the St. Mary's Orchestra. 



Violinist, and Miss Pixley, 
Miss Pixley, Pianist; Dr. 



April 3, Saturday— Prof. Collier Cobb, of U. 

and Dunes of Gascony." Illustrated. 
April 4, Sunday — Palm Sunday. Bishop's 

o'clock service. 
April 9, Friday — Good Friday. Holy Day. 
April 11 — Easter Sunday. 



N. C, on "A Lesson from the Landes- 
Visit for Confirmation at the 5:00 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO , 
PRINTERS AXD BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
R\LETGH. N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SWINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 
Fayetteville Street. 




YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



RALRIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pulleu 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cash'r. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four percent interest paid on deposits. 



m. 



Climate Healthy and Saiubr 



t. Mary's Schools 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



(jor girls and youtig women). 



JNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 17 T .190S. 



session ^H^HBBBBH terms. 

' B&STER; TERM BEG AN" : ijiNUARY H 1909. 



thejse. 



^X, THE COLLEGE. 

\^^BE )%Bsj£ SCHOOL. 
i S. 7 HE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



■ 



. THEUR2 SCHOOL. MBA ? - 
> 5. 7 HE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 






<va $u$'C Department, ifuck Equipment #ew. Tw^nfy-eight 
f&tllw. Knabe jifid St&nway Grami P/'ams. 
! 7ition to thc.So'.uai e»>« i'hrvitian tide of Fiht&ituju ir.thoul alight 

Ibev- George W. Lay, 



lEaafrr Number 




m 



91 iHanj 



April. 1300 



fialeiffh, H. 01 




The St. Mary's Muse. 



EASTER NUMBER. 



Vol. XIII. April, 1909. No. 8. 



Christ the Lord is risen to-day, 
Sons of men and angels say: 
Raise your joys and triumphs high, 
Sing, ye heavens, and earth reply. 

Love's redeeming work is done, 
Fought the fight, the victory won: 
Jesus' agony is o'er, 
Darkness veils the earth no more. 

Vain the stone, the watch, the seal, 
Christ hath burst the gates of hell; 
Death in vain forbids Him rise, 
Christ hath opened Paradise. 

Soar we now where Christ hath led, 
Following our exalted Head; 
Made like Him, like Him we rise; 
Ours the cross, the grave, the skies. 



Charles Wesley, 1735. 



The H°ly Grail. 



MINNIE TAMPLET HAZARD. 



Tennyson, when he wrote "The Holy Grail," handled a theme of 
sacred associations ; and, realizing this, it was long before he would 
touch upon it. And so to this Idyll the poet has given the thoughts of 
his later years. We find in it what might be called the mature creed of 
a mind even in youth strong and beautiful. The very nature of the 
subject bids that it be dealt with lightly. The atmosphere is almost a 
twilight one — objects are not definite and clear cut, but mystical. An 
observer who endeavors to look upon a painting of the Impressionistic 
School at close range will behold only a blur of colors ; he must regard 



222 The St. Maey's Muse. 



it from afar without the critical intention of analyzing its separate de- 
tails. Thus viewed, the canvas flowers into a full rounded representa- 
tion from the artist's hand. So, this Idyll is misty; for the appeal is 
to the inner self, and the reader must think upon it before the full 
meaning dawns. It is the significance of the quest for the Holy Grail 
and its effect which we want now to appreciate. 

The whole Idyll, a complete part in the series, represents one of the 
stages in the disintegration of Arthur's kingdom. The poet shows us a 
contrast between superstition, a sensual religion, and faith, a spiritual 
one. He is still "shadowing Sense at war with Soul." The knights 
who undertook the quest of the Grail were of two kinds — those to 
whom the object of search was as an exterior jmenomenon, whose vows 
with regard to it were actuated in the main by curiosity, (Arthur him- 
self says to them, 

"But one hath seen, and all the blind will see)"; 

and others to whom the sacred vessel was typical of true holiness and 
chastity. Let it be clearly seen that, though the one conception was 
infinitely more noble than the other, in both the religious fervor was 
not highly spiritual but sensual. The Sangraal itself is symbolical of 
union with Christ. This being so, the search such as the knights made 
was a mistaken one. 

We see them at Camelot, in the absence of the king, spurred by the 
presence of the Grail within their hall to swear the fatal vows. Ar- 
thur, returning from his work of aiding those who suffered in his realm, 
learns this. But the knowledge comes late to the king ; for, true to his 
ideal of loyalty to one's pledge, he must say to them, 

"Go, since your vows are sacred, being made." 

This needs must be Arthur's bidding even though he sees the evil in 
the search. So his knights pass forth from Camelot, and the king's 
halls are silent and, save for a tithe who have remained, deserted. 

And the meaning of this ? The chance of noble deeds comes and 
goes unchallenged. Fewer there are in Arthur's realm to help to right 
them that suffer wrong. And the men who had yet the power in them 
to do these things are wandering afar seeking a personal purification, a 



The St. Maky's Muse. 223 

personal glory. Apart from the difference of motives, the difference 
in characters, this remains the true purport of the quest — a quest which 
therefore was "an evil, not a good." What was it but a search after 
the unsearchable ? The Holy Grail, in its symbolism, may not be 
sought ; it is something which comes to men. May union with God be 
obtained by setting ones self apart ; by disregarding the appeals — nay, 
the claims — of a suffering humanity ; by fostering such a feeling of 
pure isolation that all men and all women, the creatures of God, become 
to one as phantoms ? JSTo, not so. "He that findeth his life shall lose 
it," the Master says to us. 

Then, we come to think upon the consequences of this quest of Ar- 
thur's knights. It is well to note briefly the experiences of those who 
strove after the vision ; for they are indicative of the visible features 
of the quest — features only too likely to attract a soul not anchored by 
the highest principles. Sir Galahad and the nun, in both of whom 
there was "all but utter whiteness" of soul, attained unto the perfect 
vision. For these the Holy Grail steals down a long beam of silver 
light, it comes attended by 

"A slender sound 
As from distance beyond distance." 

Before the eyes of Sir Percival the vision hung 

"Redder than any rose, a joy — " 

to him. Later, in answer to his king's question, Sir Bous says, 

"Ask me not, for I may not speak of it: 
I saw it — " 

And the poet adds, 

" — the tears were in his eyes." 

Thus to all these the vision came, but in lessening degrees of fullness 

and of beauty. And yet for Launcelot, named the greatest of the 

knights, the wonder though it did come to him was, because of his soul's 

sin, accompanied with a fierceness of light and heat that blinded him ; 

and his sad confession is 

" — but what I saw was veiled 
And cover'd." 



224 The St. Maey's Muse. 

As for Gawain, he saw not at all, nor wished to see. Of others we 
know that they but fulfilled Arthur's prophecy, following 

"Wandering fires 
Lost in the quagmire — " 

lost and gone. Another has summed this up in these words of deep 
meaning, "The vision (came) to each according to the soul of each." 
But what did those who saw the Holy Grail ? There were two who, 

" — leaving human wrongs to right themselves, 
(Cared) but to pass into the silent life." 

And in Arthur's hall Galahad's chair was vacant evermore, 
"However they may crown him otherwhere." 

The final result of the quest was that the vision seen or not seen had 
lost to the world the greater number of those who sought it — some lost 
through sin, some through purity. Tennyson has chosen to admit that 
a virgin life of holiness lived apart from men may be the best for a 
few rare characters, and these he typifies in the persons of Percival's 
sister and Sir Galahad. But the poet would bid us remember that, for 
the most part, we are not Galahads ; no, nor Percivals. But withal — 
and we would in no wise lessen the valuation of such characters, in 
themselves almost ideal — "they left behind them the impression of ex- 
celling purity, and that was good ; but it was purity severed from hu- 
manity, and that was not good." The king had said that the quest 
would maim the order which he made and would defeat its aims. His 
dark prophecy was true. 

And the king himself ? He had no part in the quest. This we have 
seen; and the reason we know. His was a right royal conception of 
kingship. Though enabled no longer to count the wonted number of his 
knights, still he sought to lighten a dark land, to make a dead earth 
live. This was his work in life. Even a vision of such grace and won- 
der as could make the eyes of the beholder 

"Beyond (all) knowing of them beautiful, 
Beyond all knowing of them wonderful — " 

even such a vision Arthur would not leave his work to seek. The 
knights, of principles less lofty, might go upon the quest of the Holy 



The St. Mary's Muse. 225 



Grail— not so the king. He told himself in words of deep, beautiful 
meaning, "Tku quest is not for me." And to Arthur, remaining at 
home, performing the duties that lay nearest to his hand, refusing to 
seek an isolated, personal salvation, there came more than mere vision 
For him there was the reality of faith, a joyous consciousness that He 
whose sacrifice was symbolized by the Holy Grail was daily with him 
mlus tasks. It was Arthur alone who had in its fullness the spiritual 
religion. One who perchance did wonder at the king's condemnation 
of the quest, comes now to understand. And it is here that he recalls 
the further words of the master whom the poet's Arthur followed, "He 
that loseth his life for my sake shall find it." 

An Easter Story. 



HELEN WILMEB STONE. 



It was a bright, sunshiny Easter morning. The turnip patch next 
( to Mr. McGregor's front yard glistened softly with dew, as two little 
; rabbits went carefully hopping their way among the green plants. It 
was, of course, Peter Babbitt and his college chum, Benjamin Bunny 
Like all college boys they were up to pranks, and this time it was to 
venture beyond the college limits of the turnip patch fence and go ex- 
ploring m Mr. McGregor's front yard. Being Freshmen, they were 
(not allowed to smoke even the mildest form of rabbit tobacco, and they 
had now determined to cut college, and go into the forbidden land 
where the precious weed grew in abundance. This bold and daring 
deed they were now trying to accomplish. 

Peter Rabbit, the older and braver, hopped nimbly along ahead, wav- 
ing his little white Freshman flag boldly in the air, as if he were on his 
way to root at a football game. Benjamin Bunny followed sturdily 
Soon they reached the crack in the fence, and in they went with a final 
flourish of each white flag;. 

Once inside, great was their consternation at the sight that met their 
eyes. For a moment little Benjie's heart stood still; but when he saw 
the sturdy bearing of Peter, he plucked up courage and stood valiantly 



226 The St. Mary's Muse. 

beside his friend. For there among the flowers of Mr. McGregor's 
front yard, on all sides, of all colors, of all sizes, were — rabbits. What 
did it all mean ? Where did these fellows come from ? What college 
did they belong to ? Where were the sweaters and caps every college 
man wore ? But they gave no answer to these vain questionings and 
sat still unblinking. 

As Peter and Benjie stood thus conversing under a great geranium 
leaf, down the walk there came running a little girl, followed by no 
other than the terrible Mr. McGregor. She was clapping her hands 
and crying out, "Oh, I'm going to find the Easter rabbits." Sure 
enough she made straight for the flower-bed where stood those immovable 
creatures. Why they did not form themselves into a flying wedge and 
make a dash for liberty, Benjie could not understand. She came closer 
and closer to the staring crowd, and finally gave a little shriek, stooped 
over, picked one up — and bit off his head. 

The two boys stayed to see no more. Peter gave the signal to Benjie 
and started for the hole. They scuttled through with a slight damage 
to Peter's flag. Past the turnips, scattering the dew, to right and left, 
they skimmed along. Soon they were within their own college walls 
bending over their first lesson and translating with shaking voice, "O 
tempora ! O mores !" 



The Pope is Dead, 



(Translated from Daudet.) 
In a great city of Languedoc Province, through which flowed a 
crowded, busy river, I spent my childhood ; and there early acquired a 
taste for voyages and a passion for sea life. There was one corner of 
the wharf, especially, near the Saint Vincent foot bridge, of which I 
can never think even to-day without emotion. Again I see the sign 
posted at the end of the boat-yard : "Cornet, Boats to Let" ; the little 
stairway dipping into the water, slippery and black from moisture ; and 
the bevy of little bright-painted boats, lining up at the bottom of the 
ladder, balancing gently side by side, as if made more buoyant by the 
pretty names lettered on their sterns — "The Humming Bird," "The 
Swallow." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 227 



Then, in and out among the long oars, shining- with white paint and 
drying against the embankment, old father Cornet was moving along 
with his paint pot, his great paint-brushes, and his tanned, chapped 
face wrinkled by a thousand little creases like the river on a windy 
evening. Oh my, that old fellow, Cornet ! He was the evil genius of 
my childhood, source of my grievous passion, my sin, and my remorse. 
How many misdemeanors has he not made us commit with his boats. 
I ran away from school ; I sold my books. What would I not have sold 
for an afternoon boatimr! 

All my school-books at the bottom of the boat, my shirt open, my hat 
pushed back, and the brisk river breeze fanning my hair, I pulled 
firmly on my oars, while I knitted my brows to give myself the expres- 
sion of an old sea-dog. * * * What triumph it was to mix with the 
movements of the great vessels, the rafts, the log-trains, and the small 
steamboats which traveled side by side and avoided each other, sepa- 
rated only by a thin curl of foam. * * * Best assured, it was no light 
matter to steer in that commotion, with only a twelve-year-old's arms 
and no one to hold the rudder. 

Sometimes came the opportunity of joining the steam tug. I quickly 
hooked on to the long train of boats in tow ; and with idle oars extended 
like wings, I let myself glide along with silent speed, which divided the 
river into long ribbons of foam and made the trees on the bank and 
the houses on the quay file past. Before me, far, far ahead, I heard 
the monotonous beating of the propeller, and the barking of a dog on 
one of the boats, from which rose a chimney and a little thread of 
smoke; and all this gave me the impression of a great voyage and true 
sea life. 

Unfortunately these meetings with the tug were rare. Generally I 
had to row during hours and hours of sunshine. Oh, the hot noon- 
tide falling straight on the river ! It seems to me it burns me still. 
All was glittering, all was shining with sunlight. In the dazzling, 
sounding air which rested upon the waves and vibrated with all their 
movements flashing silver gleamed from the short dips of my oars and 
the ropes of the boat hauler lifted streaming from the water. And I 
would row with closed eyes. For a moment, from the vigor of my 
efforts and the start of the water under my boat, I imagined that I was 



228 The St. Mary's Muse. 

traveling very swiftly ; but on raising my head I always saw the same 
tree near and the same wall opposite me on the hank. 

However, my terrible experience was the return. I vainly came 
back, rowing as hard as I could; I always arrived too late, long after 
the dismissal of school. The waning daylight, the first flickers of the 
gas jets through the mist, the bugle call of the retreat, all increased my 
fears and my remorse. The passers-by, returning peacefully home, 
filled me with e^vy; and as I hurried along my head was heavy and 
brim full of visions of the sun and water, with the roaring of the shells 
in my ears, and my face already flushing with the lie I was going to tell. 

For every time I had to answer that terrible "Where have you been V 
which awaited me on the threshold. This question met me on my ar- 
rival and frightened me most. I must always reply to it at once with 
a ready explanation, and of such an astounding nature that surprise cut 
short all further questions. Then I had time to enter and to get my 
breath ; and to bring this about I stopped at nothing. I invented acci- 
dents, revolutions, misfortunes, — all one district of the city had burned, 
the railroad bridge had fallen into the river. But the most extraordi- 
nary thing I ever imagined was this : 

One evening I reached home very late. My mother had waited for 
me a full hour, and was watching for me as she stood at the top of 
the steps. 

"Where have you been V she cried. 

Tell me not what mischief may enter a child's head. I had thought 
of no story, prepared no excuse. I had returned in too great haste for 
that * * * Suddenly a wild idea seized me. I knew the dear lady 
was very pious, a devout Catholic ; and I answered her with all the 
breathlessness of great feeling. 

"O, mother, if only you knew * * * !" 

"What then ? * * * What is it ?" 

"The Pope is dead." 

"The Pope is dead !" cried the poor woman, and turning very pale 
she leaned against the wall. I passed quickly to my room, a little 
frightened at my success and the enormity of my falsehood; however, 
I had the courage to bear it out to the end. I well remember that sad, 
sweet evening — my father very grave, my mother prostrated. They 



The St. Mary's Muse. 229 

talked in low tones around the table. I lowered my eyes ; but my 
escapade was so lost in the general desolation that no one thought of 
it again. 

Each member tried to outdo the other in citing some virtue of poor 
Pius IX ; then little by little the conversation wandered to the history 
of all the Popes. Aunt Rose spoke of Pius VII, whom she well remem- 
bered having seen pass in the South, sitting in the depths of a stage 
coach, between guards. The famous scene with the Emperor : "Come- 
dian ! * * * Tragedian !" was recalled. It was certainly the hundredth 
time I had heard her tell it, with the same intonations, gestures, and in 
that unvarying form which characterizes family stories. 

Nevertheless she had never seemed so interesting to me. I listened 
to her with hypocritical sighs, questions, and pretended interest; and 
all the time I was saying to myself : 

"To-morrow morning, when they find the Pope is not dead, they will 
be so happy that no one will have the heart to scold me." 

Then my eyes closed in spite of myself, and I had dreams of little 
blue boats in warm, drowsy corners of the Sarone, and visions of huge 
water-spider feet pervading my senses and rippling the crystal water 
into diamonds. V. R. B. Pickel. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Alice Leigh Hines, Rebe Hill Shields, Editors. 



Elocution Kscital. 



On Friday afternoon, March fifth, Miss Cribbs's Expression class 
gave a very entertaining recital. This is the first elocution recital that 
we have had this year, and I think that every one enjoyed it and hopes 
that Miss Cribbs will continue to have them very often. The program 
was: 

1. The Second Christmas Irene Xickerson 

2. Charles Stuart's Burglar Frances Loomis 

3. The Light Woman Mary Raids Gilliam 

4. An Embarrassing Situation Morjorie Brown 

5. How Gentlemen are Made Passie May Ottley 



230 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Dr. Bishop. 

At Sunday afternoon service, on the seventh of March, Dr. Bishop, 
Secretary of the commission of the Church's work for the negro in 
the United States, made a very interesting talk. Sunday evening after 
dinner he spoke to us very informally about education and his work 
among the negroes. He said that the world had had a great many 
men educators, but very few for women, and that he thought Dr. Aldert 
Smedes was one of the two great women educators of the United States. 
He then spoke of the negro problem. He affirmed that the North and 
South should work together for the uplift of the negro and the raising 
of his standard of living, for that was the chief trouble now. They 
should work together, for the North, from its distance, could see things 
about the negro that the South could not see, and in like manner there 
was much that the North could leam from the South. After this talk 
a number of us met him and he told us he had just recently been to 
Mississippi to see Bishop Bratton, who was building a girl's school at 
Vicksburg. 

Literary Societies. 

The two literary societies, 2 A and E A n ? decided to hold joint meet- 
ings commemorating the lives of some of the great men of which this 
year is the centennial. On Wednesday, March tenth, they celebrated 
the centennial of Gladstone. The meeting was called to order by Miss 
Leary, President of the 2 A Society. The first paper was "the Life of 
Gladstone," by Miss Lena Everett. Then followed the "History of 
Ireland," by Miss Frances Loomis, after which Miss Georgia Hales 
read a paper on "Gladstone in Ireland." The last paper, "The Grand 
Old Man," by Miss Paula Hazard, summed up the life and character 
of Gladstone who has been called "the Grand Old Man." 

The second in this series was held on Wednesday evening, March 
twenty-fourth, to celebrate the centenary of the great scientist, Darwin. 
The meeting was called to order by Miss Battle, President of the E A IT 
Society, after which Mr. Lay gave us a very interesting talk on the 
life of Darwin and his theories, commonly known as Darwinism. 

Panama Lecture. 
Mr. Harper, of the Raleigh Public Schools, favored us with another 
lecture Saturday, March sixth. His subject this time was "Panama," 



The St. Mary's Muse. 231 

and the pictures gave us a very clear idea of the conditions and life 
there. He told us how very much the United States government had 
done to make the conditions sanitary and how exceedingly well they 
succeeded. One picture that impressed most of us was the bunch of 
pink bananas, as so few of us had ever seen any pink bananas. 

BasKetball Match Game. 

On the 19th of March the Atalantan and Olympian ball teams met 
for their third contest. Each side had been victorious once at the two 
previous games, so this one was especially exciting. Both sides fought 
hard for the advantage; the playing was well matched and even, and at 
the end of the first half the score stood 4-1. Soon after the second 
half began the Olympians made a goal, through a momentary weakness 
in the Atalantan defense. This was the only noticeable error in an 
otherwise splendid game. The Olympians scored one on a foul soon 
after this, and although the game lasted some time longer, and both 
sides worked zealously, neither team was able to add to their score ; thus 
the final result stood 7-1 in favor of the Olympians, which gives them 
the championship. 

The line up was as follows : 

Olt/mpia. Atalanta. 

Lewis Center Harrison, A. T. 

Rogers Right Forward Rembert 

Slocomb Left Forward Gales 

Bourne Right Guard Fairley, G. 

Prettyman Left Guard Patrick 

Concert of Chamber Music by St. Mary's Trio. 
The fourth of the session's series of Faculty Eecitals, and the second 
Concert of Chamber Music was given by the St. Mary's Trio on the 
evening of March 29th to a large and appreciative audience. 

Miss Chelian A. Pixley, Pianiste; Miss Charlotte Kendall Hull, 
Violiniste, and Dr. George Summey, Jr., Cellist. 
The program was as follows : 

Trio, op. 1, Xo.l Beethoven 

Allegro. 

Adagio Cantabile. 
Scherzo, allegro assai. 
Finale — presto. 

3 



232 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Liebesgarten, op. 34, No. 1 Schumann 

Chanson Triste, op. 40, No. 2 Tschaikowsky 

Hungarian Dance, No. 5 Brahms 

Trio, op. 16 Jadassohn 

Allegro Tranquillo. 

Andantino. 

Finale — allegro grazioso. 

The News and Observer says: 

The second Chamber music concert of this season, given by St. Mary's Trio was 
much enjoyed last evening. 

The program began with the attractive Beethoven Trio, in E. flat, the first opus 
number of the great master. This work, with its beautiful adagio and merry 
Scherzo movement is one of the most popular compositions for concerted work. The 
Schumann "Liebesgarten," a beautiful little bit of song, and the Tschaikowsky 
"Chanson Triste," typical of the melancholy and mystery of this composer, made 
a great contrast with the Brahm's Hungarian Dance, vivid with Gypsy life and 
rhythm. 

The last number was the Jadassohn Trio in F major, which is distinctly modern 
in form and thought, and in direct contrast to the Beethoven Trio. 

The performance gave pleasure in many ways. The Trio possesses a well con- 
trolled temperament, and their playing was characterized by precision, purity of 
tone and a well defined, yet elastic rhythm. The year of intelligent enthusiastic 
practice together showed to advantage in the ensemble work which was beautifully 
finished and admirable in every respect. The applause was enthusiastic. 

The next in the series will be an orchestra concert with Miss Charlotte Kendall 
Hull as director. 

Professor Cobb's Lecture. 

On Saturday evening, the 3d, Prof. Collier Cobb, of the Chair of 
Geology of Chapel Hill, was the guest of the School and delivered one 
of his illustrated lectures in the Auditorium before an appreciative au- 
dience. It was not Professor Cobb's first visit to St. Mary's by many 
— for he is fond of recalling much appreciated visits which he was 
privileged to make here when a boy — and in his years of service at the 
University — he tells us that this is his twenty-first year of college 
teaching, though no one would believe it from his looks — he has been 
most kind in lecturing before the School every two or three years. 
The Auditorium had been built since his last visit and he endorsed 
the favirable opinion of it which has been expressed this winter by 
Mr. David Bispham, Mr. Walter Howe, and others who have appeared 
there. 

Professor Cobb in times past has introduced us especially to the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 233 

scenes of the Carolina coast — many of them interesting scenes of 
dreariness — and this time we went with him to France to see in Gas- 
cony similar formations and a similar coast with the difference that 
through modern methods of treatment — reforesting — the dreariness has 
disappeared. We shall hope that the same fate awaits similar stretches 
in our country. 

The subject of the lecture was: "Some Lessons from the Landes 
and Dunes of Gascony." Most of the photographs from which the 
slides were made were taken last summer, which Professor Cobb spent 
in geological investigation in southern Europe and northern Africa. 

To quote from the report in the daily press : 

Professor Cobb began the discussion of the desert conditions in various parts of the 
world by explaining the difference between the formation of soils and sand in arid 
deserts and on shore lines. The illustrations were taken from northern Africa, 
western Europe, and from the middle United States, as well as from the banks of 
North Carolina. An account of the* landes of Gascony, that region extending for 
seventy miles northward from the Pyrenees Mountains to the shores of the Bay of 
Biscay as it existed before the region was reclaimed by the planting of forests on 
the dunes was given as affording an illustration of what may be accomplished by 
somewhat similar methods in North Carolina. 

The Lenten Services — Confirmation. 

Lent has been passing quietly. The attendance at the special ser- 
vices on Wednesday and Friday afternoons has been good and the brief 
Lenten addresses of the Rector have been both interesting and helpful. 

The Rector's addresses have dealt with The Christian in His Daily 
Life and were intended to point out the duty of a Christian in the every 
day affairs that are too often considered as having no connection with 
religious obligation. He spoke in successive talks of the Christian inj> 
his amusements, in his speech, in his reading, in his business, in his 
civic duties, in his example and in his manners. Rev. Mr. London, of 
Louisburg, delivered the address on one afternoon and Rev. Mr. 
Griffith, of Kinston, was in the chancel on another occasion. Dur- 
ing the absence of the Rector on his two trips the services were taken 
by Rev. Mr. Luney and by Mr. Stone. 

During Holy Week there was a daily celebration of the Holy Com- 
munion except on Good Friday, and a daily special service in the after- 
noon at half-past five at which the Penitential Office was said and the 
Rector spoke briefly of the events commemorated on each day. 



234 The St. Maby's Muse. 

On Easter Day the Communion, with full music, was celebrated at 
8.00 o'clock. 

Bishop Cheshire made his annual visit for Confirmation on Palm 
Sunday at the afternoon service. The Confirmation Class included 
Rebecca Ellett, Wilhelmina Harlow, Mary Gladstone, ]STina Gibbs. 
Hilda Broadwood, Margaret Jarratt, Ivathryn Parker and George and 
Elizabeth Lay. jSTell Lewis was confirmed at Christ Church Palm 
Sunday evening, and Marjorie Brown went home to be confirmed in 
Atlanta the Sunday previous. 



School Notes. 



— Several of the girls have been fortunate in having their parents 
and relatives with them during the month. Laura and Exum Meares's 
father* and mother spent Sunday and Monday with them. Mary Shu- 
ford's mother and father were with her for several days. Martha Byrd 
Spruill's mother has been to see her twice and her father once. Ruth 
Mardre enjoyed a short visit from her parents. Janie Sims was made 
happy by having her mother and little sister with her for some time. 
"Tissie" Harrison also enjoyed a visit from her mother and sister, 
Mrs. Hoover — an old St. Mary's girl. Georgia and Lorna Hales were 
two others fortunate enough to have their mother with them for a short 
time. Gladys Hill's mother, who has been in Raleigh for several 
weeks, has returned home. Marie Thomas enjoyed seeing her father. 
Lena and Susie Everett were delighted with a visit from their aunt and 
grandfather. Margaret Jarrett was glad to have a short visit from her 
brother. Rebecca Woods's grandmother has been to see her for a short 
while. 

— Martha Byrd Spruill spent several days at home during the month. 
Marjorie Brown made a short visit at home, when she went to be con- 
firmed. 

— The Rev. Mr. Bishop, who was in Raleigh for some time, assisted 
Mr. Lay in one of our services. Rev. Mr. London gave us an interest- 
ing and helpful talk in another afternoon service. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 235 

— We have enjoyed having four of the old girls with us during the 
month. Fannie Dockery and Evelyn Weeks spent several days with 
us at different times. Annie Wood was delighted with a visit from 
her sister, Sophie. Susan Bynum spent some time here. 

— Some of the teachers have had little trips lately. Misses Fenner 
and McKimmon made a short visit to Fayetteville. Miss Gould was 
at Chase City for a few days. Miss Jones spent a short time in Hills- 
boro. Misses Thomas, Jones and Cribbs and Messrs. Cruikshank and 
Hodgson enjoyed going over to Durham to hear ex-President Eliot, of 
Harvard, lecture. 

— We are very sorry to part with "the thousand Manns." This term 
of affection has been including for the past two sessions Edith, Edna, 
Margaret and Lucy Mann and Cora Bryan who have been attending 
St. Mary's as day pupils. Mr. J. S. Mann, the father of Edna, Edith 
and Margaret, and the uncle of the other two girls, has just completed 
his second very successful term as Superintendent of the State's Prison, 
and now retires to his private interests in Hyde County, taking the 
girls with him, except Lucy whom we are glad to welcome as a boarder. 

Au Revoir, Mr. Hodgson. 

We're all sorry once more to say good-bye to Mr. Hodgson, who has 
been with us this time longer than for years. He came to St. Mary's 
for his winter visit just before l^ew Year, so we found him here when 
we came back from the holidays and while he finished his work here 
in about three weeks he has been staying at the school since while en- 
gaged on work in town. He has been as accommodating as ever and 
his verses convulse the present school generation as they have genera- 
tions past. "Six Little Maids," "The Faculty Cat" and "The Onion 
Feast" are classics of this year. 

And speaking of Mr. Hodgson calls to mind the great comfort that 
the new Kinetic Blower for the organ is. The organists and the girls 
who have had practice on the Chapel organ as well as the Rectors, have 
had occasion to lament the unsatisfactory results of man-blowing. Mr. 
Hodgson installed a new Kinetic just after the holidays and everything 
has gone beautifully. He has since installed other Kinetics in Christ 
Church and the Church of the Good Shepherd. 



236 The St. Maby's Mtjsb. 

Automobile Trip to Durham. 

On the 25th of March President Eliot, of Harvard, lectured in the 
afternoon in Durham and several of the teachers — Miss Thomas, Miss 
Jones, Miss Cribbs, Mr. Crnikshank, and Mr. Hodgson went over in a 
motor car for the lecture. It had rained in the night and a hard rain 
storm came up in the morning before they started, but by noon it had 
turned clear and cold, and at two o'clock, in spite of a very high wind, 
the party set out, cheered and encouraged by the assembled school, who 
were greatly interested in the trip. 

The party reached Durham in good time for the 3.30 lecture. Start- 
ing back as soon as it was over, they reached St. Mary's shortly before 
7 o'clock. They were greatly pleased with Dr. Eliot's lecture, which 
was a talk to teachers on present needs in the secondary and grammar 
schools. The trip itself was enjoyed by all and was almost devoid of 
the usual mishaps and delays that beset motor cars. 
prom St. Mary's to San Diego. 

It was a long trip that Frances Bottum had before her when she left 
us on the night of March 28th. She was going straight through via 
Greensboro and ISTew Orleans to San Diego, Cal., to which city her 
parents have lately moved from El Paso, Tex. The trip without de- 
lays takes five days and a half and she was not due to get home until 
Saturday, the 3d, at noon. Xone of us would have a longer trip to 
reach home except Mary Owen in going to Guatemala. But traveling 
is nothing new to Prances ; she made the trip to El Paso, Texas, last 
summer without company from jSTew Orleans and came back all the 
way by herself. She sees things always and writes very entertainingly 
of them. She writes on the third day out : 

It's almost as nice to write letters as to read on the train. 

We've had a very pleasant ride this morning. I wish you could have seen the 
flowers — pink thistles, which I thought very ugly at first but soon learned to like 
very much. The iris was banked along the canals and against old fences, tall and 
slender, light blue and in all shades to rich velvety purple and — think of it! — 
dark red! There were some funny white lilies, several blossoms at the top of the 
stem, each shaped like a perfectly round saucer with the long stamens making them 
look like huge spiders. There were some cream-colored lilies that looked like inverted 
tulips, a few white water-lilies and some yellow and white daisies. 

I saw some of the tiniest black birds on very long slender legs that could soar 



The St. Mary s Muse. 237 

about like buzzards and alight on the pond-scums without sinking; there are lots 
of wild ducks and also people are hunting them and fishing a good deal. 

We just passed some. queer trees, cypress ones I judge, though I don't know, that 
spread their trunks out, nearly forming roots from above the ground. They make 
a great deal of cypress lumber here. 

My handwriting has not improved, you see, as the Southern is a fairly smooth 
railroad and the Outlook calls the Southern Pacific very good and gives pictures 
of parts of it as perfect track. 

But we think she felt a little tired by the fifth day for she says then, 
in writing of the violets which she took with her from North Carolina 
to refresh her during the trip and remind her of her friends here : 

"We're far beyond San Antonio and the violets are just beginning to 
fade but are still a pleasure. I think they are very brave to keep 
fresher than any of the passengers on so long a trip." 



An Idyll. 

( A long way after Whitman. ) 
A night so soft and sweet, 
A sky of jet, with jewels spangled, 
A disappearing sickle of a moon; 
A sleepy bird's soft warble in a bush, 
A velvet-soft and cooling spring time breeze 
Sighing its gentle way through leaves and boughs, 
Seeking to kiss the cheek of sleeping beauty! 

St. Mary's slumbers in its grove. 

With faintest waft of wings and silv'ry glow she comes 

An angel from the realms of light. 

Pausing to listen to the long-drawn gurgling roar of maidens' slumbers 

And gently smiling as she listens. 

Hovering and smiling o'er each quaint and ancient building 

Until she reaches Senior Hall — 

There she gives pause 

She heaves a mighty sigh, 

She drops a mighty tear 

And with a cry she flees, 

Some one's been eating onions in that place. Chaw Sir. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July aud August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club.; 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. kaleigh, n. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1908-09. 
Maey Campbell Shuford, Editor in Chief. 
Ida Jean Rogerson, Business Manager. 

ESSIS5 } Ne - EdltOTS - Sfiv?^' } "terary Editors. 

Paula Hazard, Annie C. Wood, Associate Editors. 
Mary Ruth Mardre, Assistant Editor. 
Laura Meares, Exchange Editor. 
Frances BOTTOM, Assistant Business Manager. 

EDITORIAL. 



Easter. 



Can we realize that three-fourths of the long school year has now 
rolled by, that Lent is really over, and that Easter — bright, happy, joy- 
ous Easter — is here at last ? And when we think how short a time 
there lies between Easter and Commencement, do we not feel that our 
happiness is assuredly complete, with only a few short weeks between 
us and Home? But mingled with our pleasure is a tiny feeling of 
sadness when we remember the partings that must happen and the 
friends to whom we must say good-bye, and the many of us who will 
not return next year. But, we should not let anything, however slight, 
mar our Easter spirit ; so in this season of brightness and triumphant 
joy, let us make the utmost of the remaining school days, in order that 
we may look back on them, when Commencement does come, with no 
feeling of regret, but rather with the satisfying consciousness of many 
well-spent, pleasant and profitable hours. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 239 



The Habit of Reading. 



A student will find the reading of good authors a great aid to him 
in his written work. By it he gains new ideas, new expressions, both 
of which will be of service in composition. After the thoughts, before 
unknown, are understood and appreciated, they in a measure become 
his own; and he may be enabled by his enlarged vocabulary to clothe 
them at need, and so enrich and beautify his own work. Likewise, 
books often give the student the very words which will prove useful in 
expressing original ideas that he knew not how to convey in language. 
In addition to these larger helps, the reader is brought into contact with 
styles many of which may well serve as models ; and, as nothing is with- 
out its effect upon us, he must accordingly, at least in a measure, be 
benefited. Furthermore, faultless punctuation, spelling, diction, and 
other mechanical aids to writing are laid before him. And finally, he 
who reads with true appreciation will come to have a feeling of almost 
reverence for the language ; instinctively he will seek to use not alto- 
gether carelessly and indifferently the tongue which others have used 
with masterly skill, for the purpose of expressing high and beautiful 
thoughts. Reading, in a word, may give the student in his composition 
practical assistance and be to him an incentive to better work. 

M. T. H. 



The Bishop Parser Botany Prize. 



Bishop Parker, of ISTew Hampshire, who was a colleague of the Bee- 
tor at St. Paul's School, Concord, and who paid St. Mary's a visit as 
Mr. Lay's guest last spring, as an indication of his interest in St. 
Mary's, offered an annual prize to be awarded in whatever department 
the Rector should deem best. 

Announcement of the prize for this year has just been made as fol- 
lows: 

The Bishop Parker Botany Prize is open to any girl in the school for the best 
collection of wild flowers under the following conditions: The flowers must be 
collected and prepared by the competitor herself after January 1st, 1909, and must 
be handed in before 6 p. m., May 17, 1909. 

Each specimen must be mounted on the proper paper and on each there must be 



240 The St. Mary's Muse. 

noted the common name, the botanical name and the location where found. 

The name of the competitor must not appear. Each competitor will be given a 
number which may be put on each sheet. 

No prize will be awarded unless at least ten competitors hand in collections of 
twenty-five or more specimens. 

In awarding the prize the judges will consider any points that seem important 
to them including: 

1. Number of specimens. 

2. Excellence of individual specimens. 

3. Excellence of mounting. 

4. Excellence of arrangement. 

5. Correctness of identification. 

6. Scope of the collection. 



Au Revoir. 



It was with very genuine regret that the Muse editors and St. Mary's 
generally said good-bye for the year to Frances Bottum when she left 
on the 29th for her new home in San Diego, California. Miss Bottum 
has done effective work for the monthly Muse as Assistant Business 
Manager, hut she will be especially remembered in years to come for 
her drawings for this year's annual which will appear in May. The 
Senior Class and St. Mary's generally will give her many thanks for 
the excellent work which is one of the features of the annual. 



With the Exchanges. 



~No magazine values its exchanges more highly than the Muse and 
none is more appreciative of the criticism, gracious and otherwise, 
which is bestowed upon it by its fellow-magazines in friendly spirit 
than is this paper. But we have explained our position on the question 
of an Exchange Department and our reasons for publishing our maga- 
zine as we and our readers want it rather than as the Exchange Editors 
of our fellow-magazines think it should be so often that it seems the 
more dignified course now to pursue a policy of silence. 

It is therefore with the greater appreciation that we read the follow- 
ing comment in the University of North Carolina Magazine for March : 



The St. Maky's Muse. 241 

The Epiphany number of the St. Mary's Muse gives us some splendid little 
sketches. These sketches are exquisitely original. "The Close of a Winter's Day" 
is well written. But we confess a partiality for negro dialect wherever we find it, 
and "When Marse Jim Came Home" is full of this dialect, especially accurate. The 
sketch describes an old-time kitchen scene, two old-time negroes being the actors. 
The purpose is to paint negro character and is accomplished to perfection. The 
writer evidently knows thoroughly the negro of the ''Old South."' 

But this is the part that especially strikes us : 

The Muse having to combine the functions of our Tar Heel and Magazine, does 
its duty well. It is an attractive little monthly. 

There is no danger of our taking this favorable criticism too seri- 
ously, though it comes from such a welcome source ; but to prevent any 
too-great-satisfaction on the part of the Muse readers, we will quote 
briefly from two other of our esteemed fellows who are likewise criti- 
cising the Ephiphany number: 

'Tis said that precious articles come in small packages, and especially is a small 
article considered precious when received from a girls' school. So naturally it was 
with great expectancy that we opened the small package from St. Mary's. The 
literary department does not seem to be as full as the school would justify, and 
even should it be impracticable to get more articles, we advise that you increase the 
space allotted to this important department and make what articles you do use 
longer. * * * "The Close of a Winter Day" is a peculiar piece. We have never 
seen anything quite like it before, and confess that we don't quite understand its 
object. * * * The Muse is a success as a school paper, that is, one that tells in 
brief the happenings which interest the school, but to outsiders there is nothing of 
any material interest. We think it would be wise for your Exchange Editor to do 
some magazine reviewing, so that we may obtain the benefit of your ideas, the real 
object of exchanging. 

Again : 

The St. Mary's Muse is one of the smallest, yet one of the best magazines we 
have read. * * * We have only one adverse criticism of the Muse to make, the 
editorials are too short and some of the departments lacking. 

The Muse would acknowledge with appreciation the receipt of the 
following exchanges: 

Acorn (Baptist University for Women), Athenian (New Bern High School), 
Alabama Brenau Journal, Blackboard (Rocky Mount High School), Littleton Col- 
lege Chatterbox, Chimes of Shorter College, Chisel of the Woman's College of Rich- 
mond, University of Utah Chronicle, College of Charleston Magazine, College Message 
(Greensboro Female College), Donegal Banner (James Sprunt Institute), Emory 
and Henry Era, Erskinian, Furman Echo, Georgian, Grenadian, Virginia State 
Normal Guidon, Guilford Collegian, Clinton High School Hustler, Greensboi'o High 



242 The St. Maeys Muse. 

School Magazine, Flushing (X. Y.) High School Folio, Raleigh High School Enter- 
prise, Asheville High School Monthly, Hollins Quarterly, Horce Scholasticoe (St. 
Paul's School, Concord, X. H., ) Isaqueena of Greenville Female College, Lenoirian, 
Mary Baldwin Miscellany, Mercerian, Maryland Collegian, Messenger of Richmond 
College, Messenger of Durham High School, Millsaps Collegian, Newberry Stylus, 
Woodberry Forest Oracle, Duval High School Oracle, Palmetto of the College for 
Women, Trinity Park School Gazette, Pine and Thistle (Southern Presbyterian Col- 
lege), Atlantic Christian College Radiant, Red and White, State Normal Magazine, 
Stetson Weekly Collegian, Talisman of Florida College for Women, Tatler (Miss 
Madeira's School, Washington, D. C, ) Trinity Archive, University of North Caro- 
lina Magazine, Vanderbilt Observer, Wake Forest Student, Wesleyan, Winthrop 
College Journal. 



The Laying of the Corner Stone of the New Building. 



It has been many months since St. Mary's had such a happy occasion 
as was that of Saturday, April 3d, when with appropriate ceremonies 
the corner stone of the new buildings was laid. Xone of the older 
buildings at St. Mary's has had a corner stone and inasmuch as the new 
buildings at present in course of construction are practically wings of 
the present Main Building the corner stone ceremony to some seemed 
odd, but the service and the placing of the stone were not intended so 
much to belong to the buildings themselves as to make a distinct mark 
in the history of the School. As Bishop Cheshire said in his address. 
the day looked to the future while recalling the memories of a blessed 
and eventful past — marking the conclusion of the first period of the 
development of St. Mary's under Church ownership and the inaugura- 
tion of the second period. 

The weather was entirely propitious though the week had been one 
of frequent rains, and at one o'clock the procession formed and marched 
to the east wing, where a temporary floor had been laid and where in 
the northeast corner the stone was to be laid. The procession was 
headed by a part of the A. and M. College band (eight pieces) follow- 
ing which came the Choir. Then followed the Clergy, Trustees, spe- 
cial guests and students. 

After the singing of the processional hymn, "The Church's One 
Foundation," the sentences were read by Rev. Mr. Hunter, of St. 
Augustine's, who was acting as the Bishop's Chaplain, Psalm 122 was 



The St. Mary's Muse. 243 

said responsively and the Lesson (I Corinthians 111:9-17) was read 
by Rev. Mr. Barber, Rector of Christ Church. Hymn 490, "Glorious 
Things of Thee are Spoken," was sung and then the Rector read a list 
of the articles placed in the Stone, as follows : 

A Bible. 

A copy of the Book of Common Prayer. 

A Church Hymnal. 

Copies of the St. Mary's School Bulletin, containing the history of the School, 
descriptions of its present state, lists of the Trustees, Faculty, students and grad- 
uates, with photographs of the present buildings. 

Copies of the Annual Muse of 1905 and 1908, portraying the student life. 

Representative copies of the monthly Muse of the past few years, with accounts 
of the everyday life of the School. 

Copy of the Last Will and Testament of Miss Eleanor Clement. 

The Stone was then set in its place and the Congregation united in 
saying the Nicene Creed. The Rector then read appropriate prayers, 
after which Bishop Cheshire, as President of the Trustees, then de- 
livered the address of the occasion which is printed elsewhere. 

Hymn 311, "Ancient of Days," was sung, and then the Bishop 
striking the Stone three times with the trowel, said : 

"In the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost, 
I lay the Comer-stone of this Building to be erected to the Glory of 
God and for the cause of education in this School of St. Mary's. 

"Other Foundation can no man lay than is laid, which is Jesus 
Christ." 

The Long Meter Doxology was then sung and the service concluded 
with the Benediction pronounced by the Bishop. 

The Luncheon. 

At the conclusion of the service the special guests were invited into 
the Dining Room where luncheon was served. 

The News and Observer says of this part of the occasion : 

By invitation of Bev. George W. Lay, a large number of guests joined the 
Faculty and students of St. Mary's at luncheon, which was served in the dining room 
of the School, where, with delightful service from the menu and the interesting 
addresses made, an hour of social pleasure was passed. The large dining hall was 
filled with students, Faculty and visitors, and hospitality was the order of the 
occasion. 



244 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Three tables were set aside especially for the clergy, officers of the Faculty, mem- 
bers of the Board of Trustees, and invited guests. At these tables were Bishop and 
Mrs. Cheshire, Rev. and Mrs. Geo. W. Lay, Hon. Richard H. Battle, Dr. R. T. Vann, 
County Superintendent of Schools Z. V. Judd, City Superintendent of Schools Frank 
M. Harper and Mrs. Harper, Mrs. Kemp P. Battle and Mrs. Iredell, Rev. Milton A. 
Barber, rector of Christ Church; Rev. I. McK. Pittenger, rector of the Church of the 
Good Shepherd; Rev. John H. Crosby, in charge of St. Saviour's Chapel; Rev. A. B. 
Hunter, of St. Augustine; Rev. J. E. Ingle, of Henderson; Rev. H. R. Luney, Dr. K. 
P. Battle, Jr., Dr. Richard H. Lewis, Prof. Hugh Morson, Miss Kate McKimmon, 
Miss Thomas, Mr. W. H. Richardson, Mr. Edward E. Britton, Mr. Ernest Cruikshank, 
and Mr. C. E. Hartge. 

Rev. Geo. W. Lay was the toast-master, and his introduction of the speakers was 
witty and happy, many good things being said after the good things on the tables 
had been enjoyed. After a pleasant reference to the occasion and to the guests, 
Mr. Lay called on Hon. Richard H. Battle to speak. 

Mr. Battle's response was bright and clever. He gave reminiscences of his early 
acquaintance with St. Mary's and how he had braved barbed wires where the young 
ladies were concerned. He declared that the sounds of the young ladies' voices at 
the luncheon reminded him of the twitter of the blackbirds while he was out 
fishing. In telling of a proposal made over the telephone in its early days he 
referred to the young lady concerned as "Miss Jane Jones" and immediately there 
was a burst of laughter and much applause in the room, for while Dr. Battle had 
selected what he supposed was a forgotten name, there was a Miss Jane Jones at 
the luncheon, who blushed mightily. Mr. Battle declared, however, that it must have 
been her aunt. Then leaving the humorous he spoke of the new era of St. Mary's, 
paying tribute to it, its work and its workers, with wishes that it go forward in its 
splendid achievements. 

Dr. R. T. Vann, President of the Baptist University for women, was then intro- 
duced by Mr. Lay. In his opening remarks he gave a greeting from the Baptist 
University and congratulated St. Mary's on the present occasion and on its progress. 
He introduced many happy quips and quirks into his talk, some jolly poetry also, 
and then in serious mood he spoke of the building and making of the true woman, 
a work far beyond the mere knowledge obtained in books and closed his remarks most 
happily. 

Prof. Frank M. Harper, Superintendent of the city schools, was the last speaker, 
and he extended greetings and sincerest best wishes to St. Mary's on behalf of 3,000 
public school children and 76 teachers. He said that of the lady teachers now 
employed in the schools of the city, eleven are alumnse of St. Mary's, but "a little 
leven leventh the whole lump." It seems to be the custom of St. Mary's girls to 
"make good" whether teaching school or selecting a husband. The speaker spoke in 
warm terms of the sympathy and helpfulness of the rector in his attitude during 
the past year toward the Raleigh schools, saying in conclusion "that St. Mary's may 
continue to enrich the lives of the young womanhood of the land, that it may see the 
fulfillment of its every hope and aspiration, that it may witness the complete 
realization of its loftiest ideals, is my fervent hope and prayer." 

This closed the occasion, a most auspicious one for St. Mary's, whose future is 



The St. Maky's Muse. 245 

bright with the promise of an increasing influence for good among the young women 
of North Carolina and the South, an institution to which added years give it but a 
stronger hold upon all the people who come in contact with it and learn of the great 
work which it is doing. 



The Address of Bishop Cheshire at the Laying of the Corner Stone- 
A Brief Review of the Past Ten Years and a Look. Ahead. 



Ladies and Gentlemen, Friends of St. Mary's and Daughters, Officials and Pupils 
of the School, Brethren all, ivhose hearts are in the good ivork of education: 

"I welcome you to this happy and significant service in the life of our school, 
which now for sixty-seven years has been a foremost influence throughout the South 
in the education of women. 

"This day looks to the future, but it recalls the memories of a blessed and event- 
ful past. Ten years ago, to go no further back, St. Mary's was, or seemed to some, 
hardly more than a noble memory. The Rev. Bennett Smedes had just been called to 
his rest. We had no assurance of finding a competent successor. A first payment 
had been made upon the school property, but the remaining indebtedness was, in the 
opinion of many wise and good men, a burden which threatened to sink the new 
enterprise. Of apparatus, furniture and equipment, the school owned absolutely 
nothing. 

"I shall not dwell upon the good work by which all that has been changed. But 
I will point out that the work so far has necessarily been largely confined to organiz- 
ing, improving and consolidating what we had received from the past. From a 
personal enterprise St. Mary's has become a church institution, owned and controlled 
by the Carolina dioceses. During the first period of ten years much has been done. 
In the mere matter of material improvement and equipment almost as much has 
been expended upon the school as the price originally paid for the property. Of the 
higher kind of work done by the rectors of the school and their faithful helpers I 
can not speak at this time — indeed I have no need to speak, for it is known to you all. 

"I may, however, say generally, that during this first period the work done has 
been along the old lines. First it was necessary to preserve and strengthen what we 
had, and to bring it up to its full measure of usefulness. Much has been spent in 
permanent improvements and additions all along the old lines of building and of 
work. Each particular need has been met by some special provision for that need. 
Thus the new buildings erected have been separate and unrelated structures, each to 
meet a separate demand — a rectory, an auditorium, an infirmary, etc. — all this along 
the old lines — and good lines for their day, and for the pressing needs of the school. 
And by this work, and by the more important work of our rectors and teachers, we 
have during this first period reduced into possession, and settled upon the permanent 
foundation of this church property, the blessed inheritance which had come to us 
from the life and labors of Dr. Aldert Smedes and Dr. Bennett Smedes, benefactors 
of the church in the Carolinas and throughout the South. 

"On this happy day I can not but remember how the latter of these, Dr. Bennett 
Smedes, with, it seems to me, a providential presentiment of the end, came, and 



246 The St. Mary's Muse. 

urged me as bishop of the diocese, to do what I could toward making St. Mary's 
School a permanent institution and possession of the church. He and his father 
had freely given themselves to the work of Christian education. They had during 
more than fifty years carried on the school at their personal cost and risk — and 
during that time the school had grown into a sort of corporate entity, with its 
peculiar influence, reputation and moral and spiritual atmosphere, so to speak, with 
a tradition and life of its own in the minds, not only of its pupils and graduates, 
but of the people generally, where it was known. He felt that the church should 
throw not away what had been thus by the labors of so many lives and through so 
many years built up. It had been the hope and the effort of both father and son to 
establish St. Mary's as a permanent institution of the church. 

"I thank God that this day I see that hope and that purpose realized in what has 
been up to this time accomplished in organizing, consolidating and developing St. 
Mary's School, as it came to us from its two founders. I join the son with the father. 

"But the true significance and importance of this day comes from its look forward. 
In the past we have met each special need with a special provision. We have been 
anxious for the preservation of the things that remain. Now we look to the future, 
and claim the greater good it has in store. We lay this corner stone of a building 
which is, in one sense, but an addition to an old main building. We do not break 
with the past, nor do we forget it. We tie to it with a firm knot of love and 
reverence. But the building which we now erect, this east wing of the old main 
building, and the west wing over on the other side, these additions to the old are 
also the beginnings of a scheme of symmetrical and inter-related buildings, which 
shall afford every facility for the growth and development of the school for many 
years to come. The trustees have adopted a general plan of additions and improve- 
ments of which the two wings now begun form, so to speak, the base line, and from 
these, as the years go on, and the necessities of the school increase, and as the 
developing generosity of our people shall answer to our just demands, from this base 
line shall be extended northward at" each extremity other lines of buildings, affording 
all the varied accomodations required by the growing work; and this great central 
court or quadrangle, shall be closed in on the north by a spacious and noble dining 
hall with an ample gymnasium underneath. So that from this time on each building 
to be erected shall be an additional element in one harmonious plan, desirable not 
only in itself, but because it adds beauty and completeness to the whole. 

"Those who have gone before have by their labors and their liberality placed us 
upon this vantage ground of their achievement. They have put it in our power thus 
to overlook and to anticipate the scenes lying before us. We owe it to them that 
we should go forward. 

"There is one name to be specially remembered by us this day. You have 
anticipated my speech in your thoughts, and are inaudibly saying it to yourselves — 
Clement, Miss Eleanor Clement. She was in her own life and work worthy of being 
associated with those two whom I have already named. Like them, she being dead, 
yet speaks to us to-day. And not only she speaks, but she stretches out a beneficent 
hand, and begins this great work for the future of our school. And as this work 
shall grow toward accomplishment these worthies and perhaps others like them shall 
be commemorated in this building or that hall ; and the names of Smedes and 
Clement shall at least in all our Carolina churches be 'freshly remembered.' " 



The St. Mary s Muse. 247 



IN LIGHTER VEIN— CLIPPINGS. 



"How's your father," came the whisper, 
Bashful Ned the silence breaking; 

"Oh, he's nicely," Annie murmured, 
Smilingly the question taking. 

Conversation flagged a moment, 
Hopeless Ned essayed another; 
Annie, I — I," then a coughing, 

And the question, "How's your mother?' 

"Mother? Oh, she's doing nicely!" 
Fleeting fast was all forbearance, 
When in low, despairing accents 

Came the climax, "How's your parents?' 



Man's Shoes. 

How much a man is like his shoes, 

For instance, both a soul may lose, 

Both have been tanned, both are made tight 

By cobblers. Both get left and right, 

Both need a mate to be complete, 

And both are made to go on feet. 

They both need healing, oft are sold, 
And both in time all turn to mould; 
With shoes the last is first; with men 
The first shall be the last, and when 
The shoes wear out they're mended new; 
When men wear out they're men dead, too. 
They both are trod upon, and both 
Will tread on others, nothing loath ; 
Both have their ties and both incline 
When polished in the world to shine, 
And both play out. Now would you choose 
To be a man or be his shoes? 



The Mystery. 

When I spoke to her at breakfast, 
Though she answered not a word; 
Still the pleasant smile she gave me 
Made me think that she had heard. 



248 The St. Mary's Muse. 

That night when she came to dinner 
My great wonder grew no less, 
For she wore dark gloves of dog skin 
With a dainty evening dress. 

And she walked in slowly backwards — 
Did not care that she was late; 
Stated as a fact of interest: 
"Angle-worms are good for bait." 

When I saw her late that evening 
She was in gymnasium dress; 
Old the suit was, soiled and wrinkled — 
Such a picture of distress! 

Her dark hair was powdered ( ?), matted, 
And her face was white and drawn, 
Like the face of one regretting 
That she ever had been born. 

"Poor girl, what has happened to you?" 
Asked I, wondering more and more; 
And she said, "Initiation — 
I was only pledged before." 



The Carpenter's Serenade. 

A lath! I quite a door you, dear; 

I've hallways loved your laughter. 
Oh, window you intend to grant 

The wish my hopes are rafter? 

When first I sawyer smile 'twas plane 

I wood rejoice to marry; 
Oh, let us to the joiner's hie, 
Nor longer shingle tarry! 

And now that I have axed you, dear, 
Plumb, square, and on the level 

( I've always wanted 2-by-4 ) , 
Don't spile hope's happy revel. 

The cornice waving, Peggy, dear, 

The gables all are ringing; 
Why let me pine? — for, oh, you know 
I'm sawdust when I'm singing! 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ceuikshank - - - - Alumrue Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

( Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Vice-Presidents I Mrs - 1 - M - p i"«nger, Raleigh, 

VICE PRESIDENTS, < Mj , g j, p Tacker Raleigh, 

[Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 

EDITORIAL. 



Alumnae Day- 



Wednesday, May 12th, will be the 67th anniversary of the Founding 
of St. Mary's. The clay was set aside as ''Alumnae Day" at the Alunmae 
meeting at the Commencement of 1907. For various reasons the at- 
tempt to observe it last year by Alumnse meetings in the various towns 
did not meet with much success, but last year's efforts, though feeble, 
were a beginning and there is no reason why this year these meetings 
should not be held as successfully as they are held on Founders' Day 
(November 1st). 

This year's Alumnse Muse will be published before May 1st so that 
there will be ample time to have copies of it in the hands of those who 
would like to make its contents the basis for an Alumnse Day program. 
And the Muse will not only be glad to furnish this Alumnae Muse to 
the number of copies desired but will send a suggestive program for the 
exercises of the day if desired. 

The exercises on April 3d, at the Laying of the Corner Stone of the 
]STew Buildings, seem to strike the keynote for this 1909 Alumnae Day 
observance — centering the loving memory of the deeds of the past on 
the Clements — mother and daughter — and pointing the way to the fu- 
ture growth and development of the School. Bishop Cheshire's address 
on that occasion gives an excellent picture of what has been done and 
what is to be done in the School of the Church, and should awaken 
pleasant memories and fond hopes for every Alumna. 



250 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The Commencement Meeting of the Alumnae. 

The annual Alumnae meeting this year comes on the afternoon of 
Tuesday, May 25th. These meetings are always pleasant and helpful 
but why should they not be made wider in scope and of more impor- 
tance in their bearing on general alumnae activity ? 

An Alumnae Chapter in a town, with officers in touch with the 
School and with meetings twice a year on Founders' Day and Alumnae 
Day, serves to hold the Alumnae of a community together and to keep 
them from getting out of the school spirit. When to this is added an 
interest in the Muse and a cooperation with the Muse to the extent of 
sending the paper Alumnae news for publication, the members of the 
Chapter can keep posted on the general news of St. Mary's and keep 
others posted about their Chapter news. But the Alumnae Reunion at 
Commencement affords the opportunity for making the arrangements 
for Alumnae activity complete. If at the Alumnae Day meeting each 
Chapter would appoint at least one delegate to be at St. Mary's at Com- 
mencement to represent the Chapter in general and each member of it 
in particular, and that delegate would come to St. Mary's and meet like 
delegates from other Chapters as well as the general officers of the 
Alumnae and the present officers and students of the School ; if she 
would talk over all the matters of interest and gather up the inter- 
esting threads of news and discussion, much of which necessarily never 
sees the light in the Muse, and could then go back home and talk over 
her experience with the other members who could not themselves be 
present, the personal touch would no longer be lacking, and the addi- 
tion of the personal touch would mean new life for every Alumnae 
activity. 

Why should not the Alumnae of every town do this much for Alma 
Mater and for themselves: 

( 1 ) Organize an Alumnae Chapter, and elect a President and Secretary. 

( 2 ) Notify the Rector of the School of the organization and give him the names of 
the officers so that he can communicate with the chapter. 

(3) Have the Secretary send a list of the officers' and members to the Muse, the 
Alumnae Department of which tries to keep informed about all the alumnae. 

(4) Arrange for the semi-annual meetings on Founders' Day (Nov. 1), and 
Alumnae Day (May 12). 

( 5 ) If possible, at the May meeting appoint a representative to attend the com- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 251 

mencement at the school and especially to represent the chapter at the commencement 
alumnae reunion. 

Of course these steps would be but a beginning but they would be 
enough in themselves to keep Alumnae spirit alive and would doubtless 

lead to further activity, which might be evidenced in 

(a) The appointment of a correspondent, or instructions to the Secretary to act 
as correspondent for the Muse, and send a letter from the chapter to the Muse 
at least twice a year. 

(b) Arrangements with the rector to have him or some other representative from 
the school present -with the chapter at one of the regular meetings or a special 
meeting at some time during the year. 

and in various other ways. 

Think the matter over, Alumna?. 



Bulletin 12. 



The St. Mary's Bulletin which has just been issued contains in addi- 
tion to the School Calender and lists of the Trustees, Officers and Stu- 
dents, an exposition by the Hector of "The Educational Position of St. 
Mary's" in which many of the Alumnae will doubtless be interested. 
Copies of the Bulletin are mailed on request. 



Alumnae Weddings. 



Richardson -Corbett. 

Dr. and Mrs. John Witherspoon Corbett 

request the honor of 

your presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Alice Witherspoon 

to 

Mr. Douglas Gordon Richardson 

on Wednesday evening the fourteenth of April 

at half after eight o'clock 

Grace Church 
Camden,South Carolina 
"Alice Corbett" was a great favorite in her school days at St. Mary's 



252 The St. Mary's Muse. 

(1905-07) and has many friends still at the School among girls as well 
as teachers. The Muse extends hearty congratulations to Mr. Richard- 
son, and wishes him and his bride-to-be a long and happy wedded life. 

Not ting ham- Red Wood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Redwood 

request the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Lucy Taylor 

to 

Mr. Samuel Thomas Nottingham 

Saturday evening, April the seventeenth 

Nineteen hundred and nine 

at nine o'clock 

Trinity Church 

Asheville, North Carolina 



Alumnae Notes. 



St. Mary's was glad to welcome Miss Evelyn Weeks who stopped over 
a night and day on her way from Charlotte where her sister Mary lives 
since her marriage. Miss Evelyn and her sister were at St. Mary's in 
1903-1904. 

Notice has been recently received of the death of Mr. John T. Sloan, 
the father of Annie W. Sloan, '06. The Muse extends its sincerest 

sympathy. 

The Library has lately received a copy of the James Sprunt His- 
torical Monograph, number 8, being a study of "The Provincial Coun- 
cil and Committees of Safety of North Carolina by Bessie Lewis 
Whitaker, A.M." The study was undertaken by the author as a the- 
sis for the Master's degree, which she was awarded in 1908. Miss 
Whitaker, well-known to many of the alumnse of St. Mary's, grew up 
in Raleigh and graduated from St. Mary's with credit in 1893. Since 
her graduation she has continued her studies and taught in a number 
of places and is now Assistant Professor of English in Winthrop Col- 



The St. Maey s Muse. 253 

lege. She has always taken an active interest in St. Mary's affairs and 
St. Mary's always rejoices with her in her successes. 

On his return trip from the annual meeting of the Association of 
Presidents of the Colleges for Women in the Carolinas, which met at 
Converse College, Spartanburg, March 18-20, the Rector spent the day 
at Winthrop College, Rock Hill, where he met with a hearty reception 
from the ex-St. Maryans who are teaching there. They include Miss 
Alice Edwards Jones, head of the department of Latin; Miss Bessie 
Whitaker, '93 of the department of English; Misses Emergene C. 
Schutt, Sadie Jenkins, '05, and Susie Battle of the Music Department. 
At Converse he saw several ex-St. Mary's girls who are now in school 
there, including Helen Breeden, of Bennettsville, who was here as a 
Ereshman and is now a Senior at Converse, Ella Croft, of Aiken, (St. 
M.'s 1904-06), Mary Cooper, of Oxford, (here in 1906), and Norman 
Leland of Rockingham (1906-07). 



Death of Miss Adelaide Boylan. 

It is with deep regret that the Muse records the death of Miss Ade- 
laide Boylan, which took place on the 4th of March in her 77th year. 

Miss Boylan was never a pupil of St. Mary's, but her constant in- 
terest in the school, her long residence as a near neighbor, and the num- 
ber of her relatives who were pupils here, drew her almost as closely to 
St. Mary's as if she were really an alumna. Her friendship with Miss 
Anne Saunders was an added bond. 

Miss Boylan's charm of manner and warmheartedness made her 
greatly beloved in Raleigh and elsewhere; her friends at St. Mary's 
are proud to have been counted in the wide circle, and they now wish to 
extend to all her loved ones their sincerest sympathy. 



Edward'. & Broughton Printing Company, Raleigh, N. O. 



RE0D !— MflRK I— fiCT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



' It's worth the difference" 



WHARTON & TYREE 



" Workers in Artistic Photography ' 



Last night as sister's beau was going home 

And they were standing in the dark front hall, 

I heard him say, "Sweetheart, I'll just steal one." 
And 'bout that time I heard Nurse Ellen call. 



This morn I went to the umbrella jar, 
Full of curiosity as I could hold, 

But not a single one of them was gone. 
I'd love to know what sister's fellow stold.- 



-Ex. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OE ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' EINE SHOES 5S» SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVIXIiE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



Smith * Tornst Co. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Society Monogram Papers, Visiting Cards and Stationery 

OF THE NICEST QUALITY AND LATEST STYLES AT 
ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO'S BOOKSTORE 

A Good Grade Fountain Pen at $1.00 



Raleigh and Soothport Railway 

Short line between Raleigh and Fayettevflle ' 
Wilmington, Max ton, Red Springs, Bennettsville> 
Florence, Charleston, and all Atlantic Coast Line 
points. For information as to schedule and rates 
call on local agent, or write 

F. T. RICKS, 
Asst. General Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, H. W. JACKSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, Secretary. 



College men are very slow, 
They seem to take their ease, 

For even when they graduate, 
They do it by degrees. — Ex. 

Johnny stuck His little brother 
In the grate to watch him smother. 
Pa found him there in awful fix; 
Ain't he cute? he's only six. — Ex. 



M. ROSENTHAL 
X CO. 

WILMINGTON & HAKGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 

BANKING. 
All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 


The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, $ 100,000.00 
Surplus, - - 100,000.00 
Deposits, - 1,175,000.00 
Assets, - 1,500,000.00 
Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchfoed, Cashier 


THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 


St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 


JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 

Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 





Mary had a little hat 

Not bigger than a stopper; 

Mary soon got rid of that — 

The present hat's a whopper. — Ex. 

Turn failure into victory, 
Don't let your courage fade; 

And if you get a lemon, 
Just make the lemonade. 



-Tribune Hustler. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 


WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 


ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 


Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 


GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. ' 






Advertisements. 



SALYATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY. 

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW 

Ladies' Furnishings and Novelties. 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



INSURE IN THE 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE 
I INSDRANGE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 



T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 
COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Candy— China. 

Pictures. Stationery. Toys. 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

„ Raleigh, N. C. 

Everything in Art. 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



0, wa'd some pow'r the giftie gie us, 
To see some folks before they see us, 
It wa'd from hands of torture free us, 

In this vale below. 
For we could to jungles hie us 
Where these bores might never spy us — 
Rather have the wild beasts nigh us 

Than some folks we know. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 

H . S T E INMETz" 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds. 

Raleigh .] of Plants. [Phone 113. 

ROBT. SIMPSON, Drugs ga etc . 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH,S BAKERY. 



ROBBINS' LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

'PHONE 81. 



J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

Dentist. 



H. T. HICKS CO. 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, BT, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 
Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's wbo wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 
Francis P.Venable, Pres., Chapel Hill, N. C. 



School Calendar, 1908-09. 



April,'09. 
April 3, Saturday, 8 : 00 p. m— Prof . Collier Cobb, of U. N. C, on "The Landes and 

Steppes of Gascony." Illustrated. 
April 4, Sunday, 5:30 p. m. — Annual Visitation of the Bishop of North Carolina 

for Confirmation. 
April 9, Friday — Good Friday. Holy Day. Services at 11:00, 2:45 and 5:30. 
April 17, Saturday — Inter-Society Debate. "Resolved, That extending the suffrage 

to women will be a benefit to society." Affirmative: Epsilon Alpha Pi 

(Julia Mclntyre, '09 and Ida Kogerson, '10). Negative: Sigma Lambda 

(Mary Shuford, '10, and Janie DuBose). 
April 19, Monday — Edward Howard Griggs, Teacher-Lecturer. 4:30 p. m. — Baptist 

University: "Emerson." 8:15 p. m. — St. Mary's: "Education for the 

Art of Life." 
April 23, Friday — 8:00 p. m. — Dr. Joseph Hyde Pratt, of Chapel Hill, "Some Les-J 

sons from Everyday Life." 
April 24, Saturday — 8:00 p. m. — Miss Cribbs presents the Children in "The Toy 

Shop." 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 


^fBROUGHTQWi} 
[f /PRIKTUSG COAfl 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited. 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 
Fayetteville Street. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pullen 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cash'r. Capital and Surplus 
875,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Location Central for the Car o Unas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 



66ih ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 17, 1908. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN JANUARY 21, 1909. 



/St. Mary's 



7. THE COLLEGE. 

2. r lHE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3. HIE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: J £ THE AR1 SCHOOL. 



5. HIE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



[ii 1908-09 are enrolled 200 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Steinway Grand Pianos. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training. 



For Catalogue and other infvrlwulU/n address 



fiev. George II'. Lay, 

RKCIOU. 



1 





ipcesCTommencement Bumber 



noa?, t909 



XLhc 




IRaldgb, m. C. 



ary's Muse* 



PRE=COMMENCEMENT NUMBER. 



Vol. XIII. May, 1909. No. 9. 



Jerusalem ! high tower thy glorious walls, 

Would God I were in thee ! 
Desire of thee ray longing heart enthralls, 

Desire at home to be; 
Wide from the world outleaping, 

O'er hill and vale and plain, 
My soul's strong wing is sweeping, 

Thy portals to attain. 

gladsome day, and yet more gladsome hour ! 
When shall that hour have come, 

When my rejoicing soul its own free power- 
May use in going home? 

Itself to Jesus giving, 

In trust to His own hand, 

To dwell among the living, 
In that blest Fatherland. 

What throng is this, what noble troop, that pours, 

Arrayed in beauteous guise, 
Out through the glorious city's open doors, 

To greet my wondering eyes? 
The hosts of Christ's elected, 

The jewels that He bears 
In His own crown selected 

To wipe away my tears. 

Unnumber'd choirs before the Lamb's high throne 

There shout the jubilee, 
With loud resounding peal and sweetest tone, 

In blissful ecstacy: 
A hundred thousand voices 

Take up the wondrous song; 
Eternity rejoices 

God's praises to prolong. 



256 The St. Maky's Muse. 



The Forest of Arden. 



M. C. SHUFOED. 



In considering that most bewitching of Shakespeare's comedies, "As 
You Like It," we find that almost all of the delightful events took 
place in a certain Forest of Arden, a place which must have been 
very wonderland. At first we would be naturally inclined to ask "Where 
then lies this magic land ? In what country does so beauteous a place 
exist V But when we are afforded a glimpse of that mystic spot, 
through the genius of our magician poet we know that the Forest of 
Arden lies in no geographical country upon the map, in no land bounded 
by heavy material limits, but rather in the country of a poet's mind, 
in the realm of a poet's fancy and in the land of a poet's imaginings. 
So when we reach this beauteous place, set in the midst of fairyland, 
we accept without question any strange or wonderful event that may 
happen, knowing that we are for the time in the Forest of Arden. 

Nowhere in the play does Shakespeare deliberately describe this 
forest to us, but when we piece together his few suggestive lines, and 
catch a little of the free, open-air spirit of the whole to infuse into 
them we find unfolding before us a Forest, wild, remote, far, far away 
from the sordid, petty intrigues of the court, a desert inaccessible, of 
grandeur and exquisite beauty. And soon we see the giant oaks, mossed 
with age, whose antique roots peep out to watch the swift brawling 
brook, and spread their deep shade over green moss, where sleepy wan- 
derers find welcome rest. There we feel the calm and quiet grandeur 
of the tall trees which expel even the slightest touch of wrong and 
wickedness. Finally, we come to the cottage where Rosalind lived, 
fenced about with olive trees, and west of the place long rows of osiers 
bending low over the murmuring stream. 

The fleeting, delicate spirit of the Forest is caught in the little 
snatches of woodland song we hear now and then, overflowing with rol- 
licking gaiety and boundless freedom from care or purpose. 

"Under the greenwood tree 
Who loves to lie with me, 
And tune his merry note 
Unto the sweet bird's throat." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 257 

Small wonder that the calm serenity of nature found its way into 
the banished Duke's heart and made him a philosopher indeed, finding 
"tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and 
good in everything." There the noblemen of the court met and mingled 
with the simple shepherds, and lived verily like old Robin Hood of 
England and his merry men. Deep in the forest, free from every defi- 
nite purpose or steadfast aim, they flitted each day more carelessly and 
merrily than its predecessor, and lived a life as tender, as free, and 
as joyous as the spring days that smiled around them. With the evil 
and the intrigues of the court far behind, truly they found, in thus 
joining the nobleness of gentle birth with the simplicity of nature, true 
liberty and never banishment. 

And if one cares greatly to visit this enchanted spot, it is very easy 
to lose yourself in this most charming of Shakespeare's comedies and 
wander for a time with Rosalind and Orlando "under the giant oaks, 
where brawls the brook," in the sunlight tempered by forest boughs, 
with the cool, sweet morning air upon our face and the murmuring of 
the stream in our ears, to live for a little while, with all that happy 
forest company, their gay and care-free life. 



Debate. 

Resolved: That old bachelors should be taxed for the support of old 
maids. 

Affirmative : 

Before discussing the point at issue I would like to explain to my 
hearers that I do not uphold the much discussed and extraordinarily 
important theory that bachelors should support the old maids entirely 
but merely to aid in the support of them. Also we are taking bachelors 
in the broader sense of the word. That is, not one, nor two, nor three, 
but every old bachelor, good or bad, should be taxed for the support 
of all old maids. 

First, we will consider the different classes of these selfish, hard- 
hearted creatures called bachelors from two points of view: (1) As 



258 The St. Mary's Muse. 

that of the man who has escaped from the many horrors and nightmares 
of matrimony, and (2) that of the man who was a big enough idiot to 
remain single when he might have had the chance to get a wife and live 
happily ever after. 

Now, taking the first class of bachelors — that is, those who are never 
bothered by cleaning up ; who escape being met at every turn by an 
angry voice ; whose papers are always blissfully muddled ; and oh, 
greatest joy ! who never have to button a dress ! Ought not a man with 
such blessings be thankful to have escaped the horrors and dangers con- 
fronting him ? And in what better or more appropriate manner can 
he show his thankfulness than by aiding the cause of those from whom 
he escaped — the old maids ? Why he ought to grasp at the chance. 

Now, the class from the second point of view — that is, the selfish 
bachelors. Those who spend all their money on themselves and who 
haven't sense enough to realize what they have missed by remaining 
single. These ought certainly to be taxed if for no other reason than 
to open their eyes and teach them as well as other equally foolish young 
men a timely lesson. 

Now, on the other hand, we will turn to the old maids. There are 
numerous and sundry kinds of these, too, but we are discussing chiefly 
those who are not able to take care of themselves. What's to be done 
about them? They have got to be supported in some way; but by 
whom ? The married men are certainly not expected to do it. There 
is no earthly reason why they should. The burden, then, will fall on 
the whole community if the bachelors do not take the case in hand. Of 
course my honorable opponent will immediately ask, a Why should the 
bachelors be expected to take the case in hand ?" But I want to ask 
her why shouldn't they ? Whose fault is it that they are old maids ? 
Why the bachelors, of course. Who could hear the heart-rending plea, 
"A man, a man, a great big man. My kingdom for a man!" and 
imagine for one instant that it was the old maid's fault ? 

Of course my opponent will argue that it was the old maid's fault. 
That they could have gotten married if they wanted to, therefore why 
should the bachelors suffer on account of their foolishness. I admit 
that it was partly the old maid's fault, but I never knew before that it 
was the girl who did the proposing. My honorable opponent might 



The St. Mary's Muse. 259 

try it if she likes, but she'd be mighty fresh if she did, and it's certainly 
not the rule in most cases. 

And so, in conclusion, I hold that bachelors should be taxed for the 
support of old maids: (1) Because the escaped bachelors ought to be 
thankful enough to help; (2) the selfish bachelors ought to be made 
to contribute; and (3) that it is the bachelor's fault and not the old 
maid's. Therefore, for the sake of humanity in general, they ought 
to suffer the consequences. 

But in further proof of this last point — . Can there be found in all 
literature an appeal so heart-rending, raised to pitying heaven by a 
bachelor, to compare with the following 

Old Maids' Lament. 
Oh dear, I want a husband. 
And if he dies I want another. 
And if he dies I want another. 
And if he dies I want another. 
And if he dies I want another. 
And if he dies I want another. 
Oh dear, I want a husband. 

Do you think for one instant that it was the old maid's fault ? 

Ida Jean Rogerson. 



Negative : 

In beginning this argument it must first of all be determined what 
constitutes an "old bachelor" and an "old maid." Now it is an un- 
disputed fact that a man may be fifty years old and yet in everything 
else but years be of the age of twenty-five. So also there are numerous 
women whose youthful looks and youthful nature belie their years. 
Thus it is evident that age is not the fundamental classification of old 
maids and old bachelors. If not years, then what ? Well, in this argu- 
ment whenever I use the term "old maid" I mean a horrid, prim, prissy 
person who has tried to get a man and couldn't, so she afterwards has 
soured on the whole world and can not abide fun and gaiety, but adores 
perfect quiet, spotless order and a cat. Parallel with this an old bach- 



260 The St. Mary's Muse. 

elor would be a gruff, ill-tempered, narrow-minded old man, who 
couldn't get anybody to have him and who is now set smack in his ways 
and shuns all women, young or old, pretty or ugly, as if they were 
poison. Under this classification, then, the question arises, should these 
horrid old bachelors be taxed for the support of these good-for-nothing 
old maids? Decidedly not. 

In the first place, the taxing of the old bachelors to support the old 
maids would have a very serious and deplorable effect upon all young 
men. If all the suitors considered that they had to hand out their good 
money for some old maid later on in life they would all say, "Well, I 
certainly will have done my full share when I do that," and so proceed 
to settle down with the definite idea of — not necessarily becoming an 
old bachelor, mind you — but of remaining single: and, good gracious, 
there's not enough men to go around now! But my opponent might 
argue that a man would get married just to shirk this responsibility of 
supporting an old maid. In reality, however, the plan would have the 
very opposite effect. The men would all think that they had done their 
full, whole and bounden duty in providing for an old maid and con- 
sider that supporting some unknown, impersonal elderly lady was in- 
finitely preferable to supporting a well-known personal wife. So they 
would accordingly grow wary and suspicious and inclined to avoid 
marriageable young ladies — and for the land's sakes, it's hard enough 
to catch a suitor now as matters are, and if it gets much harder it will 
be impossible. So I ask, would it be right and just to young girls to 
lessen the number of nice, available, perfectly good suitors for the sake 
of a few fussy old maids ? Emphatically no. 

We have now taken up and discussed the bad effects this plan would 
have on men, now let us see what the evil consequences would be in 
the case of women. Think how depressing it would be to always and 
forever trying to catch a suitor and never succeed ! Why soon the 
world would be full of old maids — real old maids — the disappointed 
sour kind. And you know every one of these old maids, if supported 
by old bachelors, would be just as extravagant as she could be and 
spend all the money she could get her hands on out of pure spite. So 
the old bachelors would be taxed so heavily for their support that every 
mother's son of them would soon be in the poorhouse. And wouldn't 



The St. Mary's Muse. 261 

that be a pretty state of affairs ? Besides, what earthly right have old 
maids to demand support of old bachelors, anyhow? My opponent 
might argue that they ought and should be supported by men who were 
so cowardly as to shirk their duty of marrying. But I'm sure my 
hearers agree with me that this is a free country and that any man may 
get married or not just as he pleases, without incurring either praise 
or blame. On the other hand, if a girl is so outlandish and horrid and 
pesky that she goes through the world without getting a single proposal, 
she deserves to be a real old maid, and a real old maid deserves to be 
left to starve! It's her own fault — she could have been a nice elderly 
lady if she had tried hard, and so she hasn't the shadow of a right to 
get the money unless she can get the man too. 

Therefore, in conclusion, I consider that the plan of taxing old 
bachelors for the support of old maids is not at all good nor desirable 
for, first, it would have the disastrous effect upon the men of lessening 
the number of suitors ; and, secondly, it would have the deplorable effect 
upon the women of making them spiteful and mean by exacting money 
for them to which they have no right. And last of all, in winding up 
this argument, I ask, what do we want fussy old maids supported for 
anyhow? Supported! Why they ought to be exterminated — and the 
quicker the better. One might learn to tolerate a poor old bachelor, but 
a pesky old maid — never. 

Mary C. Shttford. 



A May Morning. 



IRMA DEATON. 



The dew lies lightly on the meadow-grass; 

The happy flow'rs lift up their heads on high; 
The sun of May is rising fair and bright 

To fill with glory all the earth and sky. 

The trees that stand all clothed in living green, 
Have each their feathered choir that sweetly sing, 

And fill the air with songs of joy and praise 
To Him Who is the Giver of the Spring. 



262 The St. Mary's Muse. 

But look: the morning sun, now rising higher, 
Has kissed the drops of sparkling dew away: 

The world is filled with joy and light and life, 
And each heart feels the gladness of the May. 



SCHOOL NOTES. 



Alice Leigh Hines, Rebe Hill Shields, Editors. 



The Eighth Inter-Society Debate. 



On the evening of April twenty-sixth was held our annual Inter- 
Society Debate. The subject was: "Resolved, That the Extension of 
the Suffrage to Women Would Bring About a Better Condition of 
Society." The stage was prettily decorated in the colors of the two 
societies and with plants and vines and flowers. 

A few minutes before the appointed time the girls from the two 
societies filed in, the Sigma Lambdas sitting on the left, the Epsilon 
Alpha Pi on the right-hand side. The judges, Messieurs J. W. Bailey, 
C. H. Poe and Z. V. Judd, sat together on one of the front seats in the 
central row. At a quarter past eight the presidents of the Sigma 
Lambda and Epsilon Alpha Pi societies appeared on the stage with the 
four debaters, Julia Mclntyre and Ida Rogerson, for the Epsilon 
Alpha Pi, Mary Shuford and Janie DuBose for the Sigma Lambda. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, President of the Epsilon Alpha Pi, presided, 
assisted by Minnie Leary, President of the Sigma Lambda. The meet- 
ing was then called to order by the president, who announced the subject 
of the debate and Ida Rogerson, the first speaker on the affirmative, rose 
to read her paper. The others followed in rapid succession. 

The subject was very well treated indeed, and many people said it 
was the best debate held at St. Mary's since the famous one of '03. 

After the last paper was read and the retorts made the judges retired 
to make their decision. During their absence the girls sang "Alma 
Mater." After this the debate was opened to the societies, and Paula 
Hazard and Katherine Hawkins each spoke. After what seemed a 
year Mr. Poe, with a little teasing, delivered the decision in favor of 



The St. Mary's Muse. 263 

the negative. Then followed much rejoicing on the part of the Sigma 
Lambdas, but every one felt that it was hardly possible for any of the 
debaters to be given too much praise. 

Society Meetings. 

On Wednesday evening the third of the joint society meetings was 
held in the Parlor. As it was the night for the Epsilon Alpha Pi's to 
have a meeting Sallie Haywood Battle, President of the E A n Society, 
presided. This was different from the other joint meetings for this 
was not a centennial celebration. The subjects for this meeting were 
subjects relating to school life. The first paper was, "Good Manners 
in the School," by Frankie Self. The other papers were: "Students' 
Code of Honor," by Mildred Borden; "Students Responsibility," by 
Mary Shuford; "Students Duty to Physical Self," by Alice Noble. 
After the reading of these papers the president asked if there was any 
one present who had anything to add. Then some of the members of 
both societies added many valuable points. Those who did this were 
Eva and Ida Rogerson, Paula and Minnie Hazard, Julia Mclntyre, 
Mary Shuford, Lena Everett, Frances Loomis and Georgia Hales. The 
meeting became so interesting toward the last that the same person 
spoke more than once and even contradicted each other on points on 
which they did not agree. 

The fourth of the joint society meetings was held on Wednesday night, 
April twenty-eighth. Minnie Leary, the President of the Sigma 
Lambda Literary Society, presided. The program for the evening was 
a talk by Miss Dowd on Oratorio in general and the two greatest 
Oratorios, "Creation" and "The Messiah," with the lives of the com- 
posers of these two great masterpieces. She paid more attention to the 
"Creation" in preparation for its production at the May festival. I 
think that this talk made every one desire to see it in May. 

Commencement Marshals. 

At the last regular meeting of the literary societies the Commence- 
ment Marshals were elected. The Epsilon Alpha Pi had the chief this 
year and elected Annie Caroline Wood, of Edenton. The other two 
from this society are Ida Jean Rogerson, of Edenton, and Bessie 



264 The St. Maey's Muse. 

Smedes Erwin, of Durham. The Sigma Lambda elected Mildred Bor- 
den, of Goldsboro ; Bessie Arthur, of Union, S. C. ; and Hallie Jordan 
Carrison, of Camden, S. C. 

Mr. Griggs's Lecture. 

On Monday evening, April 19, St. Mary's had the opportunity of 
hearing Mr. Edward Howard Griggs, one of the most distinguished 
lecturers in America. Besides the quality of the lecture itself, Mr. 
Griggs's charm of personality and exquisite language contributed to 
make this one of the most notable lectures heard in Raleigh. The title 
of the lecture was "Education for the Art of Life," a broad but not a 
vague subject, and as it was treated it was masterful and inspiring. 

Mr. Griggs endeavored to define the educational ideals of our own 
time, giving their evolution from older forms, and showing the part 
that was and is played by the fine arts, literature and by men's lives 
in shaping our present standard of values in life and living. He showed 
that moral character and social efficiency result from endeavor as well 
as from accomplishment, and that it is the potentiality of a character 
rather than the fact of it that is of value. 

Dr. Pratt's Lecture. 

On Friday evening, the 23d, Dr. Joseph Hyde Pratt, the State 
Geologist, of Chapel Hill, visited the school and gave a very interesting 
and instructive lecture in the Auditorium. 

Dr. Pratt showed us scenes of the western part of the State and also 
gave us a few glimpses into the landscape of China. His subject was 
"Nature Studies from Everyday Life." He introduced us to scenes 
where improvements in the conservation of natural resources were much 
needed and in contrast showed scenes where vast improvements in this 
line had been made. 

His whole lecture was given in such a way as to make it highly in- 
teresting. 

The April Recitals. 
The programs for the April recitals are given below. The Audi- 
torium is so constantly needed now for rehearsals of the Commencement 
plays and music that these will probably be the last of the informal 
Thursday afternoon recitals. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 265 

April 1st. 

Scherzino Pdbst 

Dorothy Harm an. 

La Voix du Colne Van Gael 

Harriet Benedict. 

Chaconne Roubier 

Evelyn Jackson. 

Cradle Song ( Violin ) Kohler 

Rebecca Ellett. 

When Icicles Hang on the Wall Arthur Foote 

Mr. Lay. 

Russian Dance Denn4e 

Joanna Rogers. 

Air de Ballet Chaminade 

Julia Borden. 

" If " Jessie Gaynor 

Louise Vincent. 

Song Without Words Holzel 

Mildred Harman. 

Andante from Sonata, Op. 49, No. I Beethoven 

C. Cavell. 

Chorus — Cradle Song Abt 

April 9tb- 

Pas des Amphores Chaminade 

Katherine Overman. 

Three Green Bonnets Guy d'Hardelot 

Lillias Pratt. 

Dawn Nevin 

Laura Griffith. 

Aragonaise — Ballet from The Cid. 

Elizabeth Holt. 

Moonlight Bendel 

Vernon Holloway. 

Cradle Song ,Gaynor 

Hallie Garrison. 

Violin Obligato Margaret Erwin. 

Nachtstuck Schumann 

Frankie Self. 

Concertino . - Hubay 

Margaret Erwin. 

Romance Grieg 

Rebe Shields, Mary Shuford. 



266 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The Chase Van Laer 

Mildred Hall. 

Song of My Heart Hawley 

Lena Everett. 

Russian Dance Denn4e 

Elva Crowell. 

Waltz Chopin 

Hebe Shields. 

April 15tb- 
Waltz Chopin 

ESTELLE EGERTON. 

Slumber Song Gaynor 

Meta Mewborn. 

Gypsy Dance Eohler 

William Proctor. 

Sonata in Ci — 1st movement Mozart 

Nina Gibbs. 

Trust in Absence Baumfelder 

Lila Justice. 

China Tragedy Clayton Johns 

Lorna Hales. 

Waltz Tschaikowsky 

Katherine Fairley. 

Sonatina Gurlitt 

Esther Rembert. 

Saint-Saens Evening. 

Through, an oversight the Muse failed to make any comment on the 
concert given March 15 by Miss Hull and Miss Pixley. 

Miss Dowd read a short paper giving an account of Saint-Saens's 
work and his place in the musical world, and this was followed by the 
two concertos, both of which were illustrative of the great composer's 
brilliancy and originality. The numbers were rendered in the usual 
masterful manner to which Miss Pixley and Miss Hull have accus- 
tomed us. 

PROGRAM. 

Concerto in G Minor for Piano. 
Andante Sostenuto, 

Allegro Scherzando, 
Presto. 

(Orchestral parts on Second Piano, Miss Bertha M. Luney. ) 



The St. Mary's Muse. 267 

Concerto in B Minor for Violin. 
Allegro non troppo, 

Andante quasi Allegretto, 
Allegro non troppo. 

(Orchestral parts on Piano, Miss Pixley.) 

Polk Miller. 

Mr. Polk Miller gave one of his characteristic entertainments in the 
Auditorium on May 6th. His program was of its usual informal and 
delightful style, and consisted of anecdotes in negro dialect, songs of 
the old South and his inimitable banjo playing. 

Mr. Miller was assisted by a quartet of negro voices. These men 
gave a few of the modern coon songs, and some of the old weird melodies 
of slave days, all full of vividness and color. 

Mr. Miller's work will always be enjoyed and appreciated for its 
value and charm, and also because it is an attempt to preserve for us a 
chapter of Southern life that is fast being forgotten. 

Dramatic Club. 

On Saturday evening, May 8th, the Dramatic Club presented the 
delightfully witty play, "His Nephew," before an appreciative audience. 
The difficult art of becoming perfect gentlemen was successfully es- 
sayed by seven young ladies, whose manly strides and deep voices created 
havoc in the hearts of the feminine audience. 

Miss Frances Loomis, as the Private Secretary, gave a finished and 
humorous character study. Miss Irene ISTickerson, as Uncle Catter- 
mole, Miss Passie May Ottley, in the title role of "His Nephew," and 
Miss Martha Byrd Spruill, as Gibson, the tailor with social aspirations, 
brought out well the amusing complications of the plot, Miss Ottley 
proving to be a specially irresistible suitor. The other men's parts 
were assumed very manfully and with much success by Miss Sallie 
Haywood Battle, as Mr. Harry Marsland, and Miss Alice Hines, as 
Knox, the bailiff. 

Miss Esther Eembert and Miss Marjorie Brown, as the two daugh- 
ters of Mr. Marsland, were charming pictures of English girlhood and 
carried out quite in the manner that might have been expected their 
stern parents' prohibition against flirting. 



268 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Miss Mary Seaton Gales succeeded well in a double role, playing 
Mrs. Stead in the first act and the bluff and hearty Mr. Marsland in the 
later scenes. Miss Mary Owen was excellent as Miss Ashford. 

The stage settings were particularly artistic and the whole perform- 
ance was marked by a spirit and lack of self-consciousness or embar- 
rassment that reflected the greatest credit, not only on the Dramatic 
Club, but on Miss Cribbs, whose talents are devoted to its training. 

The "Shark Club" held its first meeting in Miss Fenner's room after 
the play, "His Nephew," on Saturday night. 

The members of the cast and a few guests were present. Miss Fen- 
ner served delicious refreshments, iced tea from a solid metal punch 
bowl, boiled eggs in eggshell porcelain, reception wafers in flexible cases, 
and certain small delicate pickles, especially favored at St. Mary's 
midnight repasts. The guests' complexions represented various styles 
of impressionistic art, and the conversation had the light brilliancy 
that always should pervade "green room" assemblies. Further meetings 
of the "Shark Club" are looked for with interest. 

The Toy Shop. 

The Primary Department, trained by Miss Cribbs, gave a delightful 
little play Saturday night in the Auditorium. The stage was arranged 
to represent a shop full of dolls, tin soldiers, Teddie bears, and all 
the other indispensable toys of a properly brought up child. But the 
dolls and soldiers, Punches and Jacks-in-boxes were real children in 
this case. The toy shop keeper was putting his finishing touches, pre- 
paratory to a grand bargain sale next day, when the curtain rose. The 
dolls were all tested to see if they were quite perfect — the walking doll 
was wound up, the talking doll was squeezed for her ma-ma, pa-pa, and 
all were found satisfactory — and the old owner sat down and soon 
fell asleep. Then the fun began. In came Fairy Bright Eyes, a little 
thistle-down fairy, and transformed them all into real girls and boys. 
The Jacks were saucy and needed rebuking, but even they were al- 
lowed to leave their boxes; the tin soldiers made most gallant lovers, 
and they and the dolls sang and danced, and had a beautiful time till 
five o'clock brought the dawn, the fairy vanished and all became dolls 
and tin soldiers again. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 269 

The whole entertainment was entirely successful. Katherine Hughes 
was a graceful and lovely fairy, and the dolls could not have been im- 
proved. Eleanor Mann played for all the songs and dances, and added 
largely to the success of the play. 

On May seventeenth the play was repeated and an admission fee 

was charged, the proceeds to go to St. Saviour's Mission evening school. 

Several new songs were introduced, and the play was well received by 

a large audience. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS. 
Dolls. 

Hortense a la mode Josephine Williford 

Gretchen, German importation Besie Folk 

Susie Anna R. Lay 

Carrie Mildred Williford 

Hattie Elizabeth Cross 

Tommy Lucy Lay 

Tin Soldiers. 

Captain Fritz Alice Giersch 

Private West Otto Giersch 

Private Cole Elizabeth Hughes 

Private Black George Lay 

Jumping Jacks. 

Nimble Florence Stone. 

Twister Frances Strong 

Punches. 

Droll Mildred Briggs 

Smile Katharine Crews 

Grin Elizabeth Lay 

Fairy. 

Bright Eyes Kathryn Hughes 

Timothy Tackhammer Passie May Ottley 

Accompanist Miss Eleanor Mann 

Picnic to the Neuse. 

Mr. Cruikshank entertained the Seniors delightfully with a picnic 
to the Neuse given them Monday, May third. The party, beside the 
Seniors and Mr. Cruikshank, included Miss Katie, Miss Lee, Miss 
Sutton and Miss Jones. They left the school at three o'clock, in two 
vehicles, which carried also many interesting looking hampers, baskets 
and "freezers." It was a beautiful afternoon and the iiour and a 
half drive to the river was none too long. When the party reached the 
river a naphtha launch was ready for them and they had a charming 
trip up the ISTeuse. It was an ideal afternoon for such a pleasure : the 



270 The St. Mary's Muse. 

river banks were exquisite with their drooping willows and water oaks 
and bright masses of flowers. On the way back the boat was stopped 
and all got out and gathered armfuls of mountain laurel, woodbine and 
other lovely flowers. 

At half-past six all were back again at the big flat rock, which had 
been selected for the supper table. A fire was made for the cooking 
of cocoa, the feast was spread, and the contents of the mysterious 
basket proved entirely acceptable; the smokiness of the cocoa was con- 
sidered an added charm, as was also the presence of certain ants and 
twigs in unexpected places. 

After supper the fire was revived into a real camp-fire, and all gath- 
ered around for stories and tales of summer plans. Shortly after eight 
o'clock, when the moon was well established, the leaving time came. 
The drive home in the soft moonlight, with the songs and the talking 
and laughter, was a fitting end for a little trip that was quite perfect 
from start to finish. 

The Junior Reception. 

"Senior entertainment, novel, interesting. Offer royal congratula- 
tions lavishly. A striking success," said one of the prize telegrams 
of the entertainment that the Juniors gave the Seniors on the evening 
of the tenth of May, and these few words tell what a success the even- 
ing was. The guests were received by Miss Rebe Shields, the presi- 
dent of the Class of '10, and her fellow-officers, Misses Mary Shuford 
and Paula Hazard. After all the guests had arrived, telegraph blanks 
were distributed and each guest was told to write a telegram of eleven 
words, the initial letters of the words forming the two words "Senior 
Class." Miss Jones proved to be the brilliant member of the Faculty 
present, and her telegram to the Junior class, which described the en- 
tertainment so well, secured for her the charming book, "Mr. Opp." 
Miss Mclntyre was the "star member" of the Senior class, and her 
telegram to the L. P., "Sassinate English 1ST immediately. Order report. 
Class late and Sal sits," won her the beautiful Christy Picture, "The 
Sweet Girl Graduate." After the prize telegrams were read a toast, 
which "Miss Katie" had written instead of a telegram, was read. 

Refreshments, which were very delicious, were then served, and 
after this diplomas, bearing a St. Mary's seal and tied with blue ribbon, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 271 

were presented to the guests ; and amid the laughter of all present 
these diplomas, which were "hits" on the aspirations or the character- 
istics of the guests, were read aloud. 

All agreed in thinking this one of the most original and delightful 
entertainments of the year. 



School Notes. 



— The following girls have enjoyed short visits at home during the 
month: Lena and Susie Everett, Blair Rawlings, Martha Byrd 
Spruill, Maud Bunn, Julia Borden, Lucy Dortch, Ila Rountree, Rebecca 
Ellett, Glen and Katherine Fairley, ISTora Belle Rosser, Alice Vander- 
ford ,Elizabeth Holt, Helen Slocomb and Bessie and Margaret Erwin. 

— Mary and Jessica Vann went to Chapel Hill with their uncle 
for the Virginia-Carolina debate. 

— Several of the "old girls" have been with us lately. Blandina 
Springs, during her visit in Raleigh, often came up to St. Mary's to 
see her sister Esther and other friends. Ellen Duvall came up for the 
inter-society debate and spent several days with us. Amelia and Bettie 
Sturgeon lately spent a little while with us. Mrs. Thurman Kitchin, 
nee Reba Clark, was up at St. Mary's while in Raleigh. Eliza Drane, 
when on her way to Chapel Hill for the dances, made a short visit at 
St. Mary's. Elizabeth Smith lately came over from the Southern Con- 
servatory of Music in Durham for a few days. 

— Passie May Ottley and Mildred Borden attended the Kappa Delta 
Convention in Washington. 

— Elva Crowell enjoyed having her friend, Miss Christine, of Dur- 
ham, with her for a short while. 

— We regret to say that some of the girls have been called home on 
account of sickness or death in the family. Eva and Ida Rogerson 
went home on account of the death of their stepfather ; Nina Gibbs, on 
account of the death of her brother; Janie Sims, on account of the 
death of her uncle. Janie Patrick was called on account of the illness 



272 The St. Mart's Muse. 

of her mother ; Alice Hines, on account of the illness of her mother, and 
Rebecca Ellett, on account of the illness of her father. 

— Hallie Carrison went home for several days for her sister's 
wedding. 

— Margaret Jarratt's mother, who has been in Raleigh for some 
time, has returned home. 

— Many of the girls have had their parents and relatives with them 
during the month. Rebecca Ellett's and Kathrine Parker's mothers 
came up for Palm Sunday for their daughters' confirmation. Martha 
Byrd Spruill and Ruth MclSTaughton have also enjoyed visits from 
their mothers. Byrd Henderson and Lena and Susie Everett were 
fortunate in having their fathers with them for several days. Georgia 
Hales's brother has been up to see her. Rebecca Wood has enjoyed 
seeing her grandmother. 

— Miss Thomas spent a short visit home during the month to gain a 
much-needed rest and to be with her sister-in-law, whose home was 
saddened by the death of a little daughter. But after a few days we 
were all glad to have her back at St. Mary's in her own place again. 

Study Mall. 

If x plus y are 46, 

And the moon don't shine all day, 
And sixty minutes make an hour, 

And May Day comes in May; 

If I am tired as tired can be, 

And gold is found in a rock, 
How long do you suppose 'twill be 

Before it's nine o'clock? 

— Mary Baldwin Miscellany. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. a « « ■ One Dollar. 

Single Copies, ■ * ■ • s Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. baleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1908-'09. 

Mary Campbell Shuford, Editor in Chief. 

Ida Jean Rogekson, Business Manager. 

Rebe Hill Shields, 1 w __™ !?,>««._,„ Minnie Hazard, > t,-^,,,™ t™,-*™, 

Alice Leigh Hikes, j News Editors - Lena Everett, j literary Editors. 

Paula Hazard, Annie C. Wood, Associate Editors. 

Mary Ruth Mardre, Assistant Editor. 

Laura Meares, Exchange Editor. 

Frances Bottum, Assistant Business Manager. 

EDITORIAL. 



Commencement — Home! When this last issue of the Muse reaches 
its readers the much-dreaded examinations will be over, the long- 
expected annual will be out and we will be enjoying all the gaieties and 
freedom of Commencement. And at the close of the school year the 
present board of editors will turn over their responsibility to the new 
board, who will be chosen from the Junior class of next year, to carry on 
the work. We hope that all those who cast a critical eye on our achieve- 
ments will be lenient with our faulty work and not censure our errors 
too severely. We also extend to the future Muse Board all best wishes 
for their greater success and a hearty desire that they may come much 
nearer the attainment of a first-class school periodical. 

But with the close of the school year, amidst all the joyous gaiety 
and festive rush, there comes a little feeling of sadness to tinge our 
happiness. For many of us this is our last Commencement at St. Mary's 
and we are sad to think we have come to the end of our school life 
and find there the breaking of many ties of friendship — necessary, but 
nevertheless hard. And for those of us who expect to return in the 



274 The St. Mary's Muse. 

fall, there is also the sad knowledge that so many changes must take 
place — old faces will be absent, old friends not in their places — and 
St. Mary's can not remain the same. But let us all — those who go out 
forever and those who expect to return — not cling to the old past and 
wish our life to remain always the same, without change or progress, 
for ahead of us all there is other work to be done and higher things to 
be accomplished. 



Rev. "William M. Green, of Vicksburg, Mississippi, has been a guest 
of Bishop Cheshire for several days, and during this time has been 
often at St. Mary's. Mr. Green is to be head of the new diocesan 
school for girls, which is to be opened in September in Vicksburg. This 
is the school for whose existence Bishop Bratton is largely responsi- 
ble, and on account of his interest and belief in St. Mary's Bishop 
Bratton is anxious that Mr. Green should spend some time in studying 
the conditions here. Mr. Green will visit other schools through the 
South and East in his effort to bring to the work in Mississippi the most 
fruitful ideas for school management. 



Reprinted from the 1909 Annual Muse. 

The Storm-Clouds. 



Ibma Deaton, '10. 



The sun's bright light is hidden, dark clouds are gathering fast, 
The fair earth lies in shadow, the sky is overcast. 

And great black storm-clouds roll on in their grandeur, wild and free, 
Like seething billows tossing on a dark and stormy sea. 

O ye wild, mighty Storm-Clouds that in your freedom roll, 
Your grandeur and your power with longing fill my soul. 
would that ye might bear me on with you, and far away 
To that bright and happy Somewhere within the realms of day, 
Where all is peace and gladness, the fight forever won, 
Where joy is everlasting, and weary days are done! 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

iMrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Mrs. 1. M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 
Mrs. P. P. Tucker. Raleigh, 
Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 

EDITORIAL. 



Alumnae Weddings. 



Rose-Weaver. 

Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs. Erasmus M. Weaver 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter, 

Leize Holmes, 

to 

Lieutenant William Watts Rose, 

United States Coast Artillery Corps, 

on Tuesday the twentieth of April, 

nineteen hundred and nine, 

at twelve o'clock 

Saint John's Church, 

in the City of Washington. 



Lynch-Green. 

Wilmington, N". C, April 30. — The marriage of Miss Jane Iredell Green, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Green and Mr. Herbert Adolphus Lynch, a prominent 
young Wilmingtonian, in St. James' Church, Wednesday evening at 6 o'clock, was 
one of the social events of the season in Wilmington. 

The church was simply but prettily decorated and was thronged with friends and 
admirers of the young people. As the guests were assembling, a select program of 
music was rendered by Mr. Johnson, the organist, accompanied by Miss Fannie 
Hines Johnson, of Raleigh, violinist. The bride was attended as maid of honor 
by her sister, Miss Mary Owen Green, and the groom by his brother, Mr. James 
Borden Lynch, as best man. Little Misses Mary Frances Johnston, of Asheville, 
and Nancy Battle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Battle, of Raleigh, were the 



276 The St. Mary's Muse. 

ribbon children, and the groomsmen were Messrs. John Q. Myers, George G. Lynch, 
Charles F. Green and Meares Harris. 

Immediately after the ceremony the bride and groom received the congratulations 
of friends at the home of the bride's parents on South Second street, leaving on the 
northbound train for a wedding trip to New York and other places of interest 
north, returning from which in about two weeks they will be at home to friends at 
Bolton, N. C, where the groom is an auditor for the Waccamaw Lumber Company. 



PoWers-Rougfoton. 



Mr. and Mrs. Bradford E. Roughton 

request the pleasure of your company 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Pauline 

to 

Mr. George Thomas Powers junior 

on Wednesday the twenty-eighth of April 

at half after twelve o'clock 

at their home 

two hundred and thirty-two Georgia Avenue 

Macon, Georgia 



Briwarda ft Broughton Printing Co., Raleigh, N- G. 



RE0D !— MflRKv !— £JCT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



' It's worth the difference ' 



WHARTON & TYREE 

" Workers in Artistic Photography ' 



The Annual Muse for 1909. 

The St, Mary's Year Book, 

ready May 25th. 

A few copies yet to be had at $2.50. 
Address : St. Mary's Muse, 

Raleigh, N. C. 



THE OOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 







Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES «© SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods K 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVIXLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



Smith s Tomst Co. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVIILB STREET 



Society Monogram Papers, Visiting Cards and Stationery 

OF THE NICEST QUALITY AND LATEST STYLES AT 

ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO'S BOOKSTORE 

A Good Grade Fountain Pen at $1.00 



Raleigh and Southport Railway 

Short line between Raleigh and Fayetteville 
Wilmington, Maxton, Red Springs, Bennettsville, 
Florence, Charleston, and all Atlantic Coast Line 
points. For information as to schedule and rates 
call on local agent, or write 

F. T. RICKS, 
Asst. General Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, H. W. JACKSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, Secretary. 



In Lighter Vein. 

Oh, the meanness of a Junior, 

When he's mean; 
Oh, the leanness of a Senior, 
When he's lean; 
But the meanest of the meanest and the leanest of the leanest 
Are not in it with the greenness of the Freshman when he's green. 



. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCKRS 

WILMINGTON & HAEGBTT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS EEADY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 

BANKING. 
All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 


The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital, - - $ 100,000.00 
Surplus, - - 100,000.00 
Deposits, - 1,175,000.00 
Assets, - 1,500,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 


THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 


St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N C. 


JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 

Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 





And he wondered what they'd say 

When he died. 
What the press would write about him ! 
What his friends would think about him! 
What the world would do without him! 

When he died. 
(But they didn't even know it 

When he died.) 



— Ex. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 


WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.* 


ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 


Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 


GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



S ALVA TORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 



INSURE IN THE 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE 
INSDRANGE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY. 

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW 

Ladies' Furnishings and Novelties. 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 
COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Candy— China. 

Pictures. Stationery. Toys. 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



If I were a joke-machine 
I'd make such awful stacks, 

That everybody'd laugh and laugh 
And fall upon their backs. 



— The Chatterbox. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBBINS' LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

'PHONE 81. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QTJINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 


J. SCHWARTZ, 
RICHMOND MARKET. 


H. STBINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds. 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 


Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


ROBT. 5IMP50N, ^FoL^S, etc. 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH.S BAKERY. 


H. T. HICKS CO. 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N", C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 
Francis P.Venable, Pres., Chapel Hill, N. C 



General Jones. 

He was reading Caesar's battles, 

But the words they came in jerks. 
"It's a good thing," said his teacher, 

"That you were not on the works: 

For if you fought with no more speed 

Than you can Caesar speak, 
You'd never be a general great; 

Now you may take your seat." 

— High School Enterprise. 



A 7:30 Wail. 

Where, oh, where has my necktie gone? 

Where, oh, where can it be? 
I'll be late to breakfast if I wait so long, 

And what will the teacher do to me? 

— Helen Nix in Mary Baldivin Miscellany. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited. 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 
Fayetteville Street. 




YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pullen. 
Pres.. Chas. Root, Cash'r. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

{for girls and young women). 
66th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 17, 1908. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN JANUARY 21, 1909. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. 1HE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
S. 1HE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instniction in these 

Departments : 1 £ THE AR1 SCHOOL. 



5. 1HE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1908-09 are enrolled 200 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Stein way Grand Pianos. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

RECTOR. 



Clement flDemorial IHumber 



jTourtb Hlunmae Wumber 



3unc t 1900 



TLhe 
St. /Ifoary's /Bbuee 



^ 



TRaleiob, fl <E. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

CLEMENT MEMORIAL NUMBER. 

Vol. XIII. June, 1909. No. 10. 



FOURTH ALUMNAE NUMBER. 



Clement Memorial Edition 



This annual Alumnae number of The Muse is inscribed to the mem- 
ory of Miss Eleanor Clement, pupil and teacher at St. Mary's in the 
first years of the School, through whose benefactions the present building 
improvements were made possible ; and to the memory of her mother, 
Madame Clement, first French teacher at St. Mary's, in whose honor 
Miss Clement established the Madame Clement Scholarship. 



CONTENTS. 



Miss McVea to the Alumnae 278 

The Alumnae Committees 280 

Rector's Letter to the Alumnae 280 

Centenary of Dr. Aldert Smedes 283 

The Asheville Guild 283 

Extract from Miss Clement's Will 283 

MissEleanor Clement 284 

Miss Czarnomska 286 

Minutes of the Founder's Day Meetings 290 

In Memoriam. Frances Johnston Parker 294 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. ■ ■ • • One Dollar. 

Single Copies, • ■ > > ■ Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. rai.kigh, n. c. 

ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ckuikshank .... Alumnse Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnse Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

IMrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 
Mrs. F. P. Tucker. Raleigh. 
Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer, • Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



Miss McVea to the Alumnae. 



The relations of alumnse to their alma mater and their power in stim- 
ulating the progress and in fostering the educational interests of an in- 
stitution have never been as emphasized as to-day. Colleges are press- 
ing the formation not only of General Alumni organizations but also 
of smaller bodies which may form strong nuclei in different parts of 
the country. Harvard, for example, has recently enthusiastically cele- 
brated a large convention of delegates in the middle West. So impor- 
tant was this meeting considered that it commanded the presence both 
of Mr. Eliot and of the recently elected president, Mr. Lowell. The 
influence of the alumni and their right to a voice in shaping the policy 
of the institution were frankly and gladly recognized and together the 
president of Harvard and the alumni discussed such vital questions as 
the rejection or retention of present entrance requirements, the province 
of athletics, and the elective system. The Harvard meeting is a single 
instance of the spirit that is animating schools and colleges all over the 



The St. Mary s Muse. 279 



country. Even the public schools which are independent of endow- 
ments and private gifts are keenly alive to the power of an organized 
alumni in arousing the sentiment of the community in favor of a liberal 
tax for better car lines, improved buildings and modern equipment. 
Thus High School alumni associations are becoming increasingly im- 
portant factors in public school life. 

The governing body of St. Mary's Alumnae, an association which con- 
sists of all former pupils of the school, feels that the spirit of the times 
should strengthen the association and inspire it to increasing influence 
and usefulness. St. Mary's has ever had its face set toward the fu- 
ture, its standards have always been high, its work for education and 
for the church has been inestimable. But we are confident that the 
future holds in store greater things for this school of our affections. 
Already there are new buildings in process of construction which will 
greatly enlarge the capacity and the efficiency of the institution. More 
complete equipment, more scholarships, further endowment are a neces- 
sity for increasing usefulness. The former pupils who have shared in 
the advantages, loved the traditions and aided in the upbuilding of the 
past must have part in the large work of the future. We believe that 
the daughters of St. Mary's will not fail to rise to the high opportunity 
for service to St. Mary's, to education and to the church, which the pres- 
ent movement offers. 

Two years ago at the annual meeting the association determined to 
found two scholarships in honor of two of St. Mary's daughters who 
have devoted their lives to the service of the school, Mrs. Mary Iredell 
and Miss Kate McKimmon, the interest of the funds to be used per- 
sonally by the recipients during their lifetime, the principal to go 
eventually toward an endowment fund. A considerable portion of that 
money has been raised and the committee is encouraged to believe that 
the work for the scholarships can be completed by the first of April, 
1910. The 20th of April is the one hundredth anniversary of the birth 
of the founder of St. Mary's, the Rev. Aldert Smedes, and nothing could 
be more fitting than to do honor at the same time to the two women who 
were so closely associated with him in his life-work. We ask the hearty 
cooperation of every former student to enable us to accomplish our pur- 
pose. On the completion of the scholarship funds the Alumnae purpose 



280 The St. Maby's Muse. 



to aid in the securing of a much needed endowment. To-day no school 
can do its best work without either State aid or private endowment; 
from the nature of the case we can never have State aid, therefore we 
who love St. Mary's and who believe in her work, must see to it that we 
have an adequate endowment. 

In order to make the present alumna? organization compact and effect- 
ive the present committees were appointed at a meeting held June 2 2d, 
1909, to carry out the necessary details of the work. 

Raleigh, June 25, 1909. Emilie W. McVea. 



The Alumnae Committees, 1909. 



An Executive Committee elected by ballot of all the members of the 
Association at the Annual Meeting is to be added to the present govern- 
ing body. Until the Annual Meeting of 1910, the present Raleigh 
Scholarship Committee is to act as an Executive Committee pro tern : 

Executive Committee pro tern. — The Officers of the Association, ex officio; Mrs. 
Herbert Jackson, Chairman; Mrs. A. W. Knox, Mrs. Ashby Baker, Mrs. I. McK. 
Pittenger, Mrs. Charles Root, Mrs. William Shipp, Mrs. Robert Strong, Mrs. Kemp 
Battle, Mrs. M. T. Leake, Miss Kate Cheshire. 

Committee on Alumnce Roll. — Mrs. Charles Root, Chairman; Miss Kate McKim- 
mon, Mrs. Walter Montgomery. 

Committee on Alumnw Muse. — Mrs. William E. Shipp, Chairman; Mrs. Herbert 
Jackson, Miss Eliza Pool, Miss Margaret Stedman, Mrs. Wilton Lindsay. 

Committee on Arrangements for the Annual Meeting. — Mrs. Carl Woodruff, Chair- 
man; Mrs. Thomas Kenan, Mrs. Ashby Baker, Mrs. Frank Ward, Mrs. W. C. 
Whitfield. 

Nominating Committee. — Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Chairman; Mrs. A. W. Knox, 
Mrs. Robert Strong, Miss Susan Marshall. 



The Rector to the Alumnae. 



I have been asked to write a letter to the Alumnae to appear in the 
special Alumnse number of The Muse. 

Among the many pleasant experiences in my life at St. Mary's has 
been the privilege of meeting wherever I go a large number of the 
Alumnae of all ages, and I have been much gratified at the very cordial 






The St. Mary's Muse. 281 

way in which, my official position as Hector has brought me the oppor- 
tunities of making their acquaintance. I hope that as time goes on 
this pleasant relation between the Rector and the Alumnae will have 
added to it an additional pleasure in the personal regard that we will 
feel to each other, and I can truly say for myself that I have already 
formed a genuine personal regard for many of the Alumnse which I 
trust in all humility may in some cases at least be reciprocated. 

For after all, in addition to the official position and work of the Rec- 
tor, he is human, has very intimate personal relations with a large num- 
ber of people, and to accomplish his work in the best way must have in 
some degree at least the personal support of those who are already 
friends of the school. 

This is one of many reasons why I have been particularly glad to 
have the Alumnse visit the school and see for themselves what is being 
done and come into personal touch with all who are engaged in the work. 

I believe that all the Alumnse are sincerely solicitous for the welfare 
of the school, and yet I fear there is a large number who from inad- 
vertence or neglect of making use of opportunity do not exercise the 
influence which is possible. 

It is not necessary for me to enlarge here on the material needs of 
the school which are immediate and pressing. For the purpose of this 
letter I shall only emphasize the importance of having all the Alumnse 
correctly informed about the school and of their taking the trouble to 
see that this correct information is given to others. 

Before coming to St. Mary's, I knew in several ways a great many 
things about the school. Since coming here I have learned a great 
many other things. In so doing I have been obliged in many cases to 
compare accounts of the school that from time to time came to me 
directly and indirectly with the actual conditions as I find them here at 
the school. Some things that are said persistently about the school in 
various sections I can not find justified by the facts revealed to me here 
on the spot. I shall mention two. 

One is that the life here is extravagant. I am unable to see any 
ground for this position. In any school of this class there will be some 
difference in dress, and to me it would seem foolish for those who must 
always dress plainly to demand that others should dress in just the same 



282 The St. Maky's Muse. 

way. A uniform for the school has been proposed, but it seems to me 
that this would destroy the opportunity for individual taste, which is an 
important part of education at the period when girls are here, while it 
would also prevent the necessary discipline of life, which is to me an 
important part of education, that one should learn cheerfully and with 
perfect self-respect to do without some of the things that others can 
have who are better off. I believe that all at St. Mary's should dress 
simply and that unnecessary expenditure should be kept down, and this 
end seems to me, on the whole, to be attained. The few cases of ex- 
travagance which I have noticed have been owing to the indulgence of 
the parent, over which the school can exercise no control. I think I 
can say with perfect truth that any girl of the most modest means can 
go through St. Mary's with perfect self-respect and happiness and with- 
out incurring any unnecessary expense. 

The other criticism is that the girls do not work. I will admit that 
the scholarship of the pupils is not what it should be and that I expect 
to see it raised. This is owing largely to poor preparation before the 
pupils come here and to a lack of correct educational ideas on the part 
of those who have had control of them before they came here. While 
we receive some new pupils very well prepared from some institutions, 
it is a fact that of the girls in a given class those who have just come 
into it from other schools are found to be inferior on the average to 
those who have spent the previous year in the lower class here. Taking 
the school as a whole, I find that the girls are faithful, and industrious, 
and work hard and long. The results would be better with different 
previous preparation. I think I ought to add that the basis of my 
opinion with regard to work and scholarship is the testimony of other 
teachers here and my own experience in twelve recitations each week, 
which I have undertaken largely in order that I may have my informa- 
tion at first hand. I have taught personally nearly one hundred mem- 
bers of the school this year. 

It very often happens that people judge an individual or an institu- 
tion by one single point on which they may or may not be correctly 
informed. The Alumnae can help the school by getting correct and first- 
hand information on individual points and by informing themselves cor- 
rectly about the work of the school as a whole. The Bulletins will be 



The St. Mary's Muse. 283 

gladly sent to any who apply for them. The last issue has an article 
on the educational position of St. Mary's which may possibly be of 
interest. 

Assuring you of the high value which I attach to the work that the 
Alumnae have already done, and with cordial hopes and good wishes for 
your work in the future, I remain always, 

Yours very faithfully, George W. Lay, 

May 12, 1909. Rector. 



The Centenary of Dr. Aldert Smedes. 



Members of the Alumnse will note with interest the approach of the 
centennial of Dr. Aldert Smedes's birth. He was born in New York 
City, April 20, 1810, and died at St. Mary's, April 25, 1877. 

His birthday next year will be observed with fitting ceremony at the 
School and the Alumnse hope to mark it by the completion of the Schol- 
arship Funds. 



The Asheville Guild. 



Although I am not a member of the St. Mary's Guild of Asheville, 
N. C, as looker-on I have watched with interest the large amount of 
work done by this society, which is all the more praiseworthy on account 
of its being composed of very few active members. The guild has just 
sent to St. Mary's $50.00 towards the completion of the McKimmon- 
Iredell Scholarship Fund. A few years ago it contributed a thousand 
dollars to the chancel of the chapel, when it was enlarged, and for two 
years a young woman from this diocese was kept at school there through 
the fine efforts of the ladies of the guild. This may be of interest only 
to a limited few, but I really feel that such efforts as these are indeed 
worthy of publication. L. J. R. 



Extract from the Will of Miss Eleanor Clement. 



I, Eleanor Clement, of Germantown, in the City of Philadelphia, 
and State of Pennsylvania, do make this my last will and testament, 
hereby revoking all other wills by me previously made. * * * 



284 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Seventh. To Miss Frances O'Connor, should she survive me, I give 
and bequeath the sum of five hundred dollars, to be paid as soon as pos- 
sible after my decease. * * * I also request that she may be buried in 
my lot at Laurel Hill cemetery, unless she make another and different 
request. 

Eighth. I give and bequeath to the trustees of St. Mary's School at 
Raleigh, X. C, for the education of girls, five thousand dollars, to be 
used by the trustees of said corporation for said free scholarship, daugh- 
ters of clergymen to have the preference. The recipient to be chosen by 
the Trustees of the School. 

Seventeenth. All the rest of my estate, I give and bequeath to my 
executors hereinafter named in trust to invest the same and keep in- 
vested, and out of the income thereof to pay to my friend, Miss Frances 
O'Connor annuity of one thousand dollars as long as she may survive 
me. * * * After the death of Miss O'Connor, I direct my estate shall 
be settled as soon as possible, and the balance thereof paid to the Trus- 
tees of St. Mary's School, Raleigh, ST. C, to be held in trust by them 
for the benefit of said school. 

Lastly, I nominate and appoint The Pennsylvania Company for In- 
surances on Lives and Granting Annuities, the executor and trustee of 
this, my last will and testament. 

Witness my hand and seal this eleventh day of June, A. D., 1900. 

[Under these clauses of this will the Trustees of St. Mary's have come into pos- 
session of the $5,000 scholarship endowment, and about $30,000, proceeds of the 
residuary estate. Miss O'Connor, friend of Miss Clement, and former teacher at 
St. Mary's, died August 4, 1908.] 



Miss Eleanor Clement. 



[Reprint from the January, 1904, Muse.) 

The scholarship legacy of five thousand dollars, by bequest from 
Miss Eleanor Clement of Germantown, Pa., of which the Board of 
Trustees of St. Mary's School has had recent notification, will no doubt 
give rise to inquiries from many who are interested. 

Those who knew St. Mary's "in the forties" will not need any 
reminder of Madame Clement, who came with Dr. Aldert Smedes to 






The St. Mary's Muse. 285 

Raleigh in 1842 to take charge of the French department, and who 
proved a most capable and valuable assistant in his work of building up 
St. Mary's. 

When Madame Clement came to America she left her only child, 
Eleanor, then very young, with two aunts living in Paris, and the little 
girl remained with them until she was twelve or thirteen years old when 
she joined her mother at St. Mary's to receive there her English educa- 
tion. Then she spent a few years again in Paris to fit her for the position 
of teacher of French at St. Mary's. This place she filled for some time, 
making many friends as she had done previously while a pupil. Dur- 
ing these years of her life at St. Mary's, Miss Clement was the recipient 
of many kindnesses in the homes of her school friends, and these at- 
tentions made a lasting impression upon what seems to have been a 
deeply grateful nature. Many instances might be given of benefac- 
tions extended by her in later life to the children of her early friends, 
and her interest in St. Mary's was marked throughout her life. 

It was not until 1867 or '68, many years after Madame Clement had 
left St. Mary's, that she and her daughter founded a school in German- 
town, Pa., under church auspices. There they gathered around them 
most efficient teachers, and the school had the benefit of some of the best 
lecturers in the country. For more than twenty-five years it was con- 
tinued with great success. 

Several years after the founding of this school, Miss Clement came 
with Miss O'Connor to make a visit at St. Mary's. And about five 
years ago she was again in Raleigh visiting Miss Bailey, a former pupil 
of the Germantown School. 

Madame Clement died in 1878, and Miss Clement, after six or eight 
years gave up her school and sold the property, but continued to live 
in Germantown, having her friend Miss O'Connor with her, from that 
time until Miss Clement's death which occurred on October 1, 1904. 
She was a woman of wide culture and high aims, and she led a useful 
life full of good works, spending the means with which God had blessed 
her own and her mother's efforts in charitable and church work. Sev- 
eral times she went abroad, for she had cousins in Europe. She was in 
London with her friend Miss O'Connor when she heard that St. Mary's 
had become a diocesan institution. In a letter written upon the re- 



286 The St. Mary's Muse. 

ceipt of this intelligence, she says, "You will know how glad I am 
when I tell you that it has long been my wish to make some provision 
for St. Mary's in my will, and I could not do this while it was a private 
school. Now I can carry out my intention." This she did, and most 
nobly, as the sequel has proved. In her will, she remembered the 
church she loved and every branch of its mission work — charities in 
which she had always shown a living interest, — the poor of her parish, 
faithful servants of her own and of her mother, her relatives and sev- 
eral friends, — foremost among them Miss O'Connor. This friend who 
was her teacher when she first came as a little girl to St. Mary's, taught 
afterwards at "Madame Clement's School," and for ten years lived in 
Miss Clement's home as a sister. 

When the ample provision made for her shall be no longer needed, 
the body of Miss Clement's estate is left to St. Mary's. The manner of 
the bequest is as beautiful as the gift is noble, and the whole is worthy 
of the woman who while she lived gave gladly and freely and led others 
to do the same. 

In a letter recently received from one of Miss Clement's friends we 
find this tribute to her character: 

"She was a godly woman full of grace and true charity, and a most 
loyal, faithful friend. I am glad to have counted myself as one of 
those who dearly loved and valued her, and who enjoyed her affection 
and friendship to the end of her life." 

Miss Clement had made her plans to go with two of her former pupils 
to Boston for the meeting of the Triennial Convention, but violent ill- 
ness prevented, and on the first day of October, she entered into rest. 

"He that hath my commandments and keepeth them, he it is that 
loveth Me." M. I. 



Miss CzarnomsKa. 



To some is given the power to acquire rich stores of knowledge; to 
some, the power to draw out and direct the talents of others ; to some 
few, the power to perceive truth and beauty and pass them on to other 
souls. The combination of these — the power to learn, to teach, to in- 
spire — is rare indeed, and it is this which is so pre-eminently the gift 
and strength of our former Lady Principal — Miss Czarnomska. 



The St. Mary's Mtjse. 287 

Dear me, what memories surge with the name ! A slender figure in 
a gown of light blue, of some soft material with a touch of white at the 
throat and sweeping down the front, a pale face with fine mobile fea- 
tures, the broad, white brow with its crown of glorious black hair 
growing in a little peak in front, the straight eyebrows, and the eyes — 
gray, or violet, or black, as humor, tenderness, or indignation ruled the 
spirit — and I can not fail to add, the white hand with its ring of topaz. 

A vision most welcome if one's composition had been written and 
handed in, one's algebra and trigonometry learned and inwardly di- 
gested, one's "piece" thoroughly prepared for the Saturday evening re- 
cital, one's "part" ready for the rehearsal of "Taming of the Shrew," 
or "Midsummer Night's Dream," or "The Princess," or "King Rene's 
Daughter," and last but not least, if one's work for The Muse had been 
pronounced finished and ready for the printer. 

A vision to be most diligently (but usually unsuccessfully — avoided) 
if one happened to be in arrears with these varied duties — for that 
meant a lecture on responsiblity and the utter weakness and foolishness 
of extreme youth (the senior class) which failed to recognize opportuni- 
ties and use them for the good of the school, for the welfare of fellow 
students and for their own future success in life. Then the class said 
"good night," and went out looking meek, but feeling strong to bear all 
burdens and accomplish all tasks. Margie Busbee (Shipp) tells a story 
of these bygone days. She says that if, in the summer vacation, a 
young man led a young girl from the ballroom to a rustic seat upon the 
lawn, in the moonlight, to rest between dances — if the girl were from 
St. Mary's, and the man a young man of tact, who wished to ingratiate 
himself into favor, he leaned forward with an air of chivalrous atten- 
tion and said, in a pleading deep-toned voice of interest, "Now, tell me 
about Miss Czarnomska!" 

Miss Czarnomska was versatile and thorough — oh, yes! she ivas 
thorough! Wallenstein (Mittie Dowd) drew his sword and said "schei- 
det," while Max Picolomini (Alice Hagood) strode angrily to one side 
(oh, so beautifully like a real actor) and Tekla (Annie Philips) 
fainted in the corner, over and over and over again, until there was very 
little acting in either the anger or the faint. 

The play was "good" at Commencement, "they said," and that re- 



288 The St. Mary's Muse. 

minds me, there must have been something very wonderful about Miss 
Czarnomska. When the curtain was going up, those players, with ice 
cold hearts and hands and feet, found upon hasty inquiry, that there 
was not one German word in their combined vocabulary, and yet when 
the curtain was up and they looked straight into Miss Czarnomska's in- 
tent eyes, they remembered all they had ever learned. 

We worked hard but we have many happy memories. The delight- 
ful evenings in Miss Czarnomska's room, when we read Prescott's His- 
tory of Mexico and some very learned thing about the Jews and the lost 
tribes — I don't remember it (but I don't have to, Belle Graves knows, 
and can answer any question — was she not valedictorian?) but I do re- 
remember "Abt Vogler" and "Saul," "Rabbi Ben Ezra" and "Fra 
Lippo Lippi," almost every word and the tones of Miss Czarnomska's 
voice as she read, and "Mill on the Floss," when Maggie and Tom were 
drowned, silence reigned and the seniors wept, except Emmie Smedes, 
who wouldn't but rolled lamp lighters hard and choked instead. And 
then the Xmas holidays with "Happy Thoughts" to last us a lifetime, 
and the delicious lunches in her room with an occasional "boy from 
Chapel Hill" for a guest ; and the evenings in the parlor with the logs 
burning in the big fireplace, the old sofas drawn up to make cozy and 
comfortable and the merry games, "drop the handkerchief," "Jacob and 
Rachel," etc., and Miss Czarnomska herself the life of it all. Well it 
was a happy time, and if we didn't know then, we do know now, how 
much of herself and of her time she was giving for our pleasure, and we 
are grateful in its best sense — we are willing to do likewise. 

It comes to me more and more, that our class, especially, has much 
to thank her for — for the hard work, and the discipline (and there was 
plenty of it), for much of the pleasure of our school days at St. Mary's, 
and for the privilege of her companionship. Personally, I owe one of 
the happiest hours of my life to Miss Czarnomska and after all these 
years, I am glad of the opportunity to acknowledge my indebtedness. 
It is too long a story to tell — enough to say it began with tragedy (it 
had to do with a graduating essay) and ended with joy — and my mind 
received a stimulus which took it a long way in its intellectual life. 

I have it on no less an authority than Mr. Edward Howard Griggs, 
that "limitation implies strength — it is where strength leaves off," 



The St. Mary's Muse. 289 

so I may be forgiven if I mention Miss Czarnomska's "limitation." — 
She could not teach me "spherical trigonometry," not even with an open 
umbrella to represent the earth and herself the moon moving around it. 

The sines and cosines of those mysterious spherical angles will always 
be for me a part of the unknown 

Miss Czarnoniska came to St. Mary's in the fall of 1877, the year in 
which Dr. Aldert Smedes died, and Dr. Bennett Smedes took up his 
father's work, with Mrs. Meares as Lady Principal. Miss Czarnomska 
had taught the three years previous in the Preparatory School for 
Union College, Schenectady, 1ST. Y. The climate of Schenectady proved 
too severe and through Miss Young (now Mrs. Young-Fulton) Miss 
Czarnomska found a Southern home at St. Mary's. She remained three 
years, returning to Brooklyn, her home, on account of her aunt's health. 
This aunt, "Sister Eliza," (Miss Coakley) was a deaconess in the Sis- 
terhood of Long Island, Bishop Littlejohn's diocese, and had been as a 
mother to Miss Czarnomska from infancy. 

Dr. Crittenden, President of Packer Institute in Brooklyn, under 
whom Miss Czarnomska had graduated before she was seventeen, had 
offered her a position several times while she was at St. Mary's, but 
not until the failure of Sister Eliza's health did she decide to go. 

Miss Czarnomska remained at Packer until, on Mrs. Meares's resigna- 
tion in 1881, Dr. Bennett Smedes wrote to ask her to return to St. 
Mary's as Lady Principal. Learning that she would not leave her aunt, 
he asked her to bring Sister Eliza with her, and she did so. 

The years of Miss Czarnomska at St. Mary's were from Sept. '77 to 
June, '88 (omitting the year Sept., '80 to June, '81) making in all ten 
years, three for the first stay and seven after her return as Lady Prin- 
cipal. Her linguistic gifts, her music, her broad reading, her passion 
for study, her powers as a disciplinarian and her strong magnetic per- 
sonality made her most valuable as a teacher, and in her position as 
Lady Principal. 

From St. Mary's she went to Smith College, Northampton, and was 
there with Dr. Seelye for sixteen years. 

Five years ago, in 1904, she went from Smith, at the request of Dr. 
Dabney, to take the position of "Dean of Women" and "Lecturer on 
English Literature" at the University of Cincinnati. This position she 



290 The St. Maky's Muse. 

has now resigned on account of her health, which demands a rest from 
the active routine of college work; and her mantle of honor has fallen 
upon our own "Emmie Mac," (one of "Miss Czarnomska's girls," of the 
class of '84) and are we not proud of her and did we not show it in the 
last Muse? 

All who know Miss Czarnomska well will realize that with her "rest" 
is not idleness, but a time to regain strength for more work, and they 
will not be surprised to know that she already has a definite plan. Two 
years ago she was elected a member of the "National Association for 
Biblical Research" and perhaps this may be somewhat responsible for 
the itinerary of her year of "rest" ( ?) which is as follows: After a 
summer in Ireland and England she will be in France and Italy, until 
November, when she proposes to spend three months in Egypt, and then 
is looking forward to carrying out a long cherished desire and passing 
the spring in the Holy Land. Miss Czarnomska is emphatically the 
student, and the opportunity she now is to have for prosecuting her 
study along the line she has long preferred, added to freedom from re- 
sponsibility, may be all she needs for recovery. She will have as a sum- 
mer companion her cousin, Isabel Coakley, (formerly a pupil at St. 
Mary's) and a favorite pupil while at Smith will be with her in Egypt 
and the Holy Land. The Muse feels great interest in the journey and 
sends love and best wishes always. M. 



Minutes of Founder's Day Meetings, November I, 1908. 



Asheville Chapter. 

On Monday, November 2d, the alunmse of Asheville met with Mrs. 
Carrie Carr Mitchell on Church street, at 4 o'clock. 

Mrs. Theordore F. Davidson opened the meeting with the school 
prayer and the Lord's prayer, in which all those present heartily joined. 

Miss Laura Carter then read a little extract from one of the Muses, 
A tribute to "Miss Katie," written by Miss McVea. This was fol- 
lowed by an article from Miss Martin, telling of Founder's Day, its 



The St. Mart's Muse. 291 

relation and importance to the School, and how it served to bind into 

closer union everywhere the St. Mary's daughters. Mrs. Mitchell was 

then asked to give a sketch of the work done by St. Mary's guild, and 

her report was so pleasing and gratifying to all present that thereupon 

Miss Laura Carter proposed that Mrs. Mitchell be given a vote of 

thanks, as she was literally the backbone of the guild, and this was 

unanimously done. After this the business of the meeting being over, 

the time was spent in discussing St. Mary's to our heart's content. Mrs. 

Mitchell had numerous photographs of the chapel in its different stages, 

and the other buildings present, and they were eagerly looked at by the 

different ones. After delicious refreshments, the meeting adjourned. 

Those present were : 

Mrs. Thomas Settle, Mrs. Theodore F. Davidson, Mrs. Carrie Carr Mitchell, Miss 
Annie H. Martin, Miss Maria Brown, Miss Grace McHardy Jones, Miss Lottie 
Sherrill, Miss Alice Gray Devenish, Miss Laura Carter, Miss Lucy Taylor Redwood. 

Alumnae of Asheville, N. C. 
Maria Brown, Agnes Carter, Susie Carter, Laura Carter, Rebecca Cushman, Mrs. 
Tench Cox (Sally Potter), Mrs. T. F. Davidson (Sally Carter), Alice Devenish, 
Elsie Gudger, Sarah Jones, Grace McHardy Jones, Mrs. W. M. Jones (Lily Haugh- 
ton), Mrs. Lily Jones (Lily Woodfin), Cammie Jones, Mrs. Thomas A. Jones (Josie 
Myers), Annie H. Martin, Anne Martin, Mrs. A. D. Martin (Annie Davis), Virginia 
Griffith Miller, Mrs. Carrie Carr Mitchell (Carrie Carr), Mrs. T. W. Patton (Martha 
Turner), Fanny L. Patton, Lucy Taylor Redwood, Mrs. Thomas Settle (Eliza Pot- 
ter), Lottie Sherrill. 

Durham Chapter. 
Minutes of pounder's Day Meeting in Durham on November 1. All Saints Day. 

The home of Judge and Mrs. Robert W. Winston was the scene of a 
most pleasant gathering of St. Mary's Alumnse. The meeting was 
for the observance of Founder's Day, of that dear old Alma Mater. 
Mrs. Winston received the guests most pleasantly, and after prayers, in- 
cluding the special prayer for St. Mary's, the meeting opened. 

There were ten present and they much enjoyed the suggested program 
for Founder's Day, which Mrs. Winston, the President used. It was 
decided that the Chapter should work for the scholarships and assess 
themselves $1.00 per year for the support of same. Mrs. W. A. Erwin 
was elected Secretary, and it was suggested she write the Treasurer at 
St. Mary's for blanks, which she will send to all the Alumna? here, as 
many were prevented from attending the meeting. At the conclusion of 
the business part of the program, a granddaughter of St. Mary's, Miss 



292 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Winston, served delightful refreshments, and while enjoying them, 
many pleasant incidents of old school days were recalled, and a most 
touching and beautiful tribute was paid the name of Dr. Aldert Smedes, 
by our President. We hope to secure more subscriptions when the 
blanks are received, and we left feeling that the meeting had been a great 
success, and full of encouragement for the future. 

With very best wishes, Sadie Smedes Erwtn, 

Secretary, 
r^ock. Hi" Chapter. 

The minutes of last year's Chapter meetings on All Saints Day were 
most enjoyable, and I do hope that many more Chapters will write to 
you this year. 

We met this year in the dear little church here, and asked our minis- 
ter in charge, Rev. R. M. Marshall, to conduct the meeting. No business 
was discussed and Miss McVea's letter was not read, because of lack of 
time. Mr. Marshall read the prayers, and we were glad to add two new 
names to our roll — Miss Hattie Rawlinson, of Rock Hill, and Miss Bes- 
sie W T hittaker, who is teaching English here. Miss Schutt was unable 
to attend the meeting, also Margaret Wilson, who is at home this year. 
I, too, was away, in the mountains with my mother, who was sick. 

I wonder if you have Miss Hattie Howe's name on the list of Alum- 
nae. She is Bishop Howe's daughter, and she and my mother (nee Sa- 
die Cornish) were the only South Carolina girls at St. Mary's for one 
or two years of their time there. Miss Howe's address is 91 Broad St., 
Charleston, and my mother's is Peace Hill Plantation, Edisto Island, 
S. C. 

With all best wishes for The Muse and especially for the Alumnae 
number, I remain, 

Very sincerely, Sadie M. Jenkins. 

Our Roll. 

Miss G. C. Schutt, Miss Hattie Rawlinson, Miss Bessie Lewis Whittaker, Miss 
Alice Edwards Jones, Miss Margaret Wilson, Miss Susie Battle, Miss Sadie Jenkins. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 293 

Wilmington Chapter. 

The Alumnae of Wilmington met in St. James' Parish House, Oct. 
31st, 1908. The meeting was called to order by the President, Mrs. A. 
M. Waddell, and opened by a short prayer and collect. The Secretary, 
Miss Jane Iredell Green called the roll and read the minutes of the 
last meeting. We then discussed the business before the meeting. Mrs. 
Waddell read Miss Mc Yea's letter in regard to the Iredell-McKimmon 
scholarships. It was decided to assess every member of the Wilmington 
Alumnae — in that way making up a sum which shall be contributed to 
the scholarships. A committee was then appointed for the purpose of 
collecting this money. 

The meeting was adjourned. 

Miss Louise Bunting,, Chairman. 

Those present at the meeting were as follows: 

Mrs. Kate Meares, Mrs. A. M. Waddell, Miss Jennie Murchison, Miss Elsie Emer- 
son, Miss Julia Parsley, Miss Mamie Clark, Miss Mary Payne, Miss Sue Prince, 
Miss Louise Bunting. 



294 The St. Maey's Muse. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



FRANCES JOHNSTON PARKER. 
From the Monroe Journal. 

The poet has said : "We live in deeds, not years ; in thoughts, not in 
figures on a dial. We should count time by heart throbs. He most lives 
who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best." If this be true, and 
we believe it is, then Frances Johnston Parker, though scarcely past 
the prime of life, had reached a grand old age. 

She was born in Edenton, ~$. C, on March 31, 1854. She was a de- 
scendent of Gabriel Johnston, one of our colonial Governors, and her 
ancestors for generations had been people of wealth, social position and 
culture. Born and reared in an atmosphere of refinement, she never 
lowered her standard, but to the end was the same cultured, refined, tact- 
ful woman. At the age of twelve she entered St. Mary's College, Ra- 
leigh, and graduated with honor at that institution. After her graduation 
there she prosecuted her studies in Baltimore. In 1882 she married Mr. 
J. D. Parker of Monroe, who with four children, two sons and two 
daughters, survive her. These are the bare facts of her life, but they 
give a very imperfect idea of her brilliant mind and sterling qualities of 
character. She was a woman of very superior intellect and great per- 
sonal magnetism, and exerted a wonderful influence over those with 
whom she came in contact. But her brilliant intellect was not her 
most valuable asset. She possessed the armament of a meek and quiet 
spirit, and her gentle courtesy and unfailing helpfulness will be sorely 
missed by those with whom she was associated. She was an ideal wife 
and mother, and taught her children by precept and example the value 
of right living. She was a member of the Episcopal church, a devout 
Christian, and possessed in a large degree the charity that thinketh no 
evil. One who had known her well for thirty years said, "I never 
heard her speak evil of any human being." Verily, her children shall 
rise up and call her blessed, for she has left them a rich legacy in her 
beautiful life. 

" Death should come 
Gently to one of gentle mould like thee 
As light winds, wandering through groves of bloom 
Detach the delicate blossoms from the tree. 
Close thy sweet eyes calmly and without pain, 
And we will trust in God to see thee once again." 



REfJD !— M0RK !-0CT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. L,et the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



1 It's worth the difference ' 



WHARTON & TYREE 

" Workers in Artistic Photography ' 



The Annual Muse for 1909. 

The St. Mary's Year Book, 

ready May 25th. 

A few copies yet to be had at $2.50. 
Address : St. Mary's Muse, 

Raleigh, N. C. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FIM SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders rilled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVII/LE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



Smith * Tomst Co. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILIE STREET 



Society Monogram Papers, Visiting Cards and Stationery 

OF THE NICEST QUALITY AND LATEST STYLES AT 

ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO'S BOOKSTORE 

A Good Grade Fountain Pen at $1.00 



Raleigh and Southport Railway 

Short line between Raleigh and Fayetteville 
Wilmington, Maxton, Red Springs, Bennettsville, 
Florence, Charleston, and all Atlantic Coast Line 
points. For information as to schedule and rates 
call on local agent, or write 

F. T. RICKS, 
Asst. General Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, H. W. JACKSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, Secretary. 



The Boss has gone to the Pacific 
To take a jaunt quite beatific, 
And left poor me to print the Muse, 
With verse select, besides the news. 
He left poor me, but no advisements 
How I should pad the advertisements. 



H. ROSENTHAL 
J GO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS BEADY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 






Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 

BANKING. 
All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 

Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



3 he (Citizens •^ta.tiona.l */janU 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, - - $ 100,000.00 
Surplus, - - lOO.OOO.OO 

Deposits, - 1,175,000.00 

Assets, - 1.500,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchfoed, Cashier 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO. 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N C. 



I know not well the place he went to, — 

Seattle, Denver, Sacramento, — 

But well I know that here I be, 

Though much preferring I were he. 

(The grammar's queer; but what's expected, 

When work's thrust on one, not elected.) 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


KING-CROWELX'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 


WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURA.NCE.' 


ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 


Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 


MISSKS REESE & COMPANY 
Millinery. 


GRIMES & VASS, Raleigh, N. C 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing: Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 



INSURE IN THE 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

EALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY. 

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW 

Ladies' Furnishings and Novelties. 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry aud Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 
COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy — China. 

Pictures. Stationery. Toys. 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



I read the proof, corrected spelling, 

Made good some points he'd spoiled in telling, 

And, when I thought my work all done, 

I reached these ads. — that spoiled my fun. 

For here were spaces four, still vacant. 

"Choose copy," say the printers. They can't. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


BOBBINS' LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

'PHONE 81. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 


J. SCHWARTZ, 
RICHMOND MARKET. 


H. STEINM ETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds. 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 


Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


DflDT QIMDQHM Drugs and Perfumes, 
KUIjI olIVlruUIN, Toilet Articles, etc. 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 


H. T. HICKS CO. 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



Advertisements. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 
Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 
Fkancis P.Venablb, Pres., Chapel Hill, N. C 



So here I roast 'mid heat of summer, 
And envy much that happy bummer, 
While writing out this silly stuff. 
But see! I have almost enough! 
In fact, without much botheration, 
I think I've saved the situation! 



The Office Bot. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 


\gj0r 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited. 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 
Fayetteville Street. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. Pullen. 

Pres., Chas. Root, Cash'r. Capital and Surplus 
875,000. Fourpercent interest paid on deposits 



Location Central for the Carolina*. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C 

{for girls and young women). 



68ih ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 16, 1909. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 20, 1910. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC 8CH00L. 

3. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: f ^ THE ART SCHOOL 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



200 students from 13 States and Central America. 

Twenty-five Members of the Faculty. 

Two new dormitories and a large new building containing dining 
room and gymnasium ready in September, 1909. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Stein way Grand Pianos. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training. 



For Catalogue and other information address 



Rev. George W. Lay, 

RECTOR. 



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